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Full text of "The Connecticut magazine"

ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01738 9575 



GENEALOGY 
974.6 
C7698A 
1899, 
JULY- DEC. 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/connecticutmagazv5p2hart 



Vol. V. 



July, 1899. 



No. 7. 



i_ 



CONNECTICUT 



vm* 




■:-■■ 



/ 



AN ILLVSTRATED 









IN THIS NUMBER. 

$£r* Z&** t^* 

Away from the Railroad in 
Connecticut. 

Middle Haddam. 

A Son of Connecticut* 

Prudence Crandall. 

Etc, Etc. 

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See Contents on First Page 







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JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. JOHN E. MORRIS, Secretary. 

S. C. DUNHAM, Vice-President. H. J. MESSENGER, Actuary. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



THE 

Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, 
Literature, Science, Art and Industries. 



JULY, 1899. 686545 



vol. v. CONTENTS. No. 7. 



Summer — An Old Mill. (Frontispiece.) 

Away From the Railroad in Connecticut. William White Leete, 351 

Illustrated by Photographs taken by the Author. 

The Parting. Poem. Charles G. Girelius, 361 

A Son of Connecticut. Illustrated. Marcus A. Casey, 362 

The Town of Chatham. Part II. Middle Haddam Society. Illustrated. 

Israel F. Lootnis, 370 

List of Burials, Center Church Burying Ground, Hartford. Annotated by Mary K. Talcott, 382 



Prudence Crandall. 


Note by the Editor, 


386 


To the Connecticut River. Poem. 


Arthur Fremont Rider, 


388 


Departments. — Genealogical Department. 




389 


From the Societies. 




392 


Editorial Notes. 




393 


Book Notes. 




394 


Publishers' Notes. 




397 


George C. At well, Editor. 


Edward B. Eaton, Business Manager 





All communications should be addressed to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, Conn. Remittances 
should be by check, express order, P. O. money order or registered letter. Money by mail at sender's risk. We 
promptly acknowledge by postal card all subscriptions received by mail. "When change of address is desired give 
both old and new address. Do not subscribe of a person unknown to you. Our authorized agents have full 
credentials. 



$J,00 a Year. THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. JO Cents a Copy. 

Published at 66 State St., Hartford, Conn, by The Connecticut Magazine Co. 



Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn, as mail matter of the second-class. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



The Connecticut Agricultural College* 

■" 111 fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, 
Where wealth accumulates, and men decay, 
r'rinces and lords may nourish or may fade, — 
A breath can make them, as a breath has made; 
But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, 
When once destroyed, can never be supplied." 

It has been truly said that "Education is a debt that the present owes to the future," 
but all are not agreed as to just how that debt shall be paid. Those, however, who have 
given the subject the most careful thought, and have studied intelligently the history of the 
past, concur in the opinion that the education to be projected into the future, the education 
that shall preserve and entail free institutions, should be directed by minds the best equipped 
in. mental and moral science, literature and art, mathematical knowledge and mechanical 
skill, and physical law in the realm of nature. In this the Federal Government takes the 
initiative, and asks the States to build and equip colleges which shall give to the " Industrial 
Classes" not only practical education but also the skill to use it, and with her request gives 
the State of Connecticut annually by the " Land Grant " act of '62, over $6,000, and by the 
Morrill act of '90, $25,000 after this year; but conditionally, each fund for specific uses and 
nothing else. 

The Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs, Connecticut, in the town of Mansfield, 
is the college established by the State to meet conditions, on which the Federal funds may 
be received and used. All students of the State over fifteen years of age of both sexes are 
entitled to the privileges of this college, so far as its equipment will meet the demands 
made upon it. 




Entrance examinations will be held on Friday, September 1, Selectmen's Room, City 
Hall, Danbury, Council Chamber, City Hall, Norwich, and at the State Experiment Station, 
New Haven. Saturday, September 2, Room 50, Capitol Building, Hartford, First District 
School Building, East Winsted, and at the College, Storrs. 

The examinations will begin at 9 o'clock a. m. 

The new catalogues are now ready for distribution, and all requests for information will be 
promptly attended to. Address all communications to G. W. Flint, President, Storrs, Conn. 

Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



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General education may be carried forward in classes of Free 
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Discipline kind, yet firm. Environment decidedly Christian, 
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Address THE COURANT. Hartford, Ct. 



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can be engaged for Concerts, Religious and Social 
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For terms, dates, etc., address William Richard Grif- 
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Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



\ Fine Resident REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS, Choice^ j*j> 

'< Property J> J> — Building Sites 

Read " Griffith's Samples" in the daily papers* 

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NO MOSQUITOES NO MALARIA. 




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25 



The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. V. 



July, 1899. 



No. 7 



AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IX CONNECTICUT. 



BY WILLIAM WHITE LEETE. 



Illustrated by photographs taken by the author. 



T 



HE records of Litchfield County, the lake which, named after the chief, is 
Connecticut, tell us that in 1755 now called Waramaug. 
there died an old Indian sachem by the During the last illness of this chief, so 




WARAMAUG. 



name of Raumaug. He ruled the Bantam the story goes. Dr. Daniel Boardman of 

Indians whose reservation was partly in New Milford came often to see him. 

the parish of New Preston bordering on The majority of the Indians, the chief's 

35i 



352 AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 



wife included, were bitterly opposed to 
Christianity. One day the sachem asked 
Dr. Boardman to pray with him. As soon 
as the reverend gentleman began, the 
medicine man of the tribe began also, and 
a powwow was set in operation at the 
door of the lodge. The louder Dr. Board- 
man prayed the louder waxed the powwow. 



himseif in the waters of the Housatonic. 
To the region of this lake, over whose 
pagan history very few care to ask a 
question, an increasing number of visitors 
come every year seeking rest and health ; 
nor in its natural charms and advantages 
are they ever disappointed. Even those 
whose days began beside the Connecticut 




THE MOUNTAIN SIDE. 



After the lapse of three hours, as it seemed 
to the minister who was determined not 
to be silenced by a blind worshipper of 
Satan, the exorcists were completely 
exhausted. With an unearthly yell the 
medicine man took to his heels, nor 
stopped till up to his neck, he was cooling 



river confess to a surprise that in the State 
which they supposed they knew are scenes 
so wildly picturesque and yet so close to 
those adorned by man. Under some 
shady tree, while brooks are gurgling by 
and insects humming their delight, our 
eyes take in the changing surface of the 



AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 353 



lake, while breezes sweep across it, or 
follow with wonder the path of shadows 
cast by clouds that chase each other o'er 
the hills. Yonder are the herds of sheep 
or cattle feeding on the stony pasture, 
the rambling walls, the pines that loom up 
mid the beech and oak and maple of the 
forest, the bushy chestnut standing out 
alone upon some knoll — the bow of 
promise to some lad who has trudged by 
it on his way to school. 

But this rural life becomes to some an 
interesting place for other reasons. The 



railroad." This was interesting. Four- 
teen miles a day each way for Uncle Sam, 
at seventy-five dollars a year ! What could 
Warren be ! I determined to find out 
and walked seven miles to see. I read 
the records. Many a city could be proud 
to have its name and history. Set apart 
in 1786, though earlier settled, it took its 
name from the physician-hero of Bunker 
Hill. It was a Warren man, Major 
Eleazer Curtis, into whose arms fell Gen. 
Wooster at the battle of Ridgefield in 
1777, while harassing the red-coats on 




warren. 



" study of mankind is man." These hills 
have sent out to the world of strife some 
of the clearest minds and warmest hearts. 
Is it not worth our while to think about 
them, while we tarry in the places of 
their birth? 

Along the eastern edge of Waramaug 
a woman driving an open buckboard 
passed to and fro each day and I enquired 
her errand. "She carries the mail," they 
said, " between the villages from Warren 
to New Milford where it reaches the 



their retreat from Danbury. It was the 
home of Charles G. Finney, the renowned 
evangelist, born 1792, and President of 
Oberlin in 1852. Here Julian M. Sturte- 
vant passed his first ten years 1 805-1 81 5, 
and, moving on in that long procession 
which has gone out from Old New 
England farms, became the President of 
Illinois' first college in 1840. 

The church, well kept and shapely, 
stands where another with high pulpit, 
doors upon three sides, no steeple, no 



354 AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 



chimney and unpainted, stood in 1769. 
Within the old church, people in the pews 
sat face to face as in an omnibus, and 
many of them no doubt, were on their 
way to glory. The longest pastorate was 
that of Rev. Peter Starr, from 1772 to 
1829. He was a member of the Yale 
corporation, some of whose now pro- 
ductive lands lie close by in his parish. 
He made three preaching tours into Ver- 
mont and stirred as well the spirit of his 





■■ '■!-.. 



BUSHNELE'S STONE WALL. 



flock at home, and made them ready for 
the Revolution. This church had men 
of worth beyond the early years. In 
1865 died Dea. William Hopkins, aged 
97, who from the discourses preached 
about him, must have been not only of a 
fine personal appearance but in character 
all that was kind and good. This was a 
famous church for deacons if the following 
incident related at Litchfield in 1852 is 
true. A Dr. Tompson of New London 
travelling west, spent a sabbath in Warren 
at the public house. He attended church 
unknown. A well dressed, dignified 
person ascended the pulpit and in good 
style performed the service of that place ; 
prayer, psalm and sermon came forth as 
from a workman needing not to be 
ashamed. A prayer was offered for the 
absent aged pastor. In the afternoon the 
pulpit was occupied by another, equally 
able and happy in his performance of the 
duties of the place, and he prayed too for 



the absent pastor. On returning to the 
public house Dr. Tompson remarked, 
" you have an abundance of clergy in this 
town, — two present to-day and one 
absent." "Oh," was the reply, "those 
whom you have heard today are our two 
deacons." 

Chas. G. Finney says that his father 
removed from Warren when he was about 
two years old and went to Oneida County, 
N. Y. But he speaks of several visits to 
Connecticut, and of attending a high 
school for a season. Some of this study 
must have been in Warren. The Warren 
Academy is still standing just south of the 
church and I talked with a man now 
living in Warren whose mother said she 
went to the Academy with Finney and 
that he was even then considered a very 
bright young man. 




THE BUSHNELE MIEE DAM. 

Dr. Sturtevant though not eleven on 
leaving Warren, recalls in his autobiogra- 
phy some things to the credit of his native 
town. The people were homogeneous, 
there was no rivalry of sect, the schools 
assured a rudimentary education to all. 
When serious illness came to any home, 
the benediction would not be pronounced 
on Sunday till nurses were supplied for 
each night in the week. He was received 
under the age of ten into the christian 
fellowship and speaks of the impressions 
made upon him by the sermons heard. 



AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 355 



Rev. Peter Starr arrested his attention 
little, but when from Litchfield, twelve 
miles to the east, the famous Lyman 
Beecher came on an exchange, the case 
was different, and he with older minds sat 
spell-bound under the enthusiastic fervor 
of that imaginative preacher. So much 
for the past of this place. Left off from 
the map of the railroads, it has yet played 
its part in the life of the world. 

Illustrious men were all about upon 
these Litchfield Hills. Not only Beecher 
and in later years, his children, Harriet, 
Henry Ward, Charles, and Thomas, all 
born in Litchfield, a place where Henry 
Ward later said " it almost required 
medicinal help to get sick;" but in the 
former century, Joseph Bellamy the learned 
divine at Bethlehem, and Ethan Allen 
surer of his fame through Ticonderoga 
than through theology, and Tapping Reeve 
the founder of the law school, bringing 
with him on occasion Aaron Burr, the 
brother of his wife. This is good hunting 
ground for sons and daughters of the 
Revolution. But even here though the 
family thread does not " end in a loop of 
stronger twine," it is certainly " waxed at 
the other end by some plebian vocation." 

Count Rochambeau and Lafayette paid 
visits to these hills, and at Litchfield 
Washington is said to have heard of 
Arnold's treason. As he goes on his way 
to West Point he passes a night twelve 
miles to the southwest, in the neighbor- 
hood of Waramaug. The house was that 
of Major William Cogswell, captain of a 
company under Washington at Long 
Island, and was built about 1760. It is 
now owned by Mr. Gould Whittlesey who, 
as sunny, capacious, and well preserved 
as the house, proves with certitude that 
Washington slept once within its walls. A 
few rods to the west of this house, dis- 
closed to us as long prayers ought to be, 
in sections, lies the village. But unlike 



the prayers every turn in its tortuous 
streets is a surprise. Here one may well 
ask "how the other nine-tenths live." 

Hills, stream and boulders here main- 
tain their rights against all assaults of 
man. Build if you choose a city house, 
around the corner you are in the country. 
You do not go to the other side of the 
street to call, there isn't any other side of 
the street. Directions are impossible. 
You keep going and then " turn down 
indirectly to the place." Step out from 
a home of culture and you are under the 







THE OI,D CHURCH ON NEW PRESTON HIU,. 

spray of a small edition of Minnehaha 
Falls. Ox-teams are at the grist mill, 
flanking the store, where at metropolitan 
prices you may buy candy, cheese or a 
suit of clothes. While waiting for the 
mail you may fish for minnows. But this 
community has no apologies to offer. 
While the railroad even now stays respect- 
fully five miles away, it has sent out costly 
contributions to the world. It is such 
places as these that have given New 
England its name on the earth. Where 
men live seems to tell us something of 



356 AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 



what they are. These rural villages 
among the locks and woods ! Would that 
more boys could live in them ; where in a 
testing of lungs against the breeze, and of 




THE DISTRICT SCHOOE. 

legs upon the steep roads, the sense of 
mastery might waken also in the mind ! 

Follow along this ridge less than two 
miles to the southwest and there was 
Nathaniel W. Taylor born, the leader in 
the New England Theology of this cen- 
tury. But why go from the village itself? 
Read what a native says of this his own 
town. It was in a speech delivered before 
the legislature of Connecticut, at the 
inauguration of the New Britain Normal 
School, June 4, 185 1. " Let me," he says, 
" give you the picture of a little obscure 
parish in Litchfield County ; and I hope 
you will pardon me if I do it, as I must, 
with a degree of personal satisfaction ; 
for it is not any very bad vice in a son to 
be satisfied with his parentage. This little 
parish is made up of the corners of three 
towns, and the ragged ends and corners 
of twice as many mountains and stony- 
sided hills. But this rough, wild region, 
bears a race of healthy-minded, healthy- 
bodied, industrious and religious people. 
They love to educate their sons and God 
gives them their reward. Out of this little, 
obscure nook among the mountains, have 
come forth two presidents of colleges, the 
two that a few years ago presided, at the 



same time, over the two institutions, Yale 
and Washington (now Trinity). Besides 
these they have furnished a Secretary of 
State for the commonwealth, during a 
quarter of a century or more. Also a 
Solicitor, commonly known as the Cato of 
the United States Treasury. Also a mem- 
ber of Congress. Also a distinguished 
professor. And besides these a greater 
number of lawyers, physicians, preachers 
and teachers, both male and female, than 
I am now able to enumerate. Probably 
some of you have never so much as heard 
the name of this little by-place on the 
map of Connecticut ; generally it is not 
on the maps at all ; but how many cities 
are there of 20,000 inhabitants in our 
country, that have not exerted one-half 
the influence on mankind. The power of 
this little parish, it is not too much to say, 
is felt in every part of our great nation. 
Recognized, of course, it is not ; but still 
it is felt." 

Such is Horace Bushnell's tribute to 
those who trod these hills before him. 
Without enlarging upon their history and 
record; the Days, Whittleseys, Taylors, 
Goulds, among these to whom he refers, 
why not call to mind some memorials of 




THE ABANDONED FARM HOUSE. 

Dr. Bushnell himself? He was born here 
in 1802, and many are the people who 
remember him well in the days of his 
power. An old gentleman took me to the 



AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 357 



fork of the road just out of the village and 
outlined the location of the school-house 
where Bushnell first attended. 

It has been said that where the land in 
New England is too poor to raise corn 
they planted school-houses to raise men. 
It needs but one glance over the rough 
acres owned by BushnelPs father to make 
sure they were not favorable soil for 
corn. Horace had his trials with the 
rocks ; you may now be shown by the 
present polite owner the heavy walls laid 
by Bushnell's hands when a lad. Horace's 



of his preparation for the ministry. Dur- 
ing his licentiate days he was admired at 
the home church as a preacher. He was, 
from the first, original and bold in his 
thinking, brilliant and vigorous in style. 
A man still living among the scenes of his 
youth told me what a profound impres- 
sion was made on him by hearing Bush- 
nell, several years his senior, preach. 
"He was not," to quote his words, "like 
anybody else ; of medium height, rich, 
splendid voice, independent manner, 
putting fire and action into his sermons." 




father was a clothier and owned a small 
mill on the stream which now furrows its 
same deep coarse through the town. The 
mill and the dam are still used and there 
is precept as well as history in the thought 
that Bushnell's hands, ere he was 18 years 
of age, helped to roll from their original 
useless hillside beds the massive stones, 
and to place them in the dam where they 
lie today for the profit Of man. Bushnell 
was late in getting to college, graduating 
at Yale in 1827, where he was tutor 1829- 
1831, during which time occurred his 
remarkable conversion and the opening 



In the old stone church on New 
Preston hill, Bushnell preached his first 
sermon, while his mother, as she told her 
neighbors, trembled for him. Toward 
the close of his seminary course, in this 
same church he was preaching, when 
home on a vacation. A thunder storm 
came up and in the midst of the sermon, 
which was on the judgments of heaven 
which might some day befall men, the 
building was struck by lightning. One 
who was present told me he vividly 
remembered the hour ; how the girls in 
the gallery trembled, and then with the 



358 AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECT/CUT. 



rest of the congregation scurried for the 
door. The stove pipes around the room 
were supported by hooks and iron rods 
from the posts. The' electricity coming 
along the pipes severely shocked a good 
deacon who sat by one of the posts, but 
on being taken to an adjoining house he 
recovered consciousness. Part of the 
charge killed a boy outside the church 
and several were thrown prostrate. How- 
ever, my informer said that the audience 
shortly returned and that Bushnell, with a 
brief reference to the celestial emphasis 
put upon his sermon, finished the dis- 
course beginning at just the point where 
he was so suddenly interrupted. 

It is not in order here to discuss the 
nature or value of Horace Bushnell's con- 
tribution to theology. It was vigorously 
assailed and also championed while he 
lived, but has been rather cherished since 
he died. It is sufficiently fine, frank and 
vivid to be always fascinating and to make 
any event or place connected with the 
man, conspicuous. 

While he wrought in his sole pastorate 
at Hartford, New England Theology was 
divided between the rival schools of 
Nathaniel W. Taylor, born as we have seen 
near Bushnell's home, representing what 
was called the " New Divinity " of Yale, 
and that of Bennett Tyler, professor of 
Christian Theology at the seminary newly 
founded at East Windsor Hill. Bushnell 
was in a sense indifferent to any school 
and some have called him too much of a 
poet and too original for any theology. 
As to this we may in closing what we have 
to say about him refer to his 20th Anni- 
versary Discourse delivered before the 
North Church, Hartford (now Park 
Church), May 22, 1853. He arrived in 
Hartford for his first Sunday in a snow 
storm, and coming to one member's house 
was much disturbed to be removed before 
he got warm to another. Here is the way 



he explained it. "There were two parties 
strongly marked in the church, an old and 
a new school party as related to the New 
Haven controversy, and the committee 
had made up their minds very prudently 
that it would not do for me to stay even 
for an hour with the new school brother 
of the committee and for this reason they 
had made interest with the elder brother 
referred to because he was a man of the 
school simply of Jesus Christ. And here I 
was put in hospital and kept away from the 
infected districts preparatory to a settle- 
ment in the North Church of Hartford." 
I mention this fact to show the very deli- 
cate condition prepared for the young 
pastor who is thus daintily to be inserted 
between an acid and an alkali, having it 
for his task both to keep them apart and 
to save himself from being bitten of one 
or devoured by the other. 

Before leaving these hills around Wara- 
maug, interesting not more for themselves 
than for the men who have lived among 
them, let us turn to the country school 
house where these men and the many 
more less illustrious received their first 
lessons. It is noticeable what differing 
opinions great men have had of the 
country school. Lowell has made us 
somewhat acquainted with the building 
and more with the dame who taught 
within — 
" Propped on the marsh, a dwelling now 

I see, 
The humble school house of my A, B, C. 

T yfc ?fc vfc 

Ah dear old times ! there once it was 

my hap, 
Perched on a stool, to wear the long-eared 
cap ! " 
But for our purpose it is sufficient to 
take simply the testimony of the men 
mentioned in this article. 

Living in towns situated at the points 
of a scalene triangle, the longest side of 



AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 359 



which does not exceed twelve miles, and 
born not twelve years apart, the schools 
with which Sturtevant, Beecher and Bush- 
nell were familiar could not have been 
very different. But see what they said 
about them ! Dr. Sturtevant writes in his 
autobiography of the Warren school days, 
"As I compare the school experiences of 
the first eleven years of my life with what 
I should have enjoyed in the costly and 
much lauded public schools of the present 
day, I must frankly confess that I greatly 



visits of the pastor, always a college 
graduate, and his encouragement to the 
cause of education, and of his pleasure 
when it became the turn of his family 
to have the school teacher board with 
them, walking the one and a half miles to 
and from school in his company in winter 
and hers in summer. And in conclusion 
he says, " I am confident that I finished 
the first twelve years of my life sounder in 
mind and purer in morals and more robust 
for future mental acquisition, than I should 




THE USELESS MIIvI* WHEEE. 



prefer the schools of seventy years ago to 
those now found in most of our large 
cities. I do not believe it would have 
been better to have substituted for the 
rude and simple arrangement of the Con- 
necticut district school of 181 5, a little 
arithmetic, a little geography, a little 
diluted and simplified physical science 
and a little of almost everything else ad- 
ministered in the manner of modern 
times." He says he learned the " impor- 
tant lesson of obedience to properly con- 
stituted authority." He speaks of the 



have done had the last five of those years 
been spent in a modern graded school 
with all the latest improvements." 

How different is the testimony of Henry 
Ward Beecher. He writes in the Star 
Papers a school reminiscence and says, 
" It was our misfortune in boyhood to go 
to a district school," (This must refer to 
some school on Litchfield Hills for at the 
age of thirteen his father took the family 
to Boston.) " certainly we were never 
sent for any such absurd purpose as an 
education. We were read and spelled 



360 AWAY FROM THE RAILROAD IN CONNECTICUT. 



twice a day, unless something happened 
to prevent, which did happen about every 
other day. For the rest of the time we 
were busy in keeping still. Oh, dear ! 
Can there be anything worse for a lively, 
mercurial, mirthful, active little boy, than 
going to a winter district school? Yes, 
going to a summer district school ! There 
is no comparison. The last is the Miltonic 
depth below the deepest depth." "Gen- 
erally," he says, "the barrenest spot is 
chosen as a location for its school house, 
the most utterly homely building is erected 
without a tree or shrub and there those 
who can do no better pass the pilgrimage 
of their childhood education." In his 
case " not a tree was there to shelter the 
house: the sun beat down on the clap- 
boards till the pine knots shed pitchy 
tears, and the air was redolent of warm 
pine-wood smell." In conclusion, while 
admitting his prejudice he writes : " We 
abhor the thought of schools. We do not 
go into them if we can avoid it. Our 
boyhood experience has pervaded our 
memory with such images as breed a 
private repugnance to district schools, 
which we fear we shall not lay aside until 
we lay aside everything into the grave. 
We are sincerely glad that it is not so with 
everybody. There are thousands who re- 
vert with pleasure to those days. We are 
glad of it, but we look on such people 
with astonishment." 

And now at the third angle is Bushnell. 
He reverts to the practice of boarding the 
teacher around ; of the wood brought by 
the fathers to the school house in quantity 
according to the several quantities of 
children, and describes like the other 
the school building, " the seats made of the 
outer slabs from the saw mill, supported 
by slant legs driven into and a proper 
distance through augur holes, and planed 
smooth on the top by the rather tardy 
process of friction," and then exclaims, 



"O I remember (about the remotest 
thing I can remember) that low seat, too 
high nevertheless to allow the feet to touch 
the floor, and that friendly teacher who 
had the address to start a first feeling of 
enthusiasm and awaken the first sense of 
power. He is living still and whenever I 
think of him he rises up to me in the far 
back ground of memory as bright as if he 
had worn the seven stars in his hair." And 
at this point (for the address was delivered 
at the Litchfield Centennial Celebration, 
Aug. 14, 185 1,) an auditor told me, Dr. 
Bushnell paused and fixing his eye on an 
old man before him in the audience 
pointed at him with an outstretched arm, 
and with a burst of feeling that almost 
choked his voice, said, I said he was living, 
yes, he is here today, God bless him. 

To some the thought of what has been 
will only waken sadness as they visit these 
by-ways of New England. The abandoned 
farm house with its front yard given to the 
growth of black-berries ; the broken mill 
wheel rotting on the stream tell their 
pathetic story of declining power. But 
there is a conservatism of energy in society 
as well as in nature, and in those valleys 
there are many mill wheels turning yet. 
When John Randolph of Virginia saw a 
drove of mules passing through Washing- 
ton on their way to the south, it is said, 
he bantered Marcy of Connecticut with 
the remark, " there go some of your con- 
stituents." "Yes," quickly retorted 
Marcy, "going to Virginia to teach school." 

The mental and moral wealth of New 
England has been making the world rich* 
The strength of these hills has reappeared 
in New York, Ohio, Iowa, Illinois and the 
Dakotas. It lives in colleges, and laws, 
and churches north and south, and blesses 
those who dwell on the shores of seas that 
are pacific. Only a listless traveler will 
drive along these roads or rest beside 
these lakes and not remember this. No 



THE PARTING. 361 

town lives to itself. Its glory is to pro- Even now the spirit of the fathers comes 

duce men, and a man is the world's com- anew to greet the hills. Transmuted into 

mon property. The men who climbed modern life and recognizing new con- 

these hills and cleared the little spaces for ditions it builds a house of refuge on the 

their homes and for God's house of prayer mountain's side and homes for tired city 

were builders of a nation. Searching for girls upon the streams. We do not need 

their graves beneath the pines, among the again the "Age of Homespun " of which 

bushes and the overgrowing weeds, far our Horace Bushnell wrote so feelingly ; 

from the roadways, and even in neglected but we shall always need the sense of 

pastures, one may ask for an " Old Mor- homage and the grace of thankfulness. If 

tality " to chisel out anew their names one would have these wakened in him, let 

upon the blackened slab or crumbling him muse awhile in some such region as 

marble ; but their soul is marching on. this article has but imperfectly described. 



THE PARTING. 



BY CHARLES G. GIRELIUS. 



And must you go? God-speed, then. But to me 
This life will seem not half so gay : 

Our paths divide, but may they meet again — 
Some other place, some other day. 

'Tis sad to part, but friends cannot always 
Walk side by side, or sit and chat : 

The deviating paths of this poor life 

Wind in and out, this way and that. 

Sometimes alone and sad we wonder on — 
No friend to cheer the fainting heart, 

No hand to smooth the rugged path of toil, 
No smile to bid our tears depart. 

'Tis sad to struggle thus alone, and yet 
It would be well, if we but knew — 

Beyond a question or a painful doubt — 

That friends, though absent, still were true. 

I wish you all the joys that fortune gives : 
Are these denied, then better still — 

Perhaps, though less desired — a fearless heart, 
And strength to bear life's every ill. 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



THE MAN WHO MIGHT HAVE BEEN PRESIDENT. 



BY MARCUS A. CASEY. 



THERE are doubtless numerous per- 
sons, who are not aware that a man, 
who ever took pride in the fact that Con- 
necticut was his birthplace, once had the 
presidency of the United States within his 
grasp, but declined the honor. For such 
this sketch has been prepared. As a 
citizen of Connecticut has never occupied 
the presidential chair, the elevation of the 
man referred to would naturally have been 
regarded as somewhat of an honor to our 
good old state. It was only because of 
an innate modesty, a delicate sense of 
honor, and a most unswerving loyalty to 
a distinguished personal friend, that he 
was not nominated and elected. Had he 
lived in the state of his birth in modern 
times, and the same opportunity had 
occurred, his action might have been 
different. Men are hardly so modest and 
magnanimous in these "advanced" days. 
The Democratic national convention of 
1852 was held at Baltimore in June. The 
delegates from Connecticut were James T. 
Pratt, William P. Burrall, Ephraim H. 
Hyde, Minott A. Osborn, John W. Sted- 
man, and Frederick Chittenden. A dele- 
gate from the State of New York had 
steadily received votes from the com- 



mencement of balloting. On the fifth day 
of the convention, on the call of the states 
for the thirty-fourth ballot for a presiden- 
tial candidate, the Virginia delegation, 
which had retired for consultation, came 
in and cast the fifteen votes of that state 
for the gentleman from New York. This 
action was received with great favor. The 
honored delegate, by general consent, at 
once took the floor, and addressed the 
convention as follows : 

'■' Mr. President : I came not here to 
speak ; but I should be much more or 
much less than human, if I could, under 
these circumstances, be silent — if I could 
arise and address this convention without 
the very deepest emotion. I came here 
not for myself, but as the representative 
of others, clothed with the highest func- 
tions, which it shall be my chief ambition 
to discharge. I came here not with in- 
structions, but with expectations stronger 
than instructions, that I would vote for 
and endeavor to procure the nomination 
of that distinguished citizen and statesman, 
General Lewis Cass, of Michigan.* 

" I have enjoyed the highest honors the 
sovereignty of my state could confer, and 
I have seen times when, in the discharge 



Note — The writer, in boyhood, had frequent opportunities to listen to the eloquence 
of the subject of this sketch, both in the court-room and upon the public platform. A 
memoir by his brother, the Congressional Records, and information obtained from many 
sources, have been invaluable in the preparation of this much delayed tribute to the 
memory of a son of Connecticut. 

* At this point a number of magnificent bouquets were thrown upon and about the 
speaker by ladies in the galleries, and loud and long continued was the applause. 

362 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



363 



of public duties, I have been covered with 
revilings ; yet, amid all the varied re- 
sponsibilities of life, I have never ex- 
perienced an occasion so trying as this. 
But should I hesitate or waver? No, Mr. 
President ! From the time I took my 
seat in this convention, men who never 
knew me, men who never before had 
seen me, cast for me their votes from the 
beginning. Well may I feel proud of this, 
and claim it as a rosebud in the wreath of 
political destiny. And now I see the land 
of presidents — the ancient Dominion — 
coming here and laying her highest honors 
at my feet. Virginia, the land of chivalry, 
the land of generosity, the land of high 
and noble impulses — a land of all others 
willing to rescue my name from every 
imputation. I cherish her vote as of the 
highest worth and import. As an offering 
unsought, unrequested, opposed to my 
own wishes, it has been brought to me, 
and is, therefore, the more precious. But 
while I thus prize, and shall hold in grate- 
ful remembrance to my last hour, a com- 
pliment in every respect so distinguished, 
I could not consent to a nomination here 
without incurring the imputation of un- 
faithfully executing the trust committed 
to me by my constituents — without turn- 
ing my back upon an old and valued 
friend. Nothing that could be offered 
me — not even the highest position in the 
government, the office of President of the 
United States — could compensate me for 
such a desertion of my trust. I could 
receive no higher compliment than has 
here been tendered me, but I cannot 
hesitate in the discharge of my duty. I 
would say to my Virginia friends that T 
shall go home a prouder, if not a better 
man. And may I not ask my friends, the 
representatives of the Old Dominion, who 
have by their generous action stayed up 
my hands, may I not successfully invoke 
them, by all the history of the past, by the 



rich fruition of the present, and the glorious 
hopes of the future of our country, to go 
with me for the nomination of one who 
has been abundantly tried and ever found 
faithful, Lewis Cass, of Michigan. We 
cannot find a single individual acceptable 
to us all. Every one can pass criticisms 
upon opposing candidates. None are 
perfect. There are many stars in the 
galaxy. Let us then cease our struggles 
and act in a spirit of forbearance, con- 
ciliation, and compromise. 

" I tender my most grateful thanks to 
my friends for the choice offering they 
have brought me, and congratulate them 
and all other friends upon the good 
temper that prevails in this convention. 
I ask them not to expect me to depart 
from the line of my intentions, and I 
know they will not. My spirit is willing, 
and the flesh is not weak ; the highest 
temptation, I repeat, could not induce me 
to depart from this course." 

The speaker was Daniel S. Dickinson. 

Of the gentlemen who addressed the 
convention with reference to Mr. Dickin- 
son's declination, Mr. Leake, of Virginia, 
remarked that, in the words of a distin- 
guished statesman, the presidency was 
neither to be sought for nor declined. 
The fact that the gentleman from New 
York had declined the nomination was the 
highest argument in his favor. 

On the thirty-fifth ballot the Virginia 
delegation cast the vote of that state for 
Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, and 
on the forty-ninth ballot he was nomi- 
nated. 

Pierce and King were elected in the 
following November by an overwhelming 
majority, the Whig candidates, Scott and 
Graham, receiving the electoral votes of 
but four states — Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Kentucky and Tennessee. The result was 
the annihilation of the Whig party as a 
factor in American politics. 



3^4 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT 



Had Mr. Dickinson been nominated 
and elected, it is probable that American 
history from that time forth would have 
been somewhat different. He might have 
been able to stem the tide of growing 
hostilities between the old-time North and 
South upon the slavery question, but the 
inevitable result could only have been 
postponed. The election of Pierce may 
now well be regarded as providential, as 
it undoubtedly tended to hasten the tragic 
events that occurred in the sixties, which 
might otherwise have been precipitated 
upon another generation. 




DANIEI* S. DICKINSON. 
(This portrait of Mr. Dickinson was obtained from his 
daughter, Mrs. Courtney, by Hon. Jerome DeWitt, 
Mayor of Binghamton, N. Y.) 

Daniel Stevens Dickinson was born in 
Goshen, Litchfield county, September n, 
1800. In boyhood, with the other mem- 
bers of the family, he removed to Che- 
nango county, New York, settling in the 
locality which later became the town of 
Guilford. The hardships, adventures, and 
privations of pioneer life were there en- 
countered. But the family brought to 



their new home their New England love 
for social order and improvement. The 
first school organized in the neighborhood 
was taught in a room of their dwelling. 
By nature a student, Daniel succeeded in 
laying the foundation of a thoroughly 
practical education ; and from this begin- 
ning, by pursuing a system of energetic 
self-culture and extensive reading, aided 
by an exceptionally fine literary taste, he 
ultimately became a ripe scholar, well 
versed in the classics, and familiar with 
history, poetry, political economy, and the 
various branches of science and literature. 
He was a teacher in various schools for 
about five years, and during that period 
became a practical land-surveyor. 

About 1825 Mr. Dickinson began the 
study of law at Norwich, N. Y. In 1828 
he was about to ask the Court of Common 
Pleas to admit him to the bar, when he 
learned that his admission would be op- 
posed because he had pursued his studies 
in too " private " a manner. He then went 
to Albany and applied to the Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court, who caused him 
to be examined, and he was admitted to 
practice in all the courts of the state. In 
1 83 1 he removed to Binghamton. Here 
he entered upon a large legal practice, 
and soon took rank among the prominent 
lawyers of the state. 

Mr. Dickinson had ever been a devoted 
student of the Bible, and his frequent 
allusions to biblical personages and events, 
in the course of his arguments, won for 
him the appellation of " Scripture Dick ' ' 
among his brother practitioners. Mr. 
Dickinson's power before a jury was 
something marvelous, and his magnetic 
presence, and clear, ringing voice, never 
failed to enlist the sympathies of an audi- 
ence at the very beginning of his remarks. 
Toward the close of his life, his venerable 
appearance, his long, snow-white hair, and 
the benign expression upon his coun- 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



365 



tenance, together with that pathetic 
eloquence which only an old man can be 
possessed of, caused him to be well-nigh 
worshipped by the assemblages which 
gathered to hear him speak. 

In 1834, Mr Dickinson was elected 
the first president of the municipal organ- 
ization of Binghamton. He was a member 
of the Democratic national convention at 
Baltimore in 1835, which nominated Van 
Buren and Johnson. He was elected to 
the State Senate in 1836, and served, as 
senator and member of the court for the 




DANIEL STEVENS DICKINSON. 

(This early portrait, copied from a daguerreotype, was 
furnished by D. C. Kilbourn, Esq., of Litchfield.) 

correction of errors, for four years. In 
1840 he was nominated for lieutenant- 
governor. The whole Democratic ticket, 
state and national, was defeated, though 
Mr. Dickinson received five thousand 
more votes in the state than the presiden- 
tial electors. His name was again brought 
foward in 1842, and although he published 
a letter of declination, he was nominated, 
and elected by twenty-five thousand 
majority. As lieutenant-governor he be- 
26 



came president of the senate, presiding 
judge of the court of errors, member of 
the canal board, etc. 

In the presidential campaign of 1844 he 
was a delegate to the Democratic national 
convention, and afterward took an active 
part in the canvass for Polk and Dallas, a 
prominent issue in the campaign being 
the annexation of Texas. He was one of 
the state electors, and assisted in casting 
the vote of New York for the successful 
candidates. In December of the same 
year Governor Bouck appointed him 
United States Senator, in place of Hon. 
N. P. Tallmadge, who had resigned. The 
state legislature elected Mr. Dickinson for 
the succeeding regular term of six years, 
which expired March 3, 1851. He was 
chairman of the committee of finance, and 
took a conspicuous part in all prominent 
measures, including the annexation of 
Texas, the war with Mexico, the settle- 
ment of the Oregon difficulty with Great 
Britain, the Clayton-Bulwer treaty, the 
questions growing out of the acquisition 
of territory, the compromise measures of 
1850, and the formation of governments 
for New Mexico, California, and Oregon. 
His first effort of importance in the 
Senate was a speech in advocacy of the 
annexation of Texas. 

It may be of interest at the present 
time to recall the fact that Mr. Dickinson 
was always something of an "expansion- 
ist." In a speech delivered in 1849 ne 
said : " I saw an empire on the north 
coming in ; and whilst I declare myself in 
favor of the accession at the earliest 
practicable moment, no one, I hope, fears 
that I expect to extend slavery there, or, 
because I am in favor of annexing this, 
that there is no other direction in which 
this Union is to expand. [A voice : ' Is 
it Cuba?'] Yes; Cuba and Canada both. 
Let the one take care of itself. We'll take 
the other first." 



366 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



In 1848 Mr. Dickinson was a member 
of the convention which nominated Lewis 
Cass for the presidency, who was defeated 
by the popular military hero of the hour, 
General Zachary Taylor. 

In the session of 1850. the excitement 
growing out of the question of slavery in 
the territories having increased to an 
alarming extent, both in and out of 
Congress, Henry Clay introduced in the 
Senate a proposition for "an amicable 
arrangement of all questions in contro- 
versy between the free and the slave states, 
growing out of the subject of slavery." A 
select committee of thirteen was organized, 
to which the whole matter was referred. 
Mr. Dickinson was a member of this 
committee. Besides Henry Clay, the 
chairman, Daniel Webster, General Cass, 
William R. King, John M. Clayton, and 
others of the oldest, ablest, and most 
conspicuous of the senators, were his 
associates. The consideration of this im- 
portant question continued during nearly 
eight months, and was brought to a close 
by the passage of bills admitting California 
as a State, defining the boundaries of 
Texas, organizing the territories of New 
Mexico and Utah by acts silent on the 
subject of slavery, prohibiting the slave 
trade in the district of Columbia, and 
amending the fugitive slave law. 

It was at the close of the session of 
1850 that Mr. Webster indited a letter to 
Mr. Dickinson which has long been re- 
garded as a most graceful and delicate 
exhibition of the best traits of a great and 
noble character. The unpleasant " occur- 
rences" alluded to by Mr. Webster were 
some sharp passages in debate which took 
place at an early period in their senatorial 
acquaintance. The following extract from 
the letter is an eloquent tribute to the 



character of the man to whom it was 
addressed : 

" In the earlier part of our acquaintance, 
my dear sir, occurrences took place, which 
I remember with constantly increasing 
regret and pain ; because the more I have 
known of you, the greater have been my 
esteem for your character and my respect 
for your talents. But it is your noble, 
able, manly, and patriotic conduct, in 
support of the great measures of this 
session, which has entirely won my heart 
and secured my highest regard. I hope 
you may live long to serve your country ; 
but I do not think you are ever likely to 
see a crisis, in which you may be able to 
do so much, either for your own dis- 
tinction or for the public good. You have 
stood, where others have fallen ; you have 
advanced with firm and manly step, where 
others have wavered, faltered, and fallen 
back ; and for one, I desire to thank you 
and to commend your conduct out of the 
fulness of an honest heart." * 

In August, 185 1, Mr. Dickinson 
addressed a large gathering at the 
Centennial Celebration of Litchfield 
county. During the two days devoted 
to the exercises an address was also 
delivered by Hon. Samuel Church, LL.jD., 
Chief Justice of the State, a poem was 
read by Rev. John Pierpont, which was 
followed by a discourse from Rev. Horace 
Bushnell, D. D. It was at this time that 
Mr. Dickinson revisited the scene of his 
childhood, in the town of Goshen. 

In 1853 Mr. Dickinson was appointed 
collector of the port of New York, but he 
declined the position. From the expira- 
tion of his senatorial term up to the 
breaking out of the rebellion, he was 
devoted mainly to his professional busi- 
ness and home pursuits. 



* In December, 1850, Mr. Webster addressed a note to Mr. Dickinson, requesting 
him to exert his influence in support of a certain measure. The concluding sentence 
was : " I pray you give the subject one of your beneficent smiles." 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



367 



After the election of Abraham Lincoln, 
and as the national political affairs began 
to assume a serious and threatening 
aspect, he exerted himself earnestly to 
avert the impending catastrophe. Unfor- 
tunately, as the people then generally 
believed, his and all other endeavors in 
that direction failed of success. 

The first gun fired at Sumpter aroused 
anew all his love for the Union. He was 
among the earliest of those who compre- 
hended the situation and came to the 
support of the government, though the 
administration had not been of his party 
nor of his choice. He made the opening 
speech from the principal stand in front 
of the Washington monument in Union 
Square, at the great mass meeting held in 
New York, April 20, 1861, at which 
Genera] John A. Dix presided ; and from 
that time onward he devoted himself un- 
sparingly to the work, speaking day after 
day, frequently twice on the same day, 
with great popular effect, to large assem- 
blages of the people in New York state, 
in New England, New Jersey,Pennsylvania, 
and some of the western states. He spoke 
in Connecticut several times during the 
war, as many will remember. While 
rallying his fellow citizens, of all classes, 
to the support of the government, he took 
decided ground against keeping up party 
divisions — exhorting all loyal men, of 
whatever party, to come to the aid of the 
administration. 

Mr. Dickinson participated actively in 
raising troops for the war in the vicinity of 
his home. The 89th N. Y. Volunteers, 
enlisted under authority granted to him 
from the war department, was named in 
his honor "The Dickinson Guard," to 
which he presented a stand of colors. A 
battery raised at Binghamton and vicinity 
also bore his name. 



In 186 1 Mr. Dickinson was elected 
Attorney General of the State of New 
York upon the Union ticket, which was 
elected by a majority of over one hundred 
thousand votes. In 1862 the name of 
Mr. Dickinson was used in connection 
with the gubernatorial nomination, but 
without his wish or encouragement. He 
supported, with all his zeal, the lamented 
and patriotic General James S. Wadsworth, 
the Union nominee. 

Prior to the State election of 1863, Mr. 
Dickinson declined a renomination for 
the office of Attorney-General. He was 
nominated by President Lincoln upon the 
joint commission to arrange indemnities 
arising under the settlement of the North- 
western boundary between the United 
States and Great Britain, and the nomina- 
tion was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate without the usual reference ; but 
the position was declined. In December 
of the same year, Governor Fenton 
tendered him a seat upon the bench of 
the Court of Appeals, but that appointment 
was declined also. 

The last of Mr. Dickinson's "campaign- 
ing" was in the year 1864, when he 
labored unceasingly for the ree'lection of 
Abraham Lincoln.* Undoubtedly the 
fatigue and extraordinary exertions inci- 
dent to this campaign did much to 
undermine his naturally vigorous constitu- 
tion and hasten his untimely end. From 
that time he aged rapidly, appearing fully 
ten years older than he really was at the 
time of his death. 

In the spring of 1865, and among the 
last of his public acts, President Lincoln 
tendered to Mr. Dickinson the office of 
United States District Attorney for the 
Southern District of New York. Though 
unsolicited and unexpected, the appoint- 
ment was accepted, and from that time to 



* In the Baltimore convention, which renominated Lincoln, Mr. Dickinson received 
109 votes for Vice-President on the first ballot. History has recorded that Andrew 
Johnson received the nomination. 



368 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



the close of his life he was actively 
engaged in the discharge of the duties of 
that important office. His death occurred 
suddenly April 12, 1866, at the residence 
of his son-in-law, Samuel G. Courtney, 
Esq., in New York city. Though he was 
denied the fondly cherished hope that he 
would be permitted to die in his own 
home at Binghamton, long known as "The 
Orchard," yet his second desire, to be 
laid in Spring Forest cemetery, so near, 
was not denied him. 

Had not Mr. Dickinson's life been 
almost wholly devoted to public and pro- 
fessional duties, he might undoubtedly 
have become a poet of distinction. An 
early and learned friend wrote of him : 
" Mr. Dickinson was a born poet." The 
best known of his poetical compositions 
are: "To Lydia " (his wife), "Come to 
my Grave Alone," " There is a Time," 
"To Bessie Boyd," "Lines written in 
1841," "The Spirit Land," "Ode for the 
Times,"* " I'm Growing Gray," and the 
" Song of the Perished Elm." 

An extract from an address by Mr. 
Dickinson on the anniversary of the adop- 
tion of the Constitution of the United 
States, delivered on the park (now Bush- 
nell park) in Hartford, September 17, 
1 86 1, will show in what " fond recollec- 
tion " and reverence he held the state of 
his birth : 

" Were I to remain unmoved by deep 
emotion, upon an occasion so replete with 
interest, after an introduction so kind,f 
and a reception so flattering, I might well 
be deemed unappreciative and ungrateful ; 
and although utterance and expression 
may fail me, you have the assurance that 
my heart is touched by the honor ex- 



tended to me so generously, beyond the 
power of language to delineate. We have 
met together, my friends, to interchange 
opinions upon the principles of the govern- 
ment under which we live ; to speak of 
our beloved Union, now menaced with 
danger, and to contribute our influence to 
its preservation and perpetuity. 

" I come among you from another state 
under circumstances, to me, of peculiar 
interest. Early in the present century, a 
farmer of slender pecuniary means, but 
strong in generous and manly purpose 
and self-reliant industry, residing in a 
secluded and romantic section of this 
state, removed with his wife and a family 
of young children to the interior of New 
York, where the wilderness was but little 
broken by the habitations of man. There 
he rekindled his domestic altar-fires, and 
in the true spirit of his native state, for 
the first winter devoted the best part of 
his humble abode to the purposes of a 
common school, under a Connecticut 
teacher. Before his ' sturdy stroke ' the 
forest vanished, the wild beast was driven 
from his lair, and under the influence of 
his example the schoolhouse sprung up,, 
the church was reared, the cultivated field, 
the extended meadowand nodding harvest, 
greeted the eye of the traveller, and homes 
of comfort and gathering-places of affec- 
tion arose on every hand. Thus, in the 
hardy virtues and simple tastes of the 
primitive settlements, were his family- 
reared and educated, and among them a 
son aged six years at the time of his 
change of residence.. But years rolled 
onward, and 
'A change came o'er the spirit of my 

dream — 
The boy had changed to manhood,' 



* This spirited poem was written in February, 1864, in response to a question by a 
lady, " Are you for peace ? " Secretary of War Stanton secured the poem for publica- 
tion, and it was widely copied by the loyal press of the country. It was read by the 
tragedian Murdock before a large audience in the Senate Chamber, at the request of 
President Lincoln. 

t He was introduced to the audience by Mayor Henry C. Deming. 



A SON OF CONNECTICUT. 



369 



and had gone out to fight the battles of 
life. He had stood in senates and in 
forums with the most distinguished of the 
land ; had been laden with the world's 
honors, and time and bereavement had 
written care upon his brow, and silvered 
his head with the snows of life's approach- 
ing winter. He had revisited the home 
■of his birth and of his early years, when 
life had no disguises, hope no blights, and 
the roses along his pathway were thornless ; 
t>ut the cottage, like those he had first 
known there in the holy relation of 
parents, had mouldered to dust ; the wide 
stone hearth and broad fireplace were not 
there ; and where, alas ! were the little 
group who had gathered around them? 
The garden-plat could be traced by the 
fragment of stone wall remaining, but the 
damson-trees, and fennel-bed, and rose- 
bush, had perished. The little pathway 
to the old gate was obliterated, and the 
pattering of tiny feet was heard there no 
more ; some were walking the golden 
streets of Paradise, and some were yet 
lingering in paths that ' lead but to the 
grave.' The broad-leaved maples near 
the door had disappeared, and those who 
planted them, and sought their shade, 
were reposing under the shadow of that 
tree whose foliage is fadeless. The cool 
spring which gurgled from beneath the 



old gray rock, and danced along so 
merrily to the music of its own rippling, 
was there, but some of those who drank of 
its waters now drink of the waters of life, 
which flow out from the rock of ages. 
But the boy of six years has been spared, 
and has returned, covered with years, to 
discharge a sacred obligation of duty and 
affection — to cast his humble offering 
upon the lap of her who gave him birth, 
and sent him forth into the world, pro- 
tected by the angel wings of a mother's 
blessing. He has come to tell of his 
country's rise, to rejoice in her progress, 
to mourn over her present decline, and to 
unite in invocations to Heaven that he 
may not witness her downfall. 



" And now on taking leave, in the name 
of that Constitution which we all love and 
revere, in the name of this sacred Union 
of our fathers which shelters and protects 
us, for the honor and kindness extended 
me, and the attentions shown me upon 
this my return to my early home, I can 
only tender you the sincere tribute of an 
appreciative and gratelul heart. 

" ' Yon sun that sets upon the sea 

We follow in his flight : 
Farewell awhile to him and thee, 

My native land good night.' " 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



BY ISRAEL FOOTE LOOMIS. 



Part II. Middle Haddam Society 



ABOUT 1 710, says Rev. Dr. Field, a 
family named Goffe, who were the 
first English inhabitants in Middle Had- 
dam, settled south of Middle Haddam 
Landing. Capt. Cornelius Knowles, an 



support of settlers in new countries. 
About 1758 the ship building industry was 
started at the Landing, and became the 
leading business. The first ship built 
there was launched in the year 1763, and 



• ^ 




Kl if 






- ... . - m^. . 

congregational church and street view 




early settler, afterwards built a house at 
Middle Haddam Landing near the river, 
and the vicinity was known for years as 
"Knowles' Landing." Then other families 
settled on the ground adjacent to his place. 
The inhabitants sustained themselves in 
part by what they obtained from the river, 
and in other part and chiefly by cutting 
down the forest and tilling the ground, 
which has ever been the main reliance for 



from that time for three-quarters of a 
century this industry made a market for 
ship timber, brought from many miles 
around. People came from Hebron, 
Marlborough, Westchester, Haddam Neck 
and other places, bringing everything from 
keel to gunwale with which to construct 
the ships, which went to every sea. 

The first ships that went from America 
to Canton, China, for importing tea, were 



370 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



371 



built at this place. Many of the first and 
finest " London Packets," which were so 
popular at that date of ocean navigation, 
were built here, some of them b'eing 
finished in the interior with mahogany, 
black walnut, rosewood and other fine 
woods which were brought to port by 
vessels engaged in the West India trade. 
Up to the year 1840 fifty-one ships, twenty- 
four brigs, twenty-one schooners and 
fifteen sloops were built, amounting in all 
to twenty-seven thousand, four hundred 
and thirty tons. 



With the loss of the West India trade, 
business declined at this place. There 
was for some years a manufactory of house 
and sleigh-bells, also coffin trimmings, and 
four oakum factories. The latter business 
has been chiefly in the hands of the 
Tibbals family. They furnish oakum for 
all yards where ships are built, also for the 
Navy yards of the United States, for the 
use of caulkers. Caulking was one of the 
most important parts of ship building, 
previous to the use of iron and steel, in 
the manufacture of hulls. 




THE LANDING. 



Mr. Thomas Childs, a master builder 
who lived to be over ninety years of age, 
stated that he had been the master builder 
of two hundred and thirty-seven vessels, 
and that he built most of them at Middle 
Haddam ship yards. About 1850 this 
industry, which had done so much toward 
building up the place, declined. The 
Landing prospered more through this 
business than any other. Its leading 
citizens for many years had a large share 
in the commerce of the country, owned 
vessels and followed the sea, some as cap- 
tains and owners, and as other officers and 
sailors. 



The first settlers of Middle Haddam 
labored under great disadvantages in 
attending public worship on the Sabbath. 
Sometimes they went by the difficult paths 
over the "Straits Hills" to the sanctuary 
in Portland ; again by means of sailboats 
on the river, in the mild time of year, they 
went as near as they could to that sanctu- 
ary ; or in the same way to churches in 
Middletown and Haddam. The people 
of Haddam Neck also, living opposite 
Haddam, to which they then, as now, 
belonged, often found it difficult to cross 
the river to attend worship on Sunday, or 
town meetings. Neither were the inhabi- 



372 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



tants of these places well accommodated to 
meet together in their own limits. They 
were scattered among the hills, and bad 
roads, little better than Indian trails, were 
the means of reaching any portion of their 



• . 



parish, and the request was granted at the 
May session of the Assembly in 1740. 
The petitioners north of the " Neck " were 
twenty-six in number and those on the 
" Neck" were twelve. 

The church was organized Sept. 24, 
1740, consisting of thirteen members, 
seven of whom lived on the " Neck," and 
Rev. Benjamin Bowers, a native of 
Billerica, Mass., a graduate of Harvard 
College, was ordained and settled as 
their pastor. Mr. Bowers died May 11, 
1 761, aged 45. He left the reputation of 
having been a pious, faithful minister. 
At the time of the organization the people 
had no house erected for public worship. 




THE OI<D MILI,. MIDDIJ3 HADDAM. 



own parish. It was more convenient to 
meet together in their own borders than 
to go where they had hitherto gone, so 
they united in 1738 in a petition to the 
General Court for incorporation as a 



They met in the school houses and 
dwelling houses. Knowles' Landing, now 
Middle Haddam, began to be a place of 
some business not long afterwards, but it 
did not attain its present size till that 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



373 



generation, and many succeeding ones, 
had gone to their graves. The people 
united in a local center, and built a meet- 
ing house in 1744, 36x44 feet, in which 
they worshiped until 181 2, several years 
longer than they would have done had 
they been united in views as to the site of 
a second meeting house. 

Mr. Bowers was followed by Rev. Ben- 
jamin Boardman, a native of Westiield, a 
graduate of Yale, 1758; dean, scholar 
and tutor in that institution. He was 
ordained January 5, 1762. During his 
ministry, families liv- 
ing at M aromas, on 
the west side of the 
river, attended wor- 
ship in Middle Had- 
dam. In January, 
1775, the first soci- 
ety in Middletown 
granted these fami- 
lies leave to pay half 
of their society tax 
to the Middle Had- 
dam Society. The 
heads of families who 
thus attended wor- 
ship were Israel Car- 
rier, Francis Drake, 
John Cone, Simeon 
and Richard Morgan, 
Stephen and John Sears, Samuel Simmons 
and Mr. Swaddle. During this year Mr. 
Boardman went as chaplain to a military 
company from this town. They had a 
camp near Boston. Some difficulty arising 
between him and the people led to his 
dismission in 1783. On the 5th of May, 
1 784, he was installed pastor of the South 
Church, Hartford, where he died February 
12, 1 810, at 70 years of age. 

Other ministers were Revs. David 
Selden, Charles Bently, Stephen A. Loper, 
William Case, Philo Judson, James C. 
Houghton and William S. Wright. This 



brings the names to a date within the 
memory to those now living. 

An Episcopal church was formed in 
Middle Haddam in 1771 in the eastern 
part of the parish. The church at the 
Landing was formed April 25, 1785. 
Their church edifice was built in 1786-87. 
It was a mission under the care of Rev. 
Mr. Jarvis of Middletown, until 1791. In 
justice to them, it is but fair to say that 
the contributions made by a few individ- 
uals have kept this church alive. 

Not far from the station at Cobalt, is 




THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Great Hill, or Cobalt Mountain. The 
first Governor Winthrop appears to have 
believed that there were minerals in this 
locality, and was so confirmed in this 
belief that he thought of setting up works 
for improving them, as is evident from a 
grant made to him not long after the 
settlement of Middletown, which at that 
time, included Cromwell, Middlefield, 
Maromas, Portland and Chatham, extend- 
ing to the parish of Westchester on the 
east. His grant read as follows, to-wit : 
" The inhabitants of Middletown, for the 
encouragement of designs of our much 



374 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 




Houses." 
I)r. Field, 



RESIDENCE OK EEVI JEWETT, 

honored Governor, Mr. John Winthrop, 
for the discovery of mines and minerals, 
and for the setting up of such works as 
shall be needful for the improvement of 
them, do hereby grant unto our said Gov- 
ernor, any mines, or minerals, that he shall 
find or discover upon any common land 
within the bounds of our towns, and such 
woodland as may be convenient for the 
use of the same to the value of 500 or 
1,000 acres, so that it be not nearer than 
two or three miles from the present dwell- 
ing houses of the town, as the town shall 
judge to be least prejudicial; provided 
the town shall have free liberty of com- 
monage as far as our town 
bounds go, until the improvers 
shall see good to impropriate 
the same with inclosures — 
provided further that said 
Governor and such as may be 
co-improvers with him, will 
set up works to improve such 
mines and minerals as he shall 
find within these five years, 
and let us know whether he 
doth accept of this our grant 
within two years ; and so it 
be to him and his heirs and 
associates from the time of the 
setting up of such works, else |[|the dart^house. residence of the misses hyde. 



at two or five years, 
and then to be at the 
liberty of the town to 
grant the same to any 
other. 

"May 25, 1661." 
At the time of this 
grant the residents of 
Middletown dwelt 
within the bounds of 
the present city and 
the lower part of Crom- 
well, which at that 
time, or subsequently, 
was called the " Upper 
It is not probable," says Rev* 
that Governor Winthrop had 
any very strong impressions that he would 
find minerals excepting on or in the hills 
at the Straits, two or three miles below the 
present city of Middletown, where the 
Connecticut River seems to have long ago 
left its original course by which it emptied 
its waters into Long Island Sound, in the 
vicinity of New Haven, and burst through 
this ridge of hills at the Straits." In these 
hills, lead on the west side of the river, 
and cobalt on the east side, were after- 
wards very seriously, though unprofitably, 
sought. From the correspondence of the 




THE TOWN OF CHA THAM. 



375 



governor with learned men in England it 
is probable that knowledge of this locality 
went over the sea in his time. No effort, 
however seems to have been made to find 
gold or any other mineral at this place for a 
century after this grant was made. In 
1762 Prof. John Sebastian Stephauney, a 
German, employed some men, and made 
an opening into Great Hill for the purpose 
of finding mineral treasures. He worked 
only for a short time. In 1770 he re- 



of its character or value. The better 
informed believed that cobalt was the 
mineral sought. At last Erkelens again 
appeared as the principal manager, as 
appears from an entry in the diary of 
Presidents Stiles of Yale College. On 
Jan. 1, 1787, he notes as follows : "Mr. 
Erkelens visited me full of his cobalt 
mine, and China voyage. Some years 
ago he bought the ' Governor's Ring ' 
as it is called, a mountain in the north- 




THE CONNECTICUT FROM MIDDLE HADDAM. 



newed his attempt in company with two 
other German explorers, John Knool and 
Gominius Erkelens. Dr. Stephauney, at 
length retired and left the management of 
the work to Knool and Erkelens, reserving 
a share of the profits to himself. 

Many casks of the ore obtained were 
sent to England and Holland, and some 
taken to China. All the persons engaged 
as operatives or speculators were of foreign 
birth and speech, and as the ore was all 
exported very little was known at the time 



west corner of Middle Hadciam, com- 
prising about 800 acres. Here he finds 
plenty of cobalt which he manufactured 
into 'smalt' with which the beautiful blue 
on China ware and other pottery is made. 
Governor Trumbull has often told me that 
this was the place where Gov. Winthrop 
used to go with his servant, and after 
spending three or four weeks in the woods 
at this mountain in roasting and assaying 
metals and casting gold rings, would 
return to his home, in New London with 



376 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 





"THE WHITE FEYER." 

plenty of gold ; hence the place became 
known as 'The Governor's Ring.' Win- 
throp was in intimate correspondence with 
Sir Kenelm Digby, and the leading chemi- 
cal and philosophical men of his time, as 
may be seen in the 
fortieth volume of 
'Philosophical Trans- 
actions,' 1740." 

Erkelens expended 
two thousand pounds 
sterling in the mine, 
which was like many 
other mining ven- 
tures, of no profit. 
He made one ship- 
ment of twenty tons 
of ore to China. 
There is a good deal 
in the Chatham Rec- 
ords respecting these 
lands, and the opera- 



tions at Great Hill. Large sums of money 
have at different times been spent in at- 
tempts to obtain ore at this place. Mr. 
Seth Hunt from New Hampshire worked 
there from 181 8 to 1820, and spent his 
fortune to no avail. In 1844 Prof. Charles 
U. Shepard, author of " The Report on the 
Geological Survey of Connecticut," worked 
there. It is a curious fact, that after all 
that has been done at this mine, very little 
is really known to the public as to the worth 
of the minerals located there, and whether 
it could be worked to any profit. It is 
evident that the principal object which 
has been sought is cobalt. " Cobalt," says 
Prof. Johnston of Wesleyan University, 
" is . a rare metal, and is not used in the 
arts in a metallic state, but its oxid is 
used largely in preparing the beautiful 
blue coloring matter for painting glass 
and porcelain ware." "This locality," 
(at Great Hill) he adds, " is the only one 
known in this country where this peculiar 
ore of the metal is obtained, but in two or 
three places the oxid is found associated 
with oxid of manganese. At mine La 
Motte, Missouri, it occurs in sufficient 
quantity to be extracted from the ore for 
use in the arts." 







RESIDENCE OE HORACE JOHNSON. 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



377 



In March. 1S50. Mr. Edmund Brown 

with some friends began operations about 
the base of Great Hill, a little east of the 
place where previous operations had been 
carried on. He employed a large force 
an.i sunk a shaft seven by nine feet, about 
forty feet deep, and worked from the 
shaft for some sixty feet taking from the 
opening a large amount of ore. They 
then commenced a tunnel seven hundred 
feet east of the shaft and proceeded some 
forty feet westerly with the object of meet- 



In a communication from Dr. Franck- 
fort he says in regard to the work at Great 
Hill by the Germans and others, prior to 
Mr. Brown and his company, that they 
worked in the micaceous shale of that 
region with view of obtaining the smaltine, 
or cobalt pyrites, a silvery-white, fine- 
grained ore found here. The black 
peroxid of cobalt, extensively used in the 
making of blue pottery, fine smalt, etc. 
was the object which those who mined 
there had in view, and wished to prepare."' 




THE RIVER FROM THE HILL. 



ing and opening up the shaft, in the mean- 
time putting up stamping works, laboratory 
and smelting works. After working about 
a year, and expending a large sum of 
money, the company failed Dr. Franck- 
fort, a French chemist, made an analysis 
of the ore taken from the shaft. This 
analysis shows that the ore is properly 
speaking, an arsenical pyrites, containing 
80 per cent, of arsenic, 9 per cent, of iron, 
4^4 per cent, of sulphur, almost 4 per 
cent, of cobalt with a trace of bismuth. 



" This mineral,'' he adds, u is very rare in 
the United States, and there is no doubt 
whatever that the regular vein of it will 
amply pay for mining if it should be 
found." There has also been found a 
mineral called copper-nickel, of copper 
red color. 

President Stiles visited this place in 
1787 and sketched "The Governor's 
Ring - ' and a map showing the country 
from New London to Middle Haddam 
and Middletown. This he was prompted 



378 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



to do by the prospect that Great Hill 
afforded. The mine was near the bottom 
of the hill, being a short distance from it, 
at an elevation of about four hundred feet 
above the sea level of the Connecticut 
River, — the top of the hill rising nearly 
three hundred feet more. From the 
summit of this hill the view in every 
direction is one of great beauty, compris- 
ing the enchanting scenery of this part of 
the river in its windings, and the inland 
landscape. Upon the river we see vessels 
of every description passing to and fro, 
and the hills of Glastonbury, Portland, 
Marlborough, He- 
bron, Colchester, 
Westchester, East 
Haddam and Mid- 
dletown dotted with 
the habitations of 
men and the spires 
and towers of church- 
es. It is a panorama 
equalled by few loca- 
tions in this state. 
In a clear day Long 
Island Sound and the 
shores of Long Island 
are plainly vis ible . 1 1 
is a pleasant thought 
to bring to mind as 
one views this scene, 

that he can see the birthplaces of David 
Brainard, and of James Brainard Taylor ; 
of Rev. Edward Dorr Griffin, and his 
contemporaries, Rev. Dr. Emmons, and 
Eliphalet Nott, D. D. ; of Major General 
Joseph Spencer of Revolutionary fame, of 
Colonel Henry Champion of the old 
French War, afterwards a Commissary 
General of the eastern army during the 
Revolutionary War, of General Henry 
Champion, son of the preceding, of 
Stephen J. and Cyrus W. Field, the former 
a Justice of the U. S. Court, the latter a 
promoter in ocean telegraphy, and many 



others of the past who were renowned in 
civil and military life. 

This prospect alone is worth a visit to 
Great Hill. 

Eastward from Middle Haddam the 
ground rises in some places very boldly. 
Here is a hill of great natural beauty, 
and enchanting scenery known by the 
name of " Hog Hill." The reason of its 
bearing this unbecoming name, is as fol- 
lows : " Soon after the settlement of this 
society," says Roberts, " the hogs belong- 
ing to the early settlers were allowed to 
roam at large. On this hill the first 




'spring brook. 



RESIDENCE OF THE LATE DEMAS STRONG. 

meeting house was built, and standing on 
the side hill it was stoned up underneath, 
and a small aperture left for going under 
the church. During a storm the swine 
took refuge under the church. Some 
party closed the entrance and shut the 
swine in and they were not found until 
the Sabbath day when their noise dis- 
turbed the worshippers. From this cir- 
cumstance this beautiful hill has always 
been known as Hog Hill." 

Among the old and more prominent 
families, who were active in building and 
making Middle Haddam what it was in 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



379 




HON. DEMAS STRONG. HON. HORACE JOHNSON. CAPT. NATH'E C. JOHNSON. 



686545 




CAPT. MARVIN NORTON. DR. A. B. WORTHINGTON. HON. JOHN STEWART. 













M \ 




}?- J 




M 








**'-■ 




W£T ±* 


' 




w *.- _;m 


H8P^- -ml 




CAPT. EDWARD C. GARDNER. HON. CYRUS HURD. CAPT. EDWARD M. SIMPSON. 



38o 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



its early days, the names of Stewart, 
Johnson, Hurd, Carrier, Whitmore, Taylor, 
Clark, Childs, Simpson, Tibbals, Selden, 
Smith. Norton, Parker, Foote, Gardner, 
Griffith, Tallman , Strong, Shepard, Warner, 
Roberts, and Post have been known to all 
who know anything of the parish. One 
incident connected with the name of 
Johnson, is worthy of relating as showing 
the ambitions of the sons of these old 
families. It is related of Capt. Nathaniel 
Cooper Johnson, now deceased, that he 
went to work for his father in the shipyard 
at caulking, on the under side of a vessel 
that was on the stocks. After working 




RESIDENCE OF E. R. BRAINERD 



one day, he told his father that he had 
worked as long as he wanted to on the 
under side of a vessel, and that hereafter 
he would get his living on deck. Proving 
his word, he very soon became sailing 
master, and for many years of his life he 
trod the quarter-deck of some of the finest 
" London packets" as captain. Among 
others he commanded "The Sovereign 
of the Seas." He retired early in life, 
having accumulated a fortune. 

Chatham has ever been noted for the 
loyalty and patriotism of its citizens. Its 
citizen-soidiers have been in every war 



from the first French and Indian War to 
the present. So early as Dec. 19, 1774, 
the citizens assembled in town meeting, 
passed the following resolve to wit : "That 
this town do accept and approve of the 
doings of the Congress, held at Philadel- 
phia in September last, and agree to keep 
and observe the same and to do our utter- 
most that the same shall be punctually 
kept and observed according to the true 
intent of the Congress." A committee of 
observation was appointed to see to it 
that citizens lived up to the requirements 
of the resolution. When soldiers from 
Chatham went to duty they were armed 
and provisioned ac- 
cording to approved 
methods of the times 
of their going. In 
the town treasurer's 
book, on the date of 
June 18, 1780, we 
find the following 
record. '• State of 
Connecticut to the 
town of Chatham Dr. 
to supplying Captain 
Brainard's company 
with provisions and 
stores to march to 
West Point in 
alarm by order 
General Ward, for twenty days. 

£ 

" To 8co lbs. of bread, 9 
To one bbl. pork, 6 
To one beef kine, 3 
To 10 gals, rum, 4 
To man and team, to carry bag- 
gage, and stores for the 
Company, 3 
To expense of team, 2 



s. 

12 
o 
6 

10 



an 
of 

d. 
o 
o 
o 
o 



29 8 o" 

In the Civil War, 1861-5 were many 

from this town, now gray grown with age 



THE TOWN OF CHATHAM. 



38i 



and wearing the G. A. R. badge, who 
were then sprightly young soldiers. And 
many are the homes where brave loved 
ones lived who went, and did not return, 
giving their lives for liberty and the 
freedom of this fair land. 



Middle Haddam, with its ease of access 
to and from the large centers of popula- 
tion by river or rail, make it an ideal 
place of residence, and especially so in 
the summer season. There is no place 
more worthy of receiving its share of the 




With a record to be proud of, with 
natural beauty that will compare favorably 
with any portion of New England, the 
town of Chatham has within its bounds an 
abundance of interest. And that part of 
the town by the Great River, known as 



city folk on the lookout for rest and 
recreation, and who shall say that the 
prospect of no distant future is a town 
resembling in the amount of its life and 
activity the Middle Haddam of former 
days. 




27 



LIST OF BURIALS, CENTER CHURCH BURYING 
GROUND, HARTFORD. 



ANNOTATED BY MARY K. TALCOTT. 



1794. 

Sept. 2 James Grimes, Burial charged 
Geo. Knox, aged 17 years. 
4 Child of William Wells, aged 3 

years. 
" Infant Child of William Wells. 
9 Infant Child of Jonathan Chap- 
man. 
1 1 Infant Child of Samuel Waterous. 
19 Wife of Jacob Cadwell [Susan- 
nah], aged 26 years. 
" Child of Simeon Rice, aged 6 mo. 
25 Infant Child of Jeremiah Barret. 

27 James Church [son of Capt. 

James and Abigail (Stanley) 
Church], aged 58 years. 

" Moses Marsh, aged 24 years. 

" Child of James Knox, aged 1 
year. 

28 A Stranger Interred at Expense 

of Town, aged 23 years. 
Oct. 1 Child of Elijah Clapp, aged 6 mo. 
" Leverett Hubbard, N. Haven 
[born July 21, 1725, in Killing- 
worth. Son of Col. John and 
Elizabeth (Stevens) Hubbard], 
aged 74 years. 

3 Child of Roderick Bunce 

[Rachel], aged 18 mo. 

4 Child of Jacob Cadwell [Iyaura], 

aged 1 month. 
" Jesse Butler, aged 35 years. 

8 Daughter of John Roberts, aged 
10 years. 

11 Child of Samuel Wheeler [Sam- 
uel], aged 18 months. 

13 Child of John Roberts, aged 2 
years. 

19 Child of Simeon Judd, aged 1 
year. 

22 Mrs. Mary Ann Walker [daugh- 
ter, (Marion) of Robert & Mary 
(Smith) Nevins, bapt. Oct. 
17, 1754], aged 40 years. 
382 



22 Child of Adonijah Brainard, aged 
3 years. 

28 Child of Bela Burt. 

29 Wife of William Wells, aged 29 

years. 
31 Jonathan Wells [son of Jonathan 

and Ruth (Bull) Welles, bapt. 

March 20, 1719], aged 75 years. 
Nov. 9 Daughter of Daniel Olcott, aged 

15 years. 
10 Elijah Yeomans, aged 45 years. 
12 Benjamin Webber, aged 26 years. 
12 The Wife of Nathaniel White 

[Sarah, daughter of Timothy 

and Sarah (Seymour) Steele], 

aged 28 years. 
12 Child of John Cable [Betsey], 

aged 6 months. 

17 Child of Freeman Kilbourn, aged 

18 months. 
21 Samuel Turner, aged 48 years. 
Dec. 1 Child of Asa Francis [Henry], 
aged 1 year. 
2 The Mother of Rev. Abel Flint 
[Jemima Jennings, widow of 
James Flint of Windham, and 
daughter of Ebenezer Jennings, 
born April 18, 1732], aged 63 
years. 

7 Barnibas Dean [son of Silas and 

Sarah (Barker) Dean, born in 
Groton, Conn. ], aged 52 years. 

8 2 Infant children of William 

Lord. 

18 Joseph Wheeler, aged 35 years. 
27 Infant child of Asa Corning. 

1795. 

Jan. 1 Child of Widow Hannah Burns 
[Patty, daughter of James 
Burns], aged 7 years. 

9 Frederick Stanley [son of Augus- 

tus and Alice (Seymour) Stan- 
ley, bapt. Jan. 20, 1754], aged 
43 years. 



BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 383 



11 



15 



18 
20 

25 

Feb. 4 
20 



Mar. 6 
Apr. 1 



11 
16 

23 



May 3 

25 

June 11 

22 

26 



8 

July 14 

18 

19 
Aug. 1 

7 
9 



Child of David Greenleaf , aged 2 9 

years. 
Asher Goodwin [son of Ozias 14 

and Mary (Steele) Goodwin, 

born May 15, 1768], aged 26 19 

years. 
Child of David Greenleaf, aged 3 

years. 
Infant Child of Timothy Burr. 23 

Deacon Ebenezer Crosby, aged 

86 years. 26 

Infant Child of Elias Morgan. 
Infant Child of Theodore Dwight* 27 

The wife of Moses Smith [Mabel, 

daughter of Capt. Daniel and 29 

Lydia (King) Seymour, born 

April 21, 1757], aged 44 years. Sept. 5 
Child of Benjamin Wood, aged 4 

years. 5 

Wife of Jonathan Bigelow 

[Louisa], aged 37 years. 9 

Child of Abigail, an Indian 

woman, aged 3 years. 9 

The wife of James Lamb, aged 56 

years. 9 

Son of Mary Larkum [James 

Goodwin], aged 12 years. 10 

Pennwell (Pownal) Deming[son 

of Rev. David and Mehitabel 10 

(Champion) Deming, born 

Sept. 30, 1749], aged 45 years. 11 

Infant Child of Richard Bunce. 
Infant Child of Alfred Janes [or 12 

Jones]. 
The wife of Elias Morgan [Sally, 15 

daughter of David Bull], aged 

29 years. 16 

Child of John Jackson, aged 8 

months. 18 

John Watson, aged 65 years. 
Infant Child of Benjamin Wood. 20 

Infant Child of Ephraim Root. 
William Adams, Esq., [son of 

William and Freelovef Arnold) 

Adams, born in Milford, Conn., 

Aug. 18, 1742], aged 51 years. 20 

Infant Child of Ashbel Wells. 
George Lee, aged 35 years. 21 

Infant child of Thomas Mason. 
Jacob Conklin, aged 49 years. 
Child of John Leffingwell, aged 

4 years. 
Infant child of Benoni Case. 
Eleasur Cushman, aged 27 years. 



Child of Tabor Bolles, aged 3 
months. 

Child of James H. Wells, aged 5 
years. 

Child of Jonathan [and Mary 
(Chad wick)] Ramsay [Lydia, 
born April 30, 1794], aged 18 
months. 

Son of P. Greenwood [Parsons], 
aged 14 years. 

Son of Jonathan Flagg [John], 
aged 15 years. 

Child of John Caldwell [James 
Church], aged 1 year. 

Child of William Wear, aged 8 
months. 

The Mother of Richard Butler 
[widow Mary], aged 67 years. 

Child of George Goodwin [Jere- 
miah], aged 9 months. 

Child of Hezekiah Wyllys [John 
Palsgrave], aged 4 years. 

Child of John Cable [George], 
aged 18 months. 

Child of Amos Bull, aged 4 
months. 

Child of Roswell Stanley [Har- 
riet], aged 9 months. 

Sister of Caleb Tuttle, aged 33 
years. 

Mrs. Arnold, Burial charged Sel- 
den Chapman, aged 18 years. 

Child of John Caldwell [Hep- 
zibah], aged 5 years. 

Son of James Wadsworth, aged 
15 years. 

Child of George Goodwin [Jason, 
born Jan. 22,1789], aged 7 years. 

Child of Nathaniel Skinner, aged 
2 years. 

Mrs. Edwards, burial charged 
Geo. Goodwin [Mary, dau. of 
Jonathan Butler and widow of 
Richard Edwards], aged 77 
years. 

Child of Thomas Haynes, aged 2 
years. 

Thomas Hildrup [a w T atch re- 
pairer from London, settled 
here in 1772 ; one of the 
founders of Christ Church ; 
postmaster, 1777-94 (Hoadly's 
Annals of Christ Church, 
1879)], aged 55 years. 



384 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



the 



44 



22 Son of Joseph Looinis, aged 21 
years. 

27 The wife of Andrew Chapman, 

aged 40 years. 

28 The wife of Klisha Bigelow 

[Hannah, dau. of Capt. Cyprian 
and Mary (Spencer) Nichols, 
bapt. May 8, 1720], aged 75 
years. 

29 Bnos Lias, burial charged 

Town, aged 39 years. 
Oct. 4 Jerusha Wadsworth, aged 
years. 
4 Child of Charles Cumbough, 
aged 1 year. 

Child of Simon Clark, aged 18 mo. 

Child of Robert Seymour 
[James], aged 2 years. 

The Rev. Calvin Whiting [son 
of Jonathan Whiting of Need- 
ham, Mass., born March 4, 
I 77 I > graduated at Harvard 
College in 1791 ; candidate for 
the ministry], aged 24 years. 

Mrs. Baston, aged 77 years. 

The Wife of Allen McLean [Mary 
Sloan of New Haven], aged 49 
years. 

Child of William Andrus, Jr. 
[Hervey]. 
Nov. 1 Child of William Hosmer 
[Maria], aged 5 years. 
4 Child of John Babcock, aged 6 
months. 

4 Infant Child of William Lord. 

5 Child of Vine Ames, aged 2 years. 

6 The wife of Moses Hopkins 

[Mary, born Dec. 4, 1735 ; dau. 
of Bevil and Lydia (Dodd) 
Seymour of Newington.] 

7 Sylvanus Andrus, aged 71 years. 
14 Abigail Whitman [widow of 

Rev. Blnathan Whitman ; dau. 
of Col. Nathaniel and Anna 
(Whiting) Stanley, born July 
24, 1719], aged 76 years. 

Simeon Judd [son of Simeon and 
Blizabeth (Norton) Judd; born 
July 9, 1748, in Farmington], 
aged 47 years. 

Aaron Seymour [son of Zebulon 
and Keziah (Bull) Seymour, 
born March 11, 1744], aged 54 
years. 



22 

28 



28 



t8 



28 



28 Gideon Carter, aged 44 years. 

30 Child of William Pratt, Jr., aged 
1 year. 
Dec. 1 Child of Jeremiah Barret. [In- 
fant. ] 

23 Child of William Imlay, aged 1 
year. 

29 Nathaniel S. Benton [son of 

Bbenezer and Ruth (Seymour) 
Benton], aged 37 years. 

29 James Bull, aged 20 years. 

30 The wife of William Weare, aged 

37 years. 
1796. 

Jan. 4 Infant Child of Widow Olive 
Judd [and Simeon.] 
2 John Babcock. 
16 Bnos Blias, burial charged the 

Town, aged 6 years. 
26 Child of Thomas Wadsworth, 
aged 11 years. 

31 Infant Child of Robert Seymour. 
Feb. 6 John Spencer [son of John 

Spencer, bapt. July 24, 1715], 

aged 80 years. 
11 The wife of Hezekiah Cad well, 

aged 43 years. 
15 Infant Child of John Barbage 

(Burbidge.) 

23 Infant Child of David Phippeny. 

24 Bathshebah Marsh [widow of 

Lemuel Marsh and daughter 
of Jonathan and Rebecca (Wha- 
ples) Barrett, born 1718], aged 
78 years. 
March 1 Infant Child of Samuel Day, 2d. 
11 Mrs. Crocker, aged 46 years. 

25 John Haynes Lord [ Son of Blisha 

and Mary (Haynes) Lord, bapt. 
Dec. 17. 1724], aged 72 years. 

30 John Allen's Child. [Infant.] 
April 11 Child of Leonard Kenedy [Leon- 
ard], aged iy 2 years. 

14 Abigail Brown, ["Widow Nab- 
by"], aged 55 years. 

25 George Wyllys, Bsq. , [son of 
Hezekiah and Blizabeth (Ho- 
bart) Wyllys, born Oct. 6, 
1 7 10 ; Secretary of the colony 
and state of Connecticut, 
1734-96], aged 86 years. 

29 Theodore Skinner [ Son of Daniel 
and Abigail (Smith) Skinner, 
bapt. May 12, 1751], aged 45 
years. 



BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 385 



May 1 Daniel Skinner [Son of Deacon 
Joseph and Mary (Grant) 
Skinner of Windsor, born April 
x > I 7 3]> aged 84 years. 

3 Child of James Olcott, aged 1 

year. 
14 James Steele, aged 76 years. 
5 David Craig, aged 39 years. 

13 The wife of Capt. George Smith 

[George Smith and Anna Cook 
were married July 17, 1749], 
aged 69 years. 

19 Infant Child of Josiah Benton. 

21 Samuel Shortman, aged 36 years. 

23 Child of Joseph Day, aged 1 year. 
26 Child of Barzillia Hudson, aged 

3 years. 

26 The wife of Daniel Curtiss, aged 

49 years. 
June 2 Elizabeth Burn, aged 73 years. 

4 Infant Child of Theodorus Barnot. 

5 Thomas Henderson, aged 44 

years. 
. 17 Infant Child of John Hempsted. 

24 Elisha Bigelow [Son of Joseph 

and Sarah (Spencer) Bigelow, 
born June 27, 1723], aged 73 
years. 
July 4 Infant Child of Mr. Jordon. 

27 Child of Solomon Mars, aged 5 

years. 
Aug. 3 James Steele's Child [Lorenzo], 
aged 4 years. 
9 The wife of Nathan Wadsworth 
(Sally Welles), aged 37 years. 

10 Child of John Steele (William), 

aged 2 years. 

11 Child of William Hudson [Mar- 

garet Seymour], aged i}4. years. 

14 The wife of John Watson [ Sarah ] , 

aged 38 years. 
19 Mary Steele [widow], aged 94 

years. 
21 Child of Azariah Hancock, aged 

1 year. 
21 Child of Mrs. Wagner, aged 1 year. 
23 Betsey Wheeler [daughter of 
Sally], aged 11 years. 
Sept. 2 Son of R. Howell [Jabez], aged 
21 years. 
2 Child of James Steele [Lucy], 

aged 1 year. 
2 Child of Isaac Watson, aged 1 
year. 



4 Epaphras Seymour [son of Capt. 
Zebulon and Ann (Marsh) 
Seymour, born 1767], aged 29 
years. 

4 Child of Seth Sweetser, aged 9 

months. 

7 Infant Child of William L. Lloyd. 

8 Sally Judd. 

10 Child of Bille (Bela) Burt, aged 

8 months. 
20 Daughter of Joel Byington, aged 

25 years. 
25 A Sister of Samuel Wadsworth 

[Helena, daughter of Sergeant 

Jonathan andHepsibah( Marsh) 

Wadsworth, born June 2, 1724], 

aged 72 years. 
25 : - Infant Child of David Greenleaf. 
30 Samuel Drake, aged 29 years. 
Oct. 1 Pantry Jones [son of Nathaniel 

and Rebecca (Pantry) Jones, 

bapt. Sept. 9, 1716]. 
2 James Olcott [son of Capt. John 

and Sarah (Church) Olcott, 

born Aug. 5, 1759], aged 37 

years. 

5 Child of Samuel Bolles, aged 1 

year. 
15 Elisha Dodd [Son of Edward and 

Rebecca (Barnard) Dodd], 

aged 50 years. 
22 Margaret Nicoll, aged 67 years. 
30 Infant Child of Robert Seymour. 
Nov. 4 Child of Hamblin, aged 1 year. 

4 Mrs. Susannah Hildrith (Hill- 

drup). [Thomas Hilldrup and 
Susannah Hull of Wethersfield 
were married June 30, 1777, by 
Rev. Mr. Jarvis of Middletown. 
(Hoadly's Annals of Christ 
Church)], aged 44 years. 
Dec. 3 John Sheldon [Son of John and 
Elizabeth (Pratt) Sheldon], 
aged 77 years. 

5 Infant child of Raphael, French- 

man. 
22 Infant child of Joseph Burr. 
25 The Wife of Daniel Hopkins, 

aged 29. 
29 The wife of Joseph Burr [Mary, 

daughter of James Mookler], 

aged 36 years. 

( To be continued.) 



PRUDENCE CRANDALL. 



IN connection with Mr. Norton's article 
on " Negro Slavery in Connecticut " 
in the June number of this magazine, 
it is quite in keeping to give a short 
account of the action taken by the state 
to partially reimburse Piudence Crandall 
Philleo for the outrageous persecution and 
injuries done her which he has described. 
More than half a century later when she 
was old and indigent, the subject of 
granting her a pension by the State of 
Connecticut was agitated at the session of 
the General Assembly held in 1886 and 
was at first adversely reported by the 
appropriations committee, but the senti- 
ment of the people as expressed through 
the newspapers and elsewhere was so 
universally in her favor that the bill was 
recommitted and finally passed, granting 
her $400 a year, $100 to be paid each 
quarter commencing April 1, 1886, as 
long as she should live. Prominent 
among the workers for this measure was 
Stephen A. Hubbard of the Hartford 
Courant and he ceaselessly advocated the 
granting of an annuity, to amend in some 
measure, for the infamous blot upon the 
State's history and the injustice done her. 
From the speech of Senator John W. 
Marvin of Saybrook, before the Senate 
upon the presentation of the bill for action, 
the following is worthy of quotation : 

" As the death of the martyrs was the 
seed of the church, so truly was this 
oppression the seed of that anti-slavery 
movement that culminated in our recent 
Civil War and in the declaration of the 
memorable Lincoln, freeing millions of 
human beings from bondage that no other 
way had ever been devised to be accom- 
386 



plished. Is it not clear, senators, from this 
brief narrative that this state is morally lia- 
ble for this great wrong, and that while we 
boast of our religious privileges and our 
great educational advantages, our skilled 
devices and our noble ancestors, we should 
look with shame upon this great wrong 
still remaining unrequited ? Great men, 
a Washington, a Putnam, a Garfield, a 
Grant, die, and monuments are erected to 
their memories, but they are unconscious 
of it. Has not this thought occurred to 
you as to me? Oh ! that he could have 
known in his lifetime how great was the 
admiration of the people for him ! Oh ! 
that he could have known then that a 
grateful people would erect to his memory 
an enduring tribute ! 

" Our heroine still lives and can know 
and appreciate our acts in her behalf, and 
if this general assembly shall even in part 
right this great wrong she will go down to 
her grave, not only in peace, but with 
gratitude for her native state. 

" See her in her little box house of 
three rooms on the hillside in the west, 
eking out a scanty subsistence from a 
second-bottom farm, still in debt for the 
material for enclosing it ; and then recall 
the heroic struggle for usefulness in her 
early days so completely frustrated — the 
result of the legislation of her native state 
— and tell me if her wrongs should not be 
redressed, and the hard Jot now experi- 
enced by her should not be exchanged for 
one of comparative ease and comfort. It 
were an honor for any state to contribute 
for the support of a woman of such a 
history, but for us to do it is an act of 
right and justice. 



PRUDENCE C RAND ALL, 



387 



" Senators, have you a daughter or a 
sister flushed with youth and health, 
whose future is full of promise, whose 
delicacy and purity challenge the admira- 
tion of all who know her. Fancy her in 
the sheriff's custody at the instigation of a 
ruthless mob, and for conscience sake is 
cast into an assassin's cell, her couch a 
murderer's couch, and then say. if such an 
act should not be atoned for. 

" Is it said that there is no law for this 
appropriation ? If there were law the case 
would not be here. Causes that are tried 
by the General Assembly come to this as 
a higher power. The General Assembly 
make laws and find and dispense equities 
in such cases. 

" Is it said that there is no precedent 
for it ? We are a precedent unto ourselves, 
and the precedent that we will make to 
succeeding general assemblies shall be to 
do right ; and let this our precedent last 
and be perpetuated for all coming time." 

In September, 1886, Mr. George B. 
Thayer, on his return trip from across the 
continent on a bicycle, called on Mrs. 
Philleo at her home at Elk Falls, Kansas, 
and from the interesting account he has 
given in his book " Pedal and Path " we 
quote the following portion : 

'•Just then Mrs. Philleo carafe in and 
said cordially, ' I am glad to see anyone 
from good old Connecticut.' As she 
removed her bonnet, it showed a good 
growth of sandy gray hair, smoothed back 
with a common round comb, and cut 
straight around, the ends curling around 
in under and in front of her ears ; of me- 
dium height, but somewhat bent and spare, 
and with blue eyes, and a face very 
wrinkled, and rather long ; her chin quite 
prominent, and a solitary tooth on her 
upper jaw, the only one seen in her 
mouth. 

" She smiled with her eyes, and with a 
pleasant voice, said : 'Come, you must be 



hungry, coming so far,' and she urged the 
apple pie, ginger snaps, johnny-cakes, 
potatoes, ham, bread and butter, and tea, 
upon me promiscuously, and in great pro- 
fusion. 

" 'Now come into the other room, I want 
to show you some pictures.' 

"So, talking every minute, we went into 
the sitting-room, and drawing up rocking- 
chairs, we sat down cosily together. ' I 
am going to have these photographs of 
these noble men all put into a frame 
together. I don't want them in an album, 
for I have to turn and turn the leaves so 
much. I want them in a frame, so I can 
get the inspiration from them at a glance. 
This is Samuel Coit, who did so much last 
winter in my behalf, and this is S. A. Hub- 
bard of the Cotirant. This is . 

Why I see that you know all of these 
noble souls. Well, I want to read you a 
letter he sent me,' and she slowly picked 
out the words of the writer who said, 
among other generous things, that he 
would be only too glad to load her down 
with any number of his books, and would 
send her a complete file of them. The 
letter was signed Samuel L. Clemens. 

" ' And here is Major Kinney, and 
George G. Sumner, and Rev. Mr. Twichell. 
What grand good men they are. And this 

you say you have heard him preach I 

How much I would give to hear that 
great scul speak,' and she handed me 
Rev. Mr. Kimball's photograph and several 
others, every one of which is more pre- 
cious to her than gold. In this collection 
also were photographs of William Lloyd 
Garrison, Wendell Phillips, and other anti- 
slavery friends of hers, and I noticed 
several others of Garrison framed and 
hung about the house. When I expressed 
the opinion that the amount of her pen- 
sion was too small in proportion to the 



3*8 



TO THE CONNECTICUT RIVER. 



injury inflicted, she said : 'O, I am so 
thankful for that. It is so much better 
than nothing.' 



" I can only give a few sentences of 
hers. ' My whole life has been one of 
opposition. I never could find any one 
near me to agree with me. Even my 
husband opposed me, more than any one. 
He would not let me read the books that 
he himself read, but I did read them. I 
read all sides and searched for the truth 
whether it was in science, religion or 
humanity.' 

" The last thing that she said as I left 
her was, ' If the people of Connecticut 



only knew how happy I am, and how 
thankful I am to them, it would make 
them happy too.' " 

Her pension was regularly paid, every 
quarter by the Comptroller of the state 
through 1886, '87, '88 and '89, including 
the payment of January 1, 1890. 

She passed away at her home in Elk 
Falls, January 28, 1890, and the Comp- 
troller's report shows an item of $31.00 
paid to the estate of Prudence Crandall 
Philleo on February 10, 1891, to balance 
the claim. 

Although the amount was small, out of 
all proportion to the loss inflicted, it is a 
satisfaction to know that the people of 
Connecticut made restitution, in part at 
least, to Prudence Crandall. 



TO THE CONNECTICUT RIVER. 



BY ARTHUR FREMONT RIDER. 



Flow on ! oh noble river, grander far 
To me, than is the reed-engirdled Nile, 

For me, from mountain source to ocean bar, 
Thou ever had'st a laughing sunlit smile. 

Now can I think, indeed, and think of thee ; 
Thy rocky passes, or thy valley broad ; 

And brimming onward to the silent sea, 
Thou hast indeed instructed me of God. 

How many lessons have thy waters taught? 
As calmly, peacefully, they flowed along. 

What unknown wonders have thy waters wrought? 
For us, who know thee only by thy song. 
And as I think of thee my earliest friend 
My thoughts unhampered, reverently ascend. 



(SENIUM,©© 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 

to Joseph Carter Post, m. 2nd. Alanson 
son of Elishaand Sarah (Lewis) Wright. 

4. Philena, b. Sept, 14, 1800, Killing- 
worth, Conn., m. 1st. Richard Clark, 
m. 2nd. Horace Clark, Apr. 18, 1833. 

5. John, d. aet. 20. 6. Cynthia, m. 
Ellsworth son of Elisha and Polly 
Bassett. 7. Lois, m. Phineas Bradley. 
8. Elmira, d. young. It is said that 
Chloe Clark had a relative named 
Selah Wilcox. 

QUERIES. 

59. Holmes. — Shubael, said to have been 
born in or near Schenectady, N. Y., m. 
Deborah dau. of David Small of Fal- 
mouth, Mass., and had : 1. James 2 , m. 
and had : James 3 of Taunton. 2. 
Lorine 2 , m. Mr. Sawyer. 3. Susan 2 , 
(half-sister) m. Capt. Perry of Prov., 

R. I. 4. 2 , (half-sister) m. 

Mr. Spooner of Prov. 5. Hiram 2 , b. 
Sept. 8, 181 7, Prov. m., 1st, Elizabeth, 



ANSWERS. 

25. (e) Daniel? Rutty, b. Aug 5, 1730, 
m. Jan. (23?), 1753, Mary Hodgkin, 
and had : 1. James, b. Feb. 22, 1754, 
d. Nov. 3, 1776 in his 23rd. year; he 
perhaps m. Jerusha Bebe whose death, 
Dec. 19, 1776, in her 27th. year is next 
to his. 2. Daniel, b. Mch. 10, 1756, 
d. July 1, 1760 called " the 2nd." 3. 
Mary, b. June 12, 1758. 4. Elizabeth, 
b. Apr. 5, 1760. 5. Daniel, b. Aug. 1, 
1762, d. July 11, 1779, in his 17th year, 
he is called " 3d." There is also death 
of Asa Rutty, Dec. 3, 1760, in his 17th 
year, and (torn) Rutty, May 1, 1763, 
in 47th year. Abel Clark m. Sept. 20, 
ftkA 1869 Mary Rutty. These dates are 
from Chloe Clark's Bible in possession 
of Mrs. J. C. Post, Ivoryton, Conn. 
Abel Clark's father and grand-father 
were both named Thomas. Able Clark 
(d. Mch. 11, 1805, in 81st year), and 
Mary (d. Dec. 24, 181 7 in 87th year), 
had: I. Mary, b. Oct. 30, 1770 
perhaps m. 1789 Abner Graves. II. 
Miriam bp. Dec. 30, 1772, m. Nathan 
Howell from Long Island and had : 1 . 
Philena, d. aet. 1. 2. Polly d. aet. 22. 
3. Unice, m. ist. Joseph Clark, uncle 
389 



dau. of Peter L. and Betsey (Chapman) 
Avery and : 1. Elizabeth 3 , m. David 
Newcomb. Hiram 2 , m. 2nd, Nancy 
Avery, sister of Elizabeth, and had : 2. 
Susan 3 . 3. Hiram Clifford 3 , m. Mary 
Elizabeth Dyer. 4. Hattie Freeman 
Lewis 3 , m. Fred. Lee. Who were 



390 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



parents of Shubael? Did he have any 
brothers and sisters? H. C. H. 

60. Brewster. — Wanted for the geneal- 
ogy of the descendants of ElderWilliam 
Brewster, of the " Mayflower," now 
being compiled by Miss Emma C.Brew- 
ster Jones, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, the names and addresses of des- 
cendants of Benjamin Brewster, who d. 
abt. 1755 (his will dated Jan. 14, 1755), 
at Lebanon, Conn. His children were : 
1. Benjamin, b. Sept. 24, 1697, m - 
Rebecca Blackman. 2. John, b. May 
25, 1 701, m. Mary Terry. 3. Mary 
b. April 22, 1704, m. Benjamin Payne 
4. Jonathan, b. Nov. 14, 1 706, d. Oct 
24,1717. 5. Nehemiah, b. June 25 
1709, d. April 23, 1 7 19. 6. Comfort 
b. Dec. 2, 171 1, m. Deborah Smith. 7 
Daniel, b. Nov. 21, 17 14, m. Mary 
Dimock. — Upon application circulars 
giving full information will be furnished 
to those who are interested in the Brew- 
ster genealogy. 

61. Fox. — Daniel of East Haddam, 
Conn., b. abt. 1722, m. 1st, Hannah 
Burr ; m. 2nd, Elizabeth Gates. Who 
were his parents ? W. F. F. 

62. (a) Greene. — Philip, b. Sept. 9, 
1737: Rachel, b. Feb. 11, 1739, m. 
May 8, 1759, Louis de la Vergne : 
Augustus, b. Feb. 3, 1740: Phebe, b. 
Oct. 25, 1742 : Timothy, b. April 9, 
1744: Ambrose, b. April 9, 1746: 
Naomi, b. Feb. 22, 1748 : Ruth, b. Jan. 
22, 1752. Who were parents of these 
children? The family is said to have 
gone from Rhode Island to Long Island, 
and from there to Nine Partners, 
Duchess Co., N. Y. From there some 
of them went to Saratoga, Albany and 
Green Counties. 

(3) Warner. — Francis, m. 1737, 
Nicolas de la Vergne, a French surgeon. 
Their children lived at Nine Partners, 
N. Y. Who were her parents ? 

A. C. G. 



63. Pinkney. — Jane, dau. of Philip of 
East Chester, m. abt. 1700, Moses 
Dimon, of Fairfield, Conn. Who were 
ancestors of this Philip ? E. R. D. 

64. Shay/or. — Sarah b. Sept. 19, 17 19, d. 
Jan. 7, 1822, at Sheffield, Mass.; m. 
Dea. Ebenezer Smith, a first settler of 
Sheffield. Who were her parents? 

R. H. C. 

65. (a) Holmes. — Tryon A, d. Nov. 15, 
1873, aged 65, in Portchester, N. Y., 
lived in New Rocbelle, Westchester Co., 
N. Y., rn. Carlisle dau. of Joseph W. and 

Francis Electa ( ) Whitmoreand 

had 1. Electa E., m. Augustus Rich. 
2. Cornelius Secord. 3. Maria C. 
4. Henry Albro m. Rhoda dau. of 
Mervin Newton and Electa Elizabeth 
(Underhill) Whitney. 5. Jane Augusta 
m. John W. Henniger. 6. Joseph 
Whitmore m. Hattie Lucy E. dau. of 
Thomas Edward and Delila (Ames) 
Whitney. 7. Cornelius Secord m. 
Matha Booth : Tryon had a sister 
Maria A., who m. Cornelius Secord of 
New Rochelle. Who were parents of 
Tryon ? It is said his father was a sea 
captain from Bedford, N. Y., whose wife 
is said to have been a Miss Jones, who 
ran away from her home in England. 

H. A. H. 
(b) Holmes, Nathaniel from Rhode 

Island to Colchester, Conn., m. 

Stranahan and had Curtis who m. 



and had Curtis. Who were parents of 
Nathaniel? C. H. 

(e) Holmes, Daniel of Rocky Hill, 
Conn. — his father said to be Scotch — 

m. and had 1. Allen, b. May 27, 

1789, d. June 7, 1841, m. abt. 1802, 
Martha, b. Sept. 30, 1786 dau. of Giles 
Wright of Rocky Hill. 2. Lemuel, m. 

and had 1. Eliezer. 2. Cynthia. 

Who were parents of Daniel? E. H. 
66. Bordman. — Gamaliel, son of Lieut. 
Richard and Sarah (Camp) Bordman, 
was born in Newington Parish, Oct. 2, 



GENE A L GICA L DEPA R TMENT. 



39i 



171 1, m. Sarah Sherman, who was born 
about 1 7 16. He died in Newington, 
Sept. 17. 1754. His widow. Sarah, 
married Aug. 31, 1759. Sam'l Wolcott, 
and died March 6. 1794, aged 78. In- 
formation wanted as to ancestry of 
Sarah Sherman, and date of her first 
marriage. J. B. 

67. (a) Clark. — Ebenezer, b. Nov. 29, 
1651 (son of James of New Haven), m. 
2nd Elizabeth, widow of Isaac Royce 
whod. 16S2. Who was she? 
(&) Horton. — Abigail, m. as 2nd wife 
Feb. 6. 1759, Daniel Clark, b. Walling- 
ford, Feb., 1712. Who was she? 
(c) Howe. — Sarah, m. Mansfield, Nov. 
1763. Joseph Whittemore, b. there July 
4, 1736. Who was she? 
(a 7 ) Loomis. — Daniel, b. Nov. 2, 17 10 
(son of Daniel, John, Joseph) d. Union. 
Jan. 1. 1758, m. (by Stiles' Hist. Windsor, 
Sarah Enos dau. Jas., Jas., Jas.. Jas. Did 
he not marry Sarah dau. Jas., Jas., Jas. ? 

(e) Slate. — Ann, m. Joseph Whitte- 
more, b. perhaps 1694, d. Mansfield, 
May 15. 1742. Who was she? 

(/) Wales. — Timothy, (son of Dea. 
Nath'l, the Emigrant) , of Milton, Mass., 
d. aged 80. Whom did he marry ? 
(§-) Wales. — Ebenezer (son of Nath'l, 
Timothy, Deacon Nath'l), b. June 10, 
1696, d. Apr. 12, 1774, m. 1st ; Oct. 20, 
1 7 19, Esther Smith, who d. Oct. 10, 
1737. Who was she? 
(k) Bailey. — John, who settled in 
Haddam, in 1662. m. whom? His son 
John b. probably abt. 1663. m. whom? 

(f) Barnard. — Bartholomew, d. Hart- 
ford, 1697-8, m, Oct. 1647, Sarah 
Birchwood. Who was he? 

(j) Bowers. — Jerathmeel (son of 
George) b. Cambridge, Mass., May 2, 
1650, d. Groton, Mass., April 23, 1724, 
m. perhaps 1670 Elizabeth, b. abt. 
1645, d. Mch. 4, 1 721. Who was she? 
(k) BuffolpA.—Darid ( son of Lt. 
Tohn of Boston and Wethersfield) b. 



May 7, 1669, d. Simsbury, Apr. 5, 1 7 1 7 
m. perhaps 1693, Mary, and lived in 
Simsbury. Who was she? 
(/) Clark. — Joseph, b. 1695-6, d. 
Middletown, June 8, 1765, m. there 
May 28. 1724, Miriam Corn well. b. 
there Sept. 27, 1702, d. there May 27, 
1772. Who was he? 
(m) Fitch. — Mary, d. 1693, m. Thos. 
Sherwood, b. Eng. say 15 86, d. Fair- 
field, Oct. 1655. Who was she? 
(n) Harrison. — Arney, d. Middle- 
town. May 26. 1759 m - there as 2nd 
wife, Oct. 13, 1742, Nath'l Bacon, b. 
there Feb. 16.1706, d. 1792. Who 
was she? 

(0) Hilton. — Mary, b. perhaps 1673, 
m. in Middletown, Mch. 23, 1698-9 
John Cornwell b. there Aug. 13, 167 1. 
Who was she? 

(/) Hopkins. — Mary, m. 1644, Capt- 
Wm. Lewis, b. England, d. 1690. Who 
was she ? 

(q) Kelsey. — Lt. John, (son of Wm. 
of Hartford), m. say 1667, Phebe. b. 
Dec. 20, 1646, dau. of Nicholas Des- 
borough. Killingworth records have 
wife, Hannah died. How was this? 
(r) Phillips — Mary, d. Oct. 21, 1736. 
in Middletown, m. Feb. 10, 1702-3. 
John Hubbard b. there July 30. 1678, 
d. there Jan. 2, 1726-7. Who was she? 
(s) Steele. — James, b. England abt- 
1623, d. 1712. Steele book says she m. 
Oct. 18, 165 1. Anne, died 1676, dau. 
John Bishop of Guilford. Guilford his- 
tory says she m. John Jordan abt. 1640. 
Who was Steele's wife ? 
(/) Watson. — John (son of John), b. 
1646, d. W. Hartford, 1730, m. Anna 
and Sarah. Who were they? 
(//) Porter. — Mary, d. Middletown. 
June to, 1707. m. Middletown, Dec. 29, 
1670. Joseph Hubbard, b. Hartford, 
Dec. 10, 1643 . : d. Middletown, Dec. 26, 
1686. Who was she? 

W. P. Bacon, New Britain. Conn. 




FROM THE SOCIETIES. 



The Daughters of the American Re- 
volution have been much in evidence of 
late. The sixth annual conference of the 
Connecticut Society was held with the 
Stamford Chapter on May 22. Each of 
the forty-one chapters was represented, 
about 400 members being present, in- 
cluding two "real daughters," Miss Nancy 
Warren of the Stamford Chapter and Miss 
Lucy M. Osborn of the Danbury Chapter. 
Mrs. Sara T. Kinney of New Haven, the 
State Regent, presided, and the Presi- 
dent-General Mrs. Daniel Manning and 
regents from several other states were 
present. The sessions were mostly taken 
up with the reading of historical papers. 
The Katherine Gaylord Chapter of Bris- 
tol has recently forwarded to our soldiers 
at Manila a large box of reading matter, 
which is sure to be appreciated in that 
far away land. On June 8 the Ruth Wyllys 
Chapter of Hartford held a largely at- 
tended reception at the Athenaeum, for 
the purpose of meeting those who had 
aided the Chapter in its effort to improve 
the old Center Church burying ground. 
The seventeenth of the same month wit- 
nessed the consummation of the work in 
the formal delivery of the deeds, which, 
with the widening of Gold Street, brings 



the old cemetery once more to the light 
of day. With the erection of the con- 
templated iron fence and completion of 
the restoration of the crumbling monu- 
ments, the Chapter will have accomplished 
the most important work ever undertaken 
by any chapter of the D. A. R. 



The annual meeting of the Connecticut 
Society Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion was held at Hartford on May 10th. 
The former officers were re-elected, in- 
cluding Jonathan Trumbull of Norwich, 
president ; Charles G. Stone of Hartford, 
secretary ; and Hobart L. Hotchkiss of 
New Haven, registrar. The present mem- 
bership is 972. Essays to the number of 
200 were handed in as the result of the 
offering of prizes to the school children 
of the state. 



At the annual meeting of the Connec- 
ticut Society of Colonial Wars at New 
Haven on May 3rd, the old board of 
officers was re-elected, including James 
J. Goodwin of Hartford, governor ; George 
D. Seymour of New Haven, secretary j and 
Frank B. Gay of Hartford, registrar. 



392 




EDITORIAL NOTES. 



THE LEGISLATURE OF 1899. 

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY of Con- 
necticut closed the session of 1899 
last month after a considerable amount of 
hard and not unimportant work. Its 
committees deserve high praise for a large 
amount of conscientious and valuable 
labor ; a great deal of which was neither 
seen nor heard of by the public at large. 
Individually and collectively the members 
seemed actuated by the best of intentions, 
and with few exceptions, undoubtedly 
strove honestly to do their duty. It was 
on the whole as clean and disinterested a 
body as it is possible to get in these days. 
Improvements may come when the people 
are educated up to a fit appreciation of 
what government is really intended for? 
and when the Decalogue, or something 
like it, has a binding force among men 
once more. 

We have little sympathy with. the kind 
of criticism that condemns wholesale the 
work of our state legislatures, assumes 
that their members are all dishonest and 
generally guilty of seizing every oppor- 
tunity to plunder the public treasury. 
This kind of indiscriminate accusation and 
baseless imputation is as common as it is 
unjustifiable, and it is unfortunate that re- 
putable journals help to give it circulation 
by printing as news what they know very 
well is only irresponsible rumor. There is, 



however, a legitimate criticism which «is 
not only always in place but necessary. 

In his inaugural address the Governor 
said of the special commission appointed 
in 1897 to reduce state expenses, "If this 
committee has gone to the root of evils, 
it will report in favor of vigorous legisla- 
tion which will result in large retrench- 
ment. ... If you shall give to this 
report your careful consideration . . . 
you will save to the state for the next two 
years hundreds of thousands of dollars, 
and so be able to vote increased appro- 
priations for objects that are worthy and 
urgent." 

The recommendations of the commis- 
sion were independent and courageous, 
and, as the Governor anticipated, in the 
main reasonable. But they might as well 
never have been made so far as the 
Assembly was concerned for it took but 
scant notice of them. The financial ex- 
travagance was as unexpected as it was 
needless and unreasonable. Salaries were 
raised where there was not the slightest 
real need and appropriations were refused 
where the necessity for them was crying. 

The application of the Boston and New 
York Telephone Company for a charter 
was refused, perhaps rightly, but in this 
connection it is proper to say that the 
relations existing between the members of 
the General Assembly and the company 



393 



394 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



now enjoying a monopoly of the business 
in Connecticut give rise to unpleasant 
reflections. This company issued to 
every legislator a free pass book, franked 
his messages, and granted him practically 
an unlimited use of its wires gratis — a 
privilege few were slow to take advantage 
of. We think it is only reasonable to say 
that this does not commend itself to 
citizens who desire their representatives to 
be freehanded and uncompromised in all 
their actions. 

The bill that gave to a private company 
the sovereign right of eminent domain was 
engineered through the two houses by 
anything but creditable means. Gov. 
Lounsbury is entitled to the hearty thanks 
of the people whose rights he guarded 
and protected by promptly vetoing the 
charter granting such enormous privileges. 
The senate at last put itself on record as 
opposed to the payment of gratuities to 
newspapers or their reporters. This is a 
step in advance for which the whole state 
will be sincerely thankful, as the matter 
had become a standing disgrace to the 
fair name of Connecticut. But the dis- 



graceful scenes enacted in the closing 
hours of the session, when the halls o: 
legislation were turned into a cock pit, 
when the members engaged in rough and 
tumble fights similar to those usually oc- 
curring in low bar-rooms, when every mov- 
able article of furnishing and ornament 
that could be seized on was hurled back 
and forth by excited rowdies — this was a: 
passage in the history of the legislature of 
1899 which the voters of the state can 
only remember with the deepest shame. 
It is such incidents as these that are tele- 
graphed across the water, and is it any 
wonder that our many unkind and con- 
temptuous critics there use them as evi- 
dence of our uncouthness and the farcical 
nature in general of republican institutions ? 
The Roman Senate is only remembered 
by most people for its dignity. Can we 
not send even the tradition of legislative 
dignity down to our posterity ? We can if 
every self respecting man in Connecticut 
will take occasion to tell his representative 
exactly what he thinks of such ruffianly 
rowdyism. A change would soon follow 
if such a thing were done. 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



History of the Kimball, Kemball, Kym- 
bould Family in England and America is 
a work in 2 vols. 1,278 pp., by Leonard A. 
Morrison, Windham, N. H., and Prof. 
Stephen P. Sharpies, Cambridge, Mass ; 
price $6.00 per copy. This is the 
first general history of the Kimball family. 
The work treats of the descendants of 
Henry Kimball of Mistley, Eng. and 
Watertown, Mass. ; Richard Kimball of 
Rattlesden, Eng., Watertown and Ipswich, 
Mass. ; Amos Kimball of Vergennes, Vt. ; 
Phineas Kimball of West Fairlee, Vt. ; 



Kimballs of York Co., Me., Nathan K. of 
Salem, Ind. ; Caleb K. of Chester, N. H. ; 
Kimballs of Meredith, N. H. ; and of 
Boston, Mass. These finely illustrated, 
neatly bound volumes, represent an im- 
mense amount of labor. The Kimball 
Family News, 50c per year, is a monthly 
published in Topeka, Kansas by G. F. 
Kimball and contains additions and cor- 
rections to the family history. 

* 
John Mallett, the Huguenot, of Fair- 
field, Conn., and his descendants, is an 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



395 



octavo work of 362 pages by Miss Anna 
S. Mallett of 1,454 Rhode Island Ave., 
Washington, D. C, where the book can 
be obtained for $5.00 per copy. This 
splendid work contains the history of 
another Connecticut family, many of 
whose members went to the Southern 
States. The value of the book is greatly 
enhanced by the fine index of names. 

* * 
* 

The Hazard Family of Rhode Island, 
being a genealogy and history of the des- 
cendants of Thomas Hazard (1635), with 
sketches of the worthies of this family,and 
anecdotes illustrative of their traits and 
also of the times in which they lived, with 
portraits, coat of arms and map is an 
octavo work of 293 pp. $8.00 per copy. 
Compiled and for sale by Mrs. Caroline E. 
Robinson, Wakefield, R. I. There are 
many extracts from old wills and invento- 
ries. The biographical and historical 
character of the matter contained, gives 
an added interest to the dry genealogical 
statistics. Many of the descendants 
of this family settled in our state and 
have proved themselves worthy citizens. 

* * 

* 

The Morris Family of Philadelphia, 
founded by Anthony Morris, born Stepney, 
London, England, 1764, died at Philadel- 
phia 1 721, is an octavo work in 3 
volumes 1 260 pages, 300 illustrations, price 
$20.00. Compiled and for sale by Robert 
C. Moon, M. D., 13 19 Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia. The author has collected all 
the family traditions, records, and many 
illustrations of the family homes in town 
and country. We have here the history of a 
Quaker family, many of whose members 
passed into the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, under the guidance of Wm. White. 
The work is something more than a mere 
pedigree, for it tells us something of all 
the families and young and old may well 
be proud of the good record of those who 



for two centuries and more have helped 
to make it. 

* 
The Litchfield Book of Days. 
A Collation of the Historical, Bio- 
graphical and Literary Reminiscenses of 
the town of Litchfield, Connecticut. 
Edited by Rev. George C. Boswell. In 
his "House-Boat," Kendrick Bangs 
makes Dr. Johnson find fault with his Bos- 
well by saying that instead of doting on 
him, he anecdoted on him. Litchfield 
has been " Boswellized," and that right 
well, and while the editor has both doted 
and "anecdoted," the town can have 
nought but praise for his work. Of course 
he was favored in his subject ; a town 
without a peer in history and biography 
of more than local interest ; the town of 
the first law school in America from which 
went out over one hundred and twenty 
men who became famous as high officials 
iu our land ; the town of the Wolcotts 
and Beechers and Ethan Allen and Tap- 
ping Reeve and Judge Gould; a town 
where every old house has a history full of 
interest. But Rev. Mr. Boswell has made 
a collection of valuable historical and 
literary matter with a painstaking care for 
accuracy of detail that is a credit to all 
concerned. The interest with which one 
reads on and on in the book attests its 
merit. It contains more than forty illus- 
trations of present day Litchfield. Pub- 
lished by Alex. B. Shumway, Litchfield, 
Conn. Sent post paid for $1.60 Smith 
& McDonough, Hartford. 

# * 
* 

A Gentleman Player, by Robert 
Neilson Stephens — an historical novel, 
being " his adventures on a secret mission 
for Queen Elizabeth," interestingly told 
and kept in harmony with the spirit of the 
times it portrays. Four illustrations. 
Published by L. C. Page & Co., Boston, 
Mass. Price, $1.50. Smith & McDonongh, 
Hartford. 



39^ 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



The first number of the long expected 
quarterly magazine, The Mayflower 
Descendant, has appeared. If subsequent 
numbers can be made as interesting as 
this one its success should be assured. 
The first article is an account of the 
"Brewster Book" giving copies of the 
family records entered therein by a son 
and grandson of Elder William. Then 
comes an article on old style and new style 
dating. This is followed by a copy of the 
earliest Plymouth Colony wills ; and early 
Scituate vital records. The most interest- 
ing material for Connecticut readers is the 
diary of Jabez Fitch, Jr., of Norwich com- 
mencing in 1749. The diary and records 
are " to be continued " in later issues. 
Edited by George E. Bowman, Boston ; 
price, $2.00 per annum. 



* * 
* 



The Early Schools of Braintree by 
Samuel A. Bates. This is a well printed 
and indexed little pamphlet of 35 pages. 
Beginning with a vote passed in 1640, the 
year of the town's incorporation, it traces 
the history of the schools down to 1792, 
giving names of teachers and various items 
of interest. The salaries paid seem to-day 
very small. The first female teacher, 
1752, received $2.41 a month. (Smith & 
McDonough, Hartford, 25 cents.) 

* 
The Genealogy of the descendants of 
Samuel Boreman of Ipswich, Mass, 1638- 
164 1 and Wethersfield 1 641-16 73 and 
Thomas Boreman of Ipswick 1634-1673, 
from whom most of the Boardman's of 
America descend is a work of 778 pages. 



The records here gathered have been col- 
lected and are printed as the result of the 
deep interest felt in the subject by the 
publisher of the book. The contents are : 
Discovery of the Home in England, pp. 
1-32 ; Later Discoveries, pp. 33-43 ; Ban- 
bury and Claydon, pp. 44-59; The Old 
Home in the Civil War, pp. 60-65 > Origin 
of the Name, Changes in Spelling, Locali- 
ties where Found, Other Boreman Families 
in England, pp. 66-80 ; Pedigree of Bore- 
mans of Claydon near Banbury, England, 
including account of Thomas Boreman of 
Ipswich, Mass., and his descendants to 
the fifth generation, pp. 81-130; The 
Carter Family of Claydon, pp. 1 31-137 ; 
The Betts Family of Claydon and Hart- 
ford, Conn., pp. 138-149 ; Other Bore- 
mans and Boardmans in Early New 
England, pp. 153-157 ; Genealogy of the 
Family of Samuel Boreman of Wethers- 
field, Conn., pp. 158-668; Israel Bord- 
man of Newington and his Descendants, 
pp. 669-684 ; Other Unconnected 
Families, pp. 685-686 ; The Francis 
Family, pp. 687-692 ; The Goodrich 
Family, pp. 693-695 ; The Holtom or 
Holtum Family, pp. 696-699 ; Addenda, 
pp. 700-704 ; Lands of Samuel Boreman 
and mention of him in Town and Colonial 
Records, pp. 707-722 ; Letter of Nathan- 
iel Dickinson to Samuel Boreman, p. 725 ; 
There are a number of illustrations and 
fac-similies of autographs, and a thorough 
index to the whole work. Published by 
Wm. F. J. Boardman, 74 Farmington 
Avenue, Hartford, Conn. Price, $10.00 
per copy, or sent prepaid at $10.40. 






PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



The Connecticut Magazine will hereafter 
be published in the interest of a joint stock 
company as follows : 

Article III. The purposes for which said 
corporation is formed are the following, to 
wit : — 

To publish and sell "The Connecticut 
Magazine," and to do anything incidental 
thereto. To print, publish and sell any other 
magazines, periodicals, books or publications, 
to do any kind of printing and engraving, 
and to buy, sell and deal in any goods or 
articles necessary or convenient to be used 
in connection with the purposes before 
mentioned. 

Below is the list of stockholders. 

Geo. C. Atwell, New Britain, Edward B. 
Eaton, Hartford, Albert C. Bates, Hartford, 
James J. Goodwin, NewYork, Frank C. Sum- 
ner, Hartford, Atwood Collins, Hartford, J. G. 
Woodward, Hartford, Francis Goodwin, Hart- 
ford, John G. Root, Hartford, A. R. Hillyer, 
Hartford, Henry C. Robinson, Hartford, Geo. 
P. McLean, Simsbury, Francis R. Cooley, 
Hartford, P. H. Woodward, Hartford, Lewis 
E. Stanton, Hartford, Joseph H. King, Hart- 
ford, Henry S. Goslee, Glastonbury, Ernest 
B. Ellsworth, Hartford, William Newnham 
Carlton, Hartford, Dwight C. Kilbourn, Litch- 
field, B. M. Des Jardins, Hartford, William 
H. Richmond, Scranton, Pa., Chas. E. 
Thompson, Hartford, Franklin Clark, Hart- 
ford, Wm. F. J. Boardman, Hartford, Francis 
H. Richards, Hartford. 



Hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent 
annually in advertising. Many advertisers 
expect direct results — many results only in 
a general way. Some complain that adver- 
tising is uncertain, and yet the business house 
or manufacturer of a proprietary article who 
does not advertise falls behind in the race 
for business supremacy. 

The effectiveness of an advertisement is 
measured by its power to produce results. 



The publishers of the Connecticut Maga- 
zine frequently hear good reports from their 
advertisers. 

We quote a few letters which may be con- 
vincing. 

Springfield, Mass., July 5,' 1899. 
The; Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

Yours of the 3d inst. is at hand, and has 
our attention. You may insert the ad in the 
July number, as we are pleased to inform you 
that we have had very good returns from 
those you have already inserted. 
Yours very truly, 

B. STEBBINS MFG. CO. 
H. M. Brewster, Treas. 

[The ad was taken on trial for one inser- 
tion in May, and has been continued since. 
Glance at the ad inside back cover — Do you 
wonder it pays? It is attractive. All ads 
should be and can be if a little pains are 
taken.] 

Harteord, Conn. 
The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

I am very much pleased with the results 
from our advertisement in the magazine. We 
have received more benefit from this ad than 
from any other which we have carried in the 
daily papers and other periodicals. I wish 
the magazine success and believe the time is 
near at hand when your medium will be more 
appreciated by the advertising public, reach- 
ing as it does the best families in this state. 
Yours truly, 

W. J. MARTIN, 

Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Central New England Railway. 

Storrs, Conn. 
The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

* * * * w^ believe your advertisement is 
doing our College a great deal of good. 
Yours very truly, 

GEO. W. FLINT, Pres't, 
Storrs Agricultural College. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI. 

The Publishers can use short contributions 
of historical value, as applying to the State, 
for the Potpourri column; also various matters 
of humorous incident, facts about our public 
men, patriotic society notes and the like. 
Any contributions will have the Editor's 
attention and will find mention if available. 

HENRY B. PLANT was a great railroad 
builder and was born in Connecticut. 
So was Collis P. Huntington and so were a 
great many more of the builders of industrial 
America. — Harford Times. 



Meetings of two patriotic societies were 
held at the Hartford Club on the afternoon 
of June 28. The Society of Foreign Wars 
elected new members as follows : Arthur H. 
Day, Morris W. Seymour, Yandell Henderson, 
Lieutenant-Colonel George E. Cole. 

New members were elected by the Sons of 
the Revolution as follows : H. C. Curtis, 
F. S. Cadwell, Leonard A. Austin. 

— Hartford Con rant 



We thought as much. Admiral Dewey is 
a Vermonter but he comes from Connecticut 
stock. He is a descendant of William Dewey 
who was a corporal in Captain Worthywater's 
company, Hebron militia, in the war of the 
revolution and has been elected a member 
of the Sons of the Revolution. 



The Scribners have just brought out the 
little volume of newspaper stories which Jesse 
Lynch Williams has written. Many of these 
tales of newspaper life have appeared in the 
magazines, but the last story in the volume 
has never before been published. This story, 
"The Old Reporter," is the longest and 
most serious study of character development 
which the author has yet made, and is sure 
to win especial attention. 

Smith 6° McDonough, Hartford, Conn. 




ICE 
CREAM 



FRESH I 
CANDY 

FANCY t 



I 99) 



CAKES 

Telephone 
963. 

JACOBS, 

941 Main St., 
<i HARTFORD, 

( •'■ -'-.Jl CONN. 



The Leading Fire Insurance Co??ipany of America. 1 




WJML. B CLARK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E. O. WEEKS, Vice-President. 

A. C ADAMS, HENRY E. RRES, Assistant Secretaries. 



FIRE AND BURGLAR=PROOF 

SAFES 

ROBERT H. ASHMEAD 

HARTFORD, CONN. 




Harvey & Lewis, Opticians, 

865 Main St., Hartford, Conn. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. . . . 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued. 

The Beardsley Library, Winsted, was 
j Lpened to the public on July 5 as a free 
| library. Samuel N. Lincoln was the first 
f (subscriber under the new regime. It is in- 
teresting to note that Miss L. M. Carrington 
Completed twenty-five years to-day as libra- 
rian of the Beardsley Library though it was 
Itiot opened till September 15th, 1874, she 
'having been busy in the meantime catalogu- 
ing books, etc. The library contained at 
■that time 3,000 volumes. Another interest- 
ing fact is that the opening of the Memorial 
Library building occurred one year ago to- 
morrow. — Winsted Herald. 



The old district school house at East Had- 
dam, where Nathan Hale taught in 1774 and 
1775, is to be preserved as a perpetual 
monument to the martyr spy of the Revolu- 
tion. Richard Henry Greene of New York 
city, whose grandfather went to the school 
when Nathan Hale taught there, has moved 
the building to a site on the east bank of the 
Connecticut river, near East Haddam, just a 
short distance away from the original site. 
It now stands upon a hill, and is visible for 
miles around. 

The building will be dedicated as a perma- 
nent Nathan Hale Memorial, with appro- 
priate ceremonies, on the anniversary of 
Hale's execution, September 22nd. 



Our good Dea. C tells of an order written 
to Great Wm. P. years ago before this was a 
no license town, as follows : " Great Wm. P. 
I send to thee a 2 q't jug, and trimmings. 
Send at hand, or you'll be damned by order 
of Cast steel Ginnins." 

Here is a receipt showing how our good 
people did business in 1822. "Febaryi8 
1822 reseved too dollars of heman Whitcomb 
in fool of aul alounts against you now grant 
nortrup 

Jonh Chipman " 



.- *, 



:/■*% 




Cheap Printing! 

^^ ^B buys a handy little Portable Press for cards, 
Vl% labels, envelopes, etc $18 press for circu- 
^9 I^M lars or a small newspaper. Typesetting 
^r easy, printed instructions sent. A lad of ten 

can do good printing. A great money saver, or money 
maker either. A great convenience too. Send a 

STAMP FOR SAMPLES AND CATALOGUH, presses, type, 

paper, etc., direct to the factory. 

KELSEY <5c CO., 



62 COLONY ST., 



MERIDEN CONN. 




..<S" 



I 



Never 

Need 

Laundering, 

Hot Weather 
Wont Wilt 
Them. 

THE 



«J|S«* Windsor 

Collars and Cuffs. 

A little Sapolio or Soap 
will clean them without 
mjurn g the goods 



Trade Mark 

TheWindsor Soods. 

Water Proof 

COLLARS, CUFFS, SHIRT FRONTS AND NECKTIES. 

They look like linen but laundry bills are saved. The first 
cost is the only cost. New catalogue mailed free. Write for 
it. We make it interesting for live Agents. 

The Windsor Collar & Caff Co., 

Chicago, III. Windsor, Conn. 



PTease mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 










liliiiiSS^i^^l^i^::':^-^ 



FLEXIBLE HOOP. 
Canopy. 



I. E. PALMER, 



Middletown, Conn., U. S. A* 
New York Office, 62 White Street* 

Also Manufacturer of 



Canopies, Mosquito Nettings, Crinoline Dress Lining, Window 
Screen Cloth, School Bags, etc., etc. 

ON SALE AT ALL LARGE DRY GOODS AND HARDWARE STORES. 



PALMER'S HAMMOCKS. 




CUT n? iez 



Palmer's Patented ARAWANA 

"With Trapeze Suspension. 

The above Figure shows an Arawana 
slung from a Trapeze adjusted to its maxi- 
mum extension as regards its suspension 
from the ceiling. 

The Trapeze Suspension, as may be seen at a glance, 
is especially adapted to Veranda use, is adjustable to 
different sizes of Hammocks witbin its scope (from 6 ft. 
3 in. to 11 ft.) and to giving different degrees of dip and 
heights of suspension. Every conceivable swinging 
motion is obtained without effort. 



jahgS EM tf-roPJA^ 




Palmer's Patented UTOPIA 

With Hammock Support. 

The above Figure shows Hammock 
swung on Adjustable Support, the occu- 
pant in a comfortable reclining position as 
used on a Lawn. 

This support is adapted to Lawn, Veranda and indoor 
use and like the Trapeze Suspension, is adjustable to 
different sixes of Hammocks within its scope (from 6 ft. 
3 in. to 11 ft.) and to giving different degrees of dip and 
height from floor. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued. 

'■' Januar 28 A. D. 1795 Roceived of Amos 
Morthruy one pound lawful money which is 
n full of all Book acounts against Grant 
Northrup Received by me 

Stephen Burwell" 
"Reed of Thos. G. Northrop the 19th of 
Deer 1796 eight Dollars which is in full of 
all Book accounts I have against him from 
the Beginning of the world to this date 

Peter Comstock" 
'Mr Thomas G. Northrop Sir Pleas To 
Pay ths Barer LeGrand Booth sixe Dolars 
and ths shal Be your Recpt from me. Dated 
Huntington March 9th 1808 

William Booth" 
Kent Correspondence, Litchfield Enquirer. 



Pennsylvania dedicated a fine statue of 
Hartranft last week. Hartranft was a good 
soldier, but was he in the same class with our 
General Terry? Terry has no statue in the 
grounds of Connecticut's Capitol. Nathaniel 
Lyon has no statue there. Commodore Hull 
of the Revolution and Commodore Foote of 
the later and greater war have not been 
honored in that way ; the same thing is true 
of the members of that remarkable group of 
Connecticut statesmen that served in the 
continental congresses, took so notable a 
part in the making of the Constitution, and 
furnished advisers to the first Presidents. 
True, the sculptured effigies of Jonathan 
Trumbull and Roger Sherman look down 
from their perches over a Capitol door-way 
upon grounds which Putnam, Knowlton, 
Governor Hubbard and Dr. Wells have at 
present all to themselves. 

Before another statue is placed in those 
grounds of the Capitol it will be well for 
their responsible custodians to consult the 
history of Connecticut and their own sense 
of proportion. — Hartford Courant. 



The July Coming Age opens the second 
volume of this vigorous and able Boston 




BURNED OUT 

at the Howard Building Fire, but 

IN BUSINESS AGAIN 

at 164 State St., Olds & Whipple Bldg. 

MANTELS 




HANDSOME 
ASSORT- 
MENT. 

LOOK THEM 



Get our prices before buying. 

The HARTFORD MANTEL and TILE GO. 

Jj. M. GLOVER, Manager. 

Manufacturers aiul Manufacturers' Agents. 
Mosaics, Interior Marble and Slate; Gas Combination 
and Electric Light Fixtures; Fireplace Furniture of all 
Descriptions. 

164 State St., Hartford, Ct. Telephone Connection. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Have a £> £• ^ 
Brass Band, & 
Male Quartette, 

or any musical selec- 
tion to order. 



The best of the Talk- 
ing Machine Family is 
either the Grapho- 
phone or Phonograph. 

They want a home. 
Why not adopt them. 
They are the most M 
talented musicians, 
will comfort the sick, 
cheer up the saddest 
homes or make a 
happy home more 
cheerful. 





Catalogue on Application. 



LISTEN TO THAT RECORD ! 



Hartford Graphophone Co* 

80 Trumbull Street, HARTFORD, CONN, 



EDWIN T. NORTHAM, 
Manager. 



HISHQLINESS POPE LED XIII 
AWARDS GOLD MEDAL 

In Recognition of gens fits ftecevOed from 






IlIuMNMiH 



MARIANI WINE TONIC 



FOfiBOfir.B/fA/AfAJw MF/FMS 

Spsc/aa Oppsp - 7b a// w7?o wr/fe as menf/or)- 
'//7$ S/?/s paper, we sen of a doo/rcorrfa/n/ng por- 
f fra/fsa/?c/ encforse/rrents o/£MPsr?oPS, £mpp£SS> 

Pfl/AfC£S,CAPD/A/AL5, AfiC/JB/SHOPS, 3/2 Of 0f/?erc//Sf//?~ 

gu/s/?ed personages. 

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fOff SAl£ATAU DfiaGG/STS £l/£/?YW//£fi£. AM/DSl/BSr/ri/TZS. B£WA/?£Of/M/rAT/OA/S. 

PA/t/s-l/Bou/eydrafMciussmdm LOAfDON-83 Mortimer Sr. AtQ/7rrea/~87$rJamesSt. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued. 

jview. The frontispiece is an admirable 
all-page portrait of the Rev. Heber Newton, 
nd the eminent Episcopalian divine con- 
ributes a conversation of exceptional interest 
n " The Progress of the Past Fifty Years." 
'he second conversation is by Viola Allen on 
I Glory Quayle and ' The Christian.' " It is 
preceded by an extended critical review of 
lall Caine's play of "The Christian," written 
[y Mr. B. O. Flower. Dr. John Thomas 
Rodman, the scholarly author, contributes a 
lelightful reminiscent paper on u The Brook 
Farm Association ;" but perhaps no contribu- 
tion in this issue will be more enjoyed by the 
teneral reader than E. P. Powell's essay on 
I Harriet Martineau in America." Rev. W. 
G. Todd appears in one of the most masterly 
philosophical papers of recent months, en- 
titled "A Theory of Immorality." There are 
numerous other able and interesting articles 
I this number. The Coming Age has taken 
a front rank among the able reviews of 
present-day thought. It is optimistic and 
constructive in character, and aims to educate 
and stimulate the moral as well as intellectual 
side of life. Price, 20 cents. 

Smith 6° McDonough, Iiartford, Conn. 



The following is a copy of an essay on 
George Washington, written by a girl in a 
secondary class of one of the public schools 
of Philadelphia. It was meant as a serious 
effort : 

" I will tell you the story in History of 
George Washington, George Washington was 
born Feb. 12, 1726. 

" He was educated at West Point and after 
graduating served in the Mexican War. 

" When the French and India War broke 
out he was made Captain, and General and 
Major and performed many imported ser- 
vices. 

"In 1759 He rezined and married Mrs. 
Martha Acusta, and went to live on his estate 
at Mt. Vernon. In the Virginia Legislature, 
of which he was a member, he took the part 



INSURED 
INVESTMENTS. 

Bristol, Conn., Nov. 12, 1898. 

Mr. E. C. Linn, Sec'y and Treas., 

The Connecticut Building and Loan Association, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Dear Sir; I am just in receipt of the check of 
the Association for $1,091.00, in payment of the 
maturity value of ten shares (insured class) , held 
by my late husband, which also includes the reserve 
accumulations of the shares. 

I wish to thank you for your promptness in the 
settlement of this claim. Yours truly, 

Clara J. Clayton. 

$10 a month for 120 months produces $2,000, 
which will be paid in cash upon maturity of shares, 
or at prior death the proceeds of the life insurance 
will be paid to heirs together with cash withdrawal 
value of shares. 

Assets, Over, .... $850,000.00 

Guarantee Fund, (paid in Cash), 100,000.00 

The Connecticut Building and 

Loan Association, 

252 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn* 



STRENGTH 




goes hand in hand 
with HEALTH 
Both can 
be obtain- . 

cdbyus_ 4k 

ing our 
new meth- 
od of Muscle Build ^ 
ing without the 
aid of apparatus 
for the Athlete or In- 
valid, Student or Business Man. You can increase 
your strength, build up your health and improve 
your form by this new method of exercise.^ Illus- 
trated Book containing rules and full particulars, 
50c Add. Strength, Dcpt. A, Box 722, H'fM, Ct. 



A GOOD ARTICLE 
BEARS PUSHING. 

If you want to try Magazine Advertising and do 
not care to expend such great amounts of money as the 
large national magazines demand, just try the 

Connecticut Magazine 

and satisfy yourself whether magazine advertising pays. 

MAGAZINE ADVERTISING is acknowledged 
as attractive and profitable. 

OVER FOUR YEARS has built up a splendid cir- 
culation for the Connecticut Magazine. 

YOU CAN REACH the southern New England 
trade through our columns. 

COVERS A LARGER TERRITORY than any 
other publication in Southern New England. 

12,000 copies per issue is the circulation of the 
Connecticut Magazine. 

...TRY IT... 

Published at Hartford, Conn. 
Subscription— SI. 00 a year. 10 Cents a Copy. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 






TO NEW YORK DAILY. 




Stopping at all Connecticut River I andings. 



LOW RATES. 
Quick Dispatch. 



Passenger and 
Freight Line. 



SECURITY. 
COMFORT. 



REFRESHING 
SLEEP. 



Passenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. m. and 
forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecticut river, and 
points North, East and West from Hartford. We also have 
through traffic arrangements with lines out of New York or 
points South and West, and shipments can be forwarded on 
through rates, and Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the 
Company. For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co.== 

Steamers "Middletown" and "Hartford"' — Leave Hart- 
ford from foot State St. at 5 p. m.— Leave New York from Pier 
24, East River, at 5 p. m. — Daily except Sundays. 



CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY. 

Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. 



Mi it U 



For 1899, 

Is now ready for distribution. 



It contains over one hundred attractive half- 
tone illustrations, and is without doubt the 
handsomest book of the kind ever issued by 
any tailroad. It contains an increased list of 
Hotels and Boarding Houses, gives rates for 
board aud all information sought after by those 
intending to summer in the country. Don't 
neglect getting a copy. Sent free for postage, 
six^ cents. 

W. J. MARTIN, Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Hartford, Conn. 



The Easy-Rolling and Graceful Wakefield. 




These are the carriages we " PUSH " and are the only 
ones you should do likewise to. Wakefield's are both 
lighter and stronger than any other make— there's no 
such thing as racking them. You can sell a Wakefield 
after you re through with it— it'll all be there. 

GEO. W. FLINT 6 CO., 

Leading Housefurnishers. 61 Asylum Street. 



q0b*&& 



J7U4J/: 



&30TO7Z.30. 

/TWO 







TAKE E LEVATOR 



0?&M>!. 



METAL LATH. 

This article is fast superseding the wooden spruce lath for plas- 
tering. It is fire-proof, does not shrink and thereby crack the 
plastering, and is exceedingly durable, takes less space and holds 
plaster the best. 

JOHN B. CLAPP & SON, 



6/ Market Street, 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



The Auctioneer, BESTOR. 

Sales conducted throughout the sta'e on Real 
Estate, Land Plots, Farms, Live Stock, Store 
Stocks, Furniture, Art Sales, etc. Write me 
if you wish to sell. 



Howard C. Bestor, 



Hartford, Ct. 



Plc.ise mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued. 

against the oppression of England. In 1843 
he was Elected President of Congress and 
took an active part in Public affairs. He 
fought many battles and finally captured 
General Lee and his whole army, April 9, 
1865. He finally surrendered at Yorktown, 
under Lord Cornwallis, and the war ended 
1760. Thus he owes the liberty to us, and 
he is called the father of this country. The 
constitution having been adapted, George 
Washington was made President of the 
United States. He served two terms, but 
refused to serve a third term, having taken a 
severe cold from a ride in the rain. He died 
at Mt. Vernon, aged 67 years." 

— Philadelphia Ledger. 



The little Dobsonville, (Conn.) school- 
house is located on the line of the Hartford, 
Manchester and Rockville Tramway Co., 
about midway between Talcottville and 
Rockville. An observer on a passing trolley 
car one hot and stifling afternoon in June 
noticed that the young mistress of the school 
had deserted the building and assembled her 
scholars under the shady elms in school 
yard. Here she conducted the session. 
Closest attention was being given to studies 
as scarcely one of the scholars looked up as 
the car passed by. A little more of such 
good judgment and less of the rigid and 
unnecessary discipline on the part of tutors, 
that characterizes the majority of schools to- 
day, would make the scholars' efforts more 
interesting and accomplish the right end. 

We are inclined to believe this teacher a 
success. 



The Winsted Herald of some weeks ago 
had^the following from a letter found by a 
mail agent on the Naugatuck division : 

"Bear me away at a rapid rate, 
To Thomaston, in Connecticut State; 
And when Fred. Morton comes walking in 
Hand me to him and see him grin." 
Verily, poetry is making big jumps some- 
where in this country. 



PRESERVE 

mm QUARTERLIES 

They will make a valuable addition to 
your library when they are bound. 

AVE BIND THEM in Russia Back and Corners, 
Raised Bands, with Marble Paper Sides, $1.00 

Per Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Back and Corners, as above, $1.25 

All kinds and qualities of Magazine Binding. 

Blank Books of every description with flat opening backs. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 

HARTFORD, CONN, 



•DE5I0HER- 
MOVERS 
'FRKEER6! 

flARTFOKE 

)^I1EC^aJT , 



At MADISON, 



Connecticut's 
finest 



BEACH. 



Choice lots for sale, directly on the water, 
others a short distance back with shore 
privilege, good boating, fishing and bathing 

Furnished Cottages to Rent. J # M. HULL, 



NON-QUIN J5EK. 

without producing dizziness or ringing in the ears 
BOX SENT to any address on receipt of'25 cts. All Druggists. 

NON-QUIN CO., Hartford, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



JUST OUT— "PICTURESQUE CONNECTICUT. 



ft 




Offer Holds Good Until September First. 

HE PUBLISHERS of The Connecticut Magazine are not endeavoring to interest their 
readers in a catch-penny scheme, but would ask that you examine the plan outlined 
herewith and try to concur with our efforts as far as possible. Notice that the page 
opposite is divided into ten squares, each numbered consecutively, marked Connecti- 
cut Magazine Purchase Slip, containing blank space to be filled out. We ask our 
readers to cut out these slips separately then look over the advertising pages of the January, 
February, March, April, May, June and July numbers of this year. If you have a purchase to 
make try to patronize those whose ads. appear in our columns. They are reliable houses or 
we would not carry their ads. With each purchase you make, present one of these slips for 
the signature or stamp of the advertiser. 

To any one returning ten slips, properly signed, to The Connecticut Magazine office on or 
before September ist, we will present a handsome thirty-two page book, entitled "Picturesque 
Connecticut," showing handsome half-tone views in different parts of the state, just published 
by The Connecticut Magazine Company. The book will be a credit to any home, and will 
bring out the most attractive scenic features of our state. 

The collection is composed of the choicest of those views that have appeared in The 
Connecticut Quarterly during the past four years. The Edition is limited. 

tf^This offer will apply to purchases made of any advertiser using space in the columns of 
The Connecticut Magazine during the months of January, February, March, April, May, 
June or July, 1899. 

If you purchase by mail, enclose one of the slips with order, and request the advertiser 
to fill it out and return. 



Moral. Help the ADVERTISER who is helping US to give YOU a good magazine. 

SEE OPPOSITE PAGE. BT" 







. 








~ " ." "" ~ 


J 


SfCome decorative Study... 


A N appropriate design and a proper blending of colors for 
■**• home decoration is acquired after years of experience. An 
ability to produce a happy combination of the practical and the 
artistic is the secret of our success. We have made beautiful 
many of the finest homes in Connecticut. We give estimates on 
Church Work and Public Buildings, for Fresco Painting, 
Canvas Ceilings, Paper Hanging, Draping. 

Write us or call on us for ideas (*m*99oun & Qmirlott 
on artistic interior decorating . <*rOSSCup CC JuuUGll, 

75 Pratt St , Rms. 22 and 23 Steams'* Bldg., Hartford, Ct. 



WEDDING PRESENTS 



%H ^H *H 



Chosen from our unlimited assortments of STERLING 
SILVER AND SILVER PLATED WARE are always 
appropriate and always give lasting satisfaction 



"We arc Makers 

of the 

World Famous 




Trade Mark: 



ROGERS 




SILVER 

PLATED 

WARE. 



Send For Retail 
Catalogue. 



"anchor" brand. 

WM. ROGERS MFG. CO. 

Offices and Retail Salesrooms, Market Street, Hartford, Conn. 



Please mention The CoNNFrTTrTTT MAr:A7rNrF when vnn write to advertisers. 



«=S«r SEE OPPOSITE PAGE. 



CUT OUT THESE SLIPS. 



No. 1 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
~^~ PURCHASE SLIP for 

1899 

The Publishers would request their advertisers to either 
affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 2 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
? PURCHASE SLIP for 

1899 

The Publishers would request their advertisers to either 
affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 3 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
~* PURCHASE SLIP for 

1899 

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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 6 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
F PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 7 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
— * — PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 4 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
*■ PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 5 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
i? PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 8 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
— * — PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



The Publishers would request their advertisers to either 
affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. 9 



CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



The Publishers would request their advertisers to either 
affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



No. IO CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
— 5? — PURCHASE SLIP for 



1899 



The Publishers would request their advertisers to either 
affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail. 



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' 



CAN SECURE ANY OF OUR ^C-Lliv^ 1 i IXillVIl U lVlO 

by sending its five (5) new yearly subscriptions to The Connecticut 
Magazine at $J.OO each* 

Send in each subscription as it is taken and we will give you due credit for each. On the 
remittance of the fifth we will mail you postpaid your choice of any one of the premiums below 



EITHER OF THESE 

Handsome and Useful Ingersoll Watches. 





3 O 
O 

8 6 

.3 tJo 



.a © 



££ 



>G a> 



& 



Nickel or gilt, stem wound and stem 
set, and WARRANTED for one year. 
If the watch is not what we guarantee 
it to be we will replace it by another. 
Your choice of either pocket watch or 
the new bicycle watch and attach- 
ment. Watch can be attached to handle bar of any wheel at a 
moment's notice 

Your Choice— Famous Arms Pocket Books. 








&h . 






;// 



Fine Morocco Ladies Pocket 
Book with card pocket. Specie 
pocket, three extra pockets with 
button locks ; card pocket with 
tuck. 



Fine Morocco Combination 
Safety Purse and Pocket-Book. 
Strongly made in neat and at- 
tractive styles, and adapted for 
gentlemen's or ladies' use. 

Three pockets ; double lock. 



Address THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn, 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Covers Greater Area than Any Other Sprinkler Made 



Height 
17 in. 

feint 

6 IDs. 



Will 
sprinkle 
an area 
four times 
greater 
than any 
other 
Sprinkler 
made. 




THE globe, or body, of the sprinkler is made in two parts, and by means of the swiftly revolving arms, and interme- 
diate gears, the upper half is made to revolve slowly, carrying the hose nozzle, from which a full stream of water is 
thrown far out beyond the sprinkle of the arms, thereby covering a much larger space than any other sta- 
tionary sprinkler. W ith an oidinaiy pressure of water, 20 pounds or upwards, it will thoroughly sprinkle an 
area 80 feet in diameter. The nozzle and the tips on end of arms are adjustable and can be set so as to sprinkle any desired 
space, or the nozzle can be set perpendicular to send the water upwa ds in a straight stream like a fountain. 

A perforated disc, or rosette, is packed in each box and can be attached in place of the nozzle tip, discharging instead of 
a solid straight stream a very fine mist at the centre of the sprinkle of the revolving arms. 

With the exception of the legs all parts are of solid brass, heavily nickeled, making it the most durable, attractive and 
efficient sprinkler ever placed on the market. 

E. STEBBINS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

SOLE AGENTS AND MANUFACTURERS, SPRINGFIELD, MASS,, U. S. A. 

Agents Wanted Everywhere Made for J. B. Fellows & Co., 90 Canal St., Boston. Mass. 



Please mention the Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




Be Sure 
You Get 
This 
Package. 

Celluloid Needle Case. 
Three f «' a Leather Card Case. 



Both useful and pretty 

BAKER'S EXTRACTS 

AT ALL GROCEKS. 



SOUVENIRS. 

BAKER EXTRACT CO, 



SPRINGFIELD, ivtass. 



WMl 



SEND FOR FREE BOTTLE. 

TRUE BEAUTY is a combination of 

HANDSOME FEATURES and a SOFT VELVETY SKIN. 



JF YOU 
LACK A 

CLEAR 
SKIN 

consult 
POYAL 
PEARL. 

A 
FREE 
TRIAL 

is the surest 
way to 
convince. 




Thousands of 
refined ladies 
praise it. 

We will mail 
|||H| you a small 



bottle 



ROYAL PEARL 



and descriptive circular free of all expense if 
we receive your address before July 15th. 

P. O. Bo^c25, 
Hartford, Ct. 



The H. R. Hale Co. 




PERFECT = 
Dress Shields 



/TRADE MARK 



OMO 



No Rubber, 
No Chemicals. 

Absolutely 
Odorless 
and 
Impervious 

Redfern endorses 
them, and so does 
every other dress- 
maker. 

Every Pair 
Guaranteed. 



Manufactured by the 



WttfN YOU BUY A SHITO-PREMIER; 
THE WRITING MACHINE EMBODYING All 
THE BEST FEATURES IN TYPEWRITER 
CONSTRUCTION. dmmAWOmMlt: 

™<§mith Premier $™*cuse,n.y. 

TtPtWRITIR CO. a s. A. 



Omo Manufacturing Co 

MIDDLETOWN, CONN. 



For Sale by every Dry Goods Dealer in the 
United States. a^" Write for Booklet giving 
description of its manufacture. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Vol. V. 



August, 1899. 



No. 8. 



THE 



CONNECTICUT 



IP 1 

AN ILLVSTRATED 
*\ONTHtY 



UM 



rzmti 



■ 



SB 



IN THIS NUMBER. 

Mystic* & & *^ 

The New President of Yale 
College in \ 11%. 

Milford Cemetery* 

An Old Time Hero. 

Etc., Etc. 

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THE 

Connecticut Magazine 

AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, 
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AUGUST, \ 899. 



Vol. v. CONTENTS. No. 8. 



Mystic. (Frontispiece.) 

Mystic. Illustrated. William Allen Wilbur, 399 

Human Nature. Poem. Frank L. Hamilton, 419 

The New President of Yale College in 1778. Amelia Leavitt Hill, 420 

An Old Time Hero. — Commodore Charles Morris Ellen D. Lamed, 423 
List of Burials, Center Church Burying Ground, Hartford. Annotated by Alary K. Talcott, 426 

OF Nance. Poem. Fred J, Eaton t 429 

Milford Cemetery. Illustrated I. M. Louise Greene, 430 

The Pearl Street Ecclesiastical Society. Illustrated. Note by Editor, 434 

Departments. — Genealogical Department. 436 

Editorial 442 

George C. Atwell, Editor. Edward B. Eaton, Business Manager. 



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28 




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The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. V. 



August, 1899. 



No. 8. 



MYSTIC. 



BY WILLIAM ALLEN WILBUR. 



JUST after the War of 181 2, the 
schooner " Mary," a Mystic vessel 
hailing from New London, was visited, 
while lying at Dublin, Ireland, by a British 
officer who asked Captain George Wolf, 
her commander, if he knew a place near 
New London by the name of Mystic. 
" It's a cursed little hornet's nest," said 
the English officer ; " those Mystic fellows 
tried to blow up our ships with their 
torpedoes. We meant to burn their place, 
and we came nigh doing it, too." How 
they tried it, and how they failed is another 
story that would be appreciated by the 
yachtsman who attempts to come up 
channel by night. It was a war time 
reputation, fairly enough won, no doubt, 
but first impressions are different now-a- 
days. 

About a mile up from the Sound, on 
both banks of the Mystic river, lies the 
village of Mystic. On the east along the 
river a plain reaches back a quarter of a 
mile to a hill ; on the west, the hill-side 
comes down to the river. And over the 
plain and the hill-side the roofs and the 
steeples appear amid the dark green of 
the maples, and the yellow afternoon light 

399 



touches white walls and the leaves and the 
still water where sail-boats and launches 
come in to the wharves. The first view is 
usually from the river, where the " Shore 
Line " railroad bridge crosses just below 
the town. This first view is the true one : 
historically and artistically, the river has 
made Mystic — the whale-ships, the clip- 
per-ships, the steam-ships, the yachts, the 
picturesque shores, and the breath of the 
salt sea which fills with singular content- 
ment her four thousand inhabitants and 
brings back with unfailing devotion her 
wandering sons when the summer months 
come around. 

Happier than those peoples declared 
happy because they have no history, are 
those that are happy and fortunate because 
of their history. Mystic has borne " the 
white man's burden " from that June 
morning, in 1638, when Captain John 
Mason and ninety men fought the battle 
of the Pequot War, on the crest of the 
west hill overlooking the river. The 
Indian fortress was a stockade surrounding 
a village ; from four to seven hundred 
Pequots were there. The Pequot name 
was so terrible in those days that the 



400 



MYSTIC. 



Narragansett allies, who had led the 
column in its march through the Narra- 
gansett country, became very much afraid 
when they got upon Pequot ground. " Let 
them stay back, and see how Englishmen 
will fight," said Mason to Uncas. They 



turned. Save a handful of Pequots who 
broke through the line, all perished in the 
fight or the fire. The site of the fort is a 
hayfield to-day, and two hundred yards to 
the south on the highway — " Pequot 
Avenue " it is called — is a statue in bronze 




saw some new things that morning. The 
single Pequot guard discovered the 
soldiers in the gray light and gave the 
alarm, but it was too late. Into the north- 
east entrance the English came, and the 
fighting began, in desultory fashion while 
the Indians were rousing themselves to 
the crisis, and then in deepening fury 
until overmastering numbers began to bear 
the English back. " We must burn them ! ' ' 
cried Mason, and seizing a torch he 
started the fire. The north wind carried 
the flames, and the tide of battle was 



ALONG SHORE — MASON'S ISEAND. 

of John Mason. The tablet on the base 
bears this inscription : 

ERECTED A. D. 
by the State of Connecticut, 
to commemorate the heroic achievement of 

MAJOR JOHN MASON, 

and his comrades ; who near this spot in 

1637, overthrew the Pequot Indians, 

and preserved the settlements 

from destruction. 

The muster roll of the men who fought 
with Mason would be prized now-a-days 
by the makers of genealogies, but it is not 
known to be in existence. The sword of 
John Mason is still a cherished possession 
of his descendants, who live to-day upon 
the beautiful island which was granted 
their ancestor out of the land he had 
wrested from the Pequots. It is a good 
sword, a kind of Puritan sword — plain and 



MYSTIC. 



401 





THE MASON MONUMENT. 

strong, straight and double-edged ; it was 
a piece of work the maker was willing to 
sign his name to, for upon the blade is the 
inscription, "Me fecit Soligen." 

The first sea-fight along the New 
England shore was, probably, that of John 
Gallup with the murderers of Oldham, off 
Block Island. Oldham's sloop was spied 
full of Indians, and Gallup began the 
action by ramming- his enemy twice and 
then boarding. It was a grim affair, and 
it went the Anglo-Saxon way, as most 
sea-fights do. Only one Indian was carried 
into Saybrook, and he confessed that it 
was a Pequot sachem that stirred up the 
Block Island Indians to kill Oldham. It 
was the deposition of John Gallup 's son 
John to Governor Winthrop, in regard to 
this affair, that fixed the responsibility on 



the Pequots, " whereupon," says the old 
record, "that just war was commenced 
against the bloody Pequots and they'r 
associates." Among the Connecticut 
colonial records is the following : " Feb- 
ruary 9, 1652-3, John Gallup in consider- 
ation and with respect unto the services 
his father hath done for the country, hath 
given him up the river of Mistick, which 
side he will 300 acres of upland." This 
together with a further grant made the 
next year included what is now known as 
the Whitehall farm on the east side of the 
river. It is the old name in remembrance 
of some English Whitehall. This John 
Gallup was sixty years old when King 
Philip's war broke out. He was one of 
the five Connecticut captains in the 
Swamp Fight ; he led the friendly Mohe- 
gans, about 150 of them, and he was 
killed after he had entered the fortress, 
tradition says by a stray 
shot from the English. 
It was winter, Decem- 
ber 19, 1675, and he 
was buried in the swamp 
where he fell. This 
story is but one among 
many others of the toll 
in sacrifice and blood 
paid by the fathers to Z 
win and to hold this > 
valley. They loved it ; v 
it was their Canaan — z 
a comparison instituted < 

by themselves — aland 

z 
of promise, given them ~ 

of the Lord to conquer. " 
Their plans were adopt- 
ed after prayer, and 
their victories were re- 
membered w T ith thanks- 
giving and praise. They 
smote the heathen hip 
and thigh, man fashion, 
and had they not done 



402 



MYSTIC. 



it the heathen 
would have 
destroyed 
them utterly 
and no gene- 
ration of sen- 
timentalists 
would have 
risen up to 
lament the 
cruelty of the 
fathers. 

Nearly every 
person whose 
family is three 
generations 
native to the 
Mystic valley, 
is directly descended from the first set- 
tlers. Large tracts of land have never 
been deeded from the time of the original 
grants, but have remained in the same 
family eight and nine generations. Land 
is so held in this valley in the name of 
Burrows, Denison, Fish, Mason, Packer, 
Stanton. 

In December, 1652, a highway was laid 
out from the head of Poquonock Cove 
running eastward to the Mystic River ; 
this corresponds with the present New 
London road over the hill. The first 






THE DlyDRKDGK WOIyF HOUSE. 



THE OU) DENISON HOUSE. 

settlers on the west side were Robert 
Burrows, John Packer, and Robert Parke. 
In April 1651, Robert Burrows was granted 
" a parcel of land between the west side 
of the river and a high mountain of rocks." 
This Burrows land was the west bank of 
the river running from Old Field north to 
Great Hill, and extending west to the top 
of Prospect Hill. John Packer was granted 
land west of Burrows, running from a little 
north of the present New London road 
south to Palmer's Cove, 
and extending west to 
Flanders. John Fish 
was in Mystic as early 
as 1655, and his son 
Samuel owned about a 
thousand acres of land 
north of the Burrows 
and Packer grants and 
extending west to Flan- 
ders. The oldest Packer 
house is said to have 
stood a few rods west of 
the present West Mystic 
railway station ; the first 



MYSTIC 



403 



Burrows house was where the Clift 
brothers' house now is ; and the Fish 
homestead stood between the present 
farmhouse of Alden Fish and Pequot 
Avenue. 

On the east side of the river, the land- 
grants were as follows : Mason's Island, 
the Indian name of which was Chippa- 
chaug, was set off to Captain Mason, 
together with adjoining land 
on the mainland, extending 
north on the east side of 
Pequotsepos, now Williams 
Cove ; the land between the 
river and the cove, being the 
entire east plain of the present 
village of Mystic, was granted 
to Captain George Denison ; 
north of the Denison land 



yards to the south-west, across the cove 
and within the original Denison grant, is 
the Denison burying ground : two miles 
up the river, on the Whitehall grant, in a 
field to the west of the Old Mystic road, 
is the Gallup burying ground. Across the 
river, by the side of the old New London 
road on the very crest of the hill is the 
"Packer Burying Ground." This must 




SHIP ANNIE M'. SMULL — 1868. 

along the river, was Stanton land ; north 
of that was Gallup land before referred 
to as Whitehall. 

The old burying-grounds are places of 
interest in these days of genealogical 
enthusiasm. Just north of the new 
Stonington road and east of Williams 
Cove, within the old Mason grant, is the 
Mason burying ground ; three hundred 



have been near the junction 
of Burrows, Fish, and Packer 
land ; and it was used by 
these three families as a 
place of burial. 

Mystic did not grow com- 
pactly along the river until 
the rise of the shipping bus- 
iness. At the time of the 
great storm, September 23, 
1 815, there were but ten dwelling houses 
on the east side of the river and on the 
west side under the hill, from the old 
Randall house north to Long Bar, there 
were nine houses. The history of these 
houses is full of such things as people 
like to hear, and there are stories as 
good as any that have been told. The 
Denison House, built by fohn Denison in 



404 



MYSTIC. 



1668, had the cherished associations of its 
years,and when it was taken down, in 1883, 
family mementos were made from its 
oak timbers. The oldest Denison house, 
that of Capt. George Denison, was over 
the hill to the north-east, at the head of 
Pequotsepos brook. It is said that Adin 
Wilbur built the house known as the 
Eldredge Wolf house ; if so it is connected 
with a tragedy of the Revolution. In the 
spring of 1779, tne sloop Eagle, privateer, 
sailed from New London. Daniel 
Eldredge of Mystic was lieutenant, and 
with him were many Mystic men. The 
Eagle was successful; on May 9, 1779 



■:--.<■-■■■■>. .«• 



were beaten off. Two adventures at 
Groton Long Point, one of which cost the 
British dear, attested the readiness of the 
men of this valley to take the offensive in 
the war. Mystic, in fact, had a privateer 
of her own — the barge Yankee ; this was 
a twelve oared barge, forty-two feet long. 
She made many successful ventures, 
taking prizes and spreading terror to the 
enemy's craft from the Connecticut River 
to Vineyard Sound. From " Historical 
Leaves," contributed to The Mystic 
Pioneer, in 1859, by Rev. F. Denison, 
the following list is taken of the men 
constituting the crew of the Yankee. The 






GEORGE GREENMAN. 



CHAREES MAEEORY. 
PIONEER SHIP BUIEDERS. 



B. E. HOXIE. 



she took six prizes, and details of men 
for the captured vessels weakened her own 
crew. The prisoners rose and killed all 
but one who slipped in blood and fell 
beneath a sail. John Sawyer was killed 
by a marlinspike, and Adin Wilbur was 
beheaded. This was between Montauk 
and Fisher's Island. Lieutenant Eldredge 
from one of the prizes, saw the massacre 
but could carry no help. 

Mystic took an active part in the War 
of 1 81 2. The sloop Victory was attacked 
off Ram Point by English barges, and 
with the help of the smack Charleston, 
which ran down from Mystic, the enemy 



list was verified by surviving members of 
the crew. 

Lemuel Burrows, Captain. 

Amos Wheeler, Lieutenant. 

Peter Washington, Boarding Master. 

John Park, Pilot. 



Nathan Eldredge. 
James Sawyer. 
Dudley Packer. 
Henry Bailey. 
Eldredge Wolf. 
Allen Holdredge. 
Roswell Packer. 
Robert Deuce. 



Abel Eldredge. 
William Wilbur. 
George Bennett. 
Havens Sawyer. 
George Wolf. 
Peter Baker. 
Ezekiel Tufts. 
Nathaniel Niles. 



Elam Eldredge. 



MYSTIC. 



405 



When Stonington was attacked by the 
British fleet., in August. 1 Si 4. the following 
volunteers from Mystic assisted in the 
defence of the town : Jeremiah Holmes. 
Nathaniel Clift. Simeon Haley. Jeremiah 
Haley. Frederick Denison. F.benezer 
Denison. Isaac Denison. Frederick Haley. 
Captain JeremiahHolmes was in command 
of the battery of two eighteen pounders 
on the tenth of August. He had been 
impressed into the English Navy, and in 



naturally here. The site a the woolen 
mill at Old Mystic would not impress one 
as possessing natural advantages for ship- 
building, yet vessels were built there and 
were floated down into deeper water by 
means of scows. Silas E. Burrows re- 
membered going with his parent- to see 
the launch of the ship Huntress at the 
"Narrows" about 1S04. Many vessels. 
some ::' them of considerable size., were 
ui't at Old Mystic : among them the 








,:^zr-?h: 



ANDREW TAC] 



APTAES" TOHX E. WILLIAMS. 



three year's sen ice — most of it as captain 
of a gun — had acquired -that skill in gun 
practice which enabled him to cripple 
Captain Hardy's fleet with many shots 
etweet . and water. If. as the ballad 

says : 

It cost the king ten thousand pounds 

7? \l - l t— '.: at St :::::_:::: 

the king couid account it his wages to 
Jeremiah Holmes. 

Ship-building is indigenous to the 
Mystic vallev. Wood takes to water very 



man-of-war brig Fiambeau, built for the 
Government during the War of 1 5 1 2 ; and 
a ship of 550 tons, the John Baring, built 
at the ■•Narrows" as late as 1838. But 
while the business was developing so well 
at the Head of Mystic, :: is interesting to 
note that much had already been done 
farther down the river. Mr. Burrows wrote 
to The Mystic Pioneer in February. 
: - : : " To none are we more indebted 
for the origin of ship-building at Mystic. 
and the enterprising pros] er : of the vil- 



406 



MYSTIC. 




CAPTAIN JOSEPH WARREN HOLMES. 

lages on that beautiful sheet of water, 
than to Eldredge Packer, the builder, and 
Capt. Edward Packer, the employer, 
which was a very early period. It was 
Uncle Eldredge (as then all called him ) , 
that built, the large fleet of fishermen 
which first brought the wealth from the 
south to make Mystic what it is. He 
built the sloop Fox, Capt. Crary, captured 
by the British as she was coming from 
North Carolina with a cargo of corn, 
and fitted as a man-of-war cruiser ; and 
he built the Hero, commanded by Capt. 
A. H. Burrows, who, with thirty-three 
Mystic volunteers, went out to the cruising 
ground of the Fox, near Block Island, 
and brought her into Mystic as a prize 
with Lieut. Claxton, the third lieutenant 
of the Ramilies seventy-four, as com- 
mander." There is a certain embarrass- 
ment in writing of things so remote that 
the memory of man runneth not to the 
contrary, but it is within reason to call 
Eldredge Packer the father of ship-build- 
ing in Mystic. 

The Mystic ships mean more to Mystic 
than the product of so much industrial 



skill representing the business capacity of 
the place in past years. The best life of 
the town went to sea in the ships. There 
were sea captains living on every street ; 
Gravel street on the west side by the 
river, and Skipper street on the west hill 
were lined with the homes of the captains. 
There was no port of entry in the world 
where a Mystic man had not been. The 
whale-ships had searched out the remote 
corners of the world, and the clipper-ships 
had followed the main lines of commerce. 
Every house had souvenirs of travel, and 
in every family was some one who had 
travelled the world over. The memories 
of the ships ! This is Mystic's romance ; 
and sometimes men talk together of the 
ships that they built and owned and sailed, 
and speak with kindness in their voices, 
as men speak of their own children. 
These memories are as dear as those of 
the poet's youth : 

"I remember the black wharves and the 
slips, 

And the sea-tides tossing free ; 
And Spanish sailors with bearded lips, 
And the beauty and mystery of the ships, 
And the magic of the sea." 




DAVID OSCAR RICHMOND. 



MYSTIC. 



407 



The whaling business rote 
and declined in Mystic be- 
tween 1830 and 1850. The 
whale-ships are not included 
in the statistics already given. 
Charles Mallory was owner 
and agent of about nineteen ; 
and some of these he built. 
Jedediah Randall and his sons 
were owners and agents of 
five, or more. The ships weie 
small, averaging only 300 
tons, and full-rigged, double- 
decked ships too. Those who 
remember them can hardly 
appreciate the difficulty in 
trying to imagine them — the 
old-fashioned double topsails, topgallant- 
sails, royals, and all to a scale of 300 or 
even 200 tons ! One ceases to wonder at 
the old print of the Mary Ann (if that was 
the name) of New Bedford attacked by a 
whale. We read of "the famous Aeronaut, 
blunt and tough as a beetle, the Meteor, 
Bingham, and Governor Endicott — heavy 
old ships, and the trim little Blackstone." 
The headquarters for these vessels when 




ARTIST CHARGES H. DAVIS AT EASEL. 

they were in port were Mallory's wharf on 
the east side above the bridge, and Ran- 
dall's wharf by the old red store, whose 
foundations may be seen aboveRichmond's 
boat shop. And many in Mystic remem- 
ber very well the return of the deep-laden 
vessels, the hoisting out of the casks, the 
heaving down of the ships to be coppered 
as they lay at the wharves, the teeming 
life of the time — the sail-makers, the ris;- 




SOLDIERS' MONUMENT AND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 



408 



MYSTIC. 




l'EACE TEMPLE — HOME OF THE SUMMER SCHO0E 

gers, the coopers, the sailors ; and then 
at dusk the Kanakas would row and sing 
upon the river. 

After the decline of whaling came the 
clipper-ships. This was from 1850 to 
1870. Space would fail to tell of these 
ships and their various fortunes. The 
names of the largest of them are these : 
Niagara, E. C. Scranton, David Crockett, 
Belle Wood, Leah, Atmosphere, Prima 
Donna, Favorita, Frolic — built by George 
Greenman and Company ; Pampero, Sam- 
uel Willets, Mary L. Sutton, Twilight (1), 
Twilight (2), Annie M. Smull— built by 
Charles Mallory ; Electric, Harvey Birch, 
Andrew Jackson — 
built by Irons and 
Grinnell ; B.F.Hoxie, 
Garibaldi, Cremorne, 
Seminole, Helicon, 
Dauntless — built by 
Maxson, Fish and 
Company. 

The shortest pas- 
sage from New York 
to San Francisco ever 
made by a sailing 
vessel is that of the 
clipper-ship Andrew 
Jackson in eighty- the mystic and noank public library 



nine days and four hours. 
This was in the year 
1 860 ; in 1 85 1 the clipper- 
ship Flying Cloud had 
made the voyage in 
eighty - nine days and 
thirteen hours, and those 
who noted the passing of 
the type of the extreme 
clipper-ship believed the 
Flying Cloud would never 
be beaten. And now, the 
ship that had beaten her 
nine hours became an 
object of wonder and ad- 
miration, and the Com- 
modore's pennant was awarded to the Cap- 
tain of the Andrew Jackson. This ship 
was built in Mystic, in 1853-54, and her 
commander was a Mystic man, Captain 
John E. Williams. A San Francisco paper 
of March 25, i860, announcing the arrival 
of the Andrew Jackson and the un- 
precedented time she had made, said : 
" The Andrew Jackson is not an extreme 
clipper, having been built with a view for 
carrying as well as sailing, but she has on 
previous occasions done herself credit 
having made three voyages, the first in 
100 days, the second in 103 days, and the 
third in 102 days, and now in 89 days 




MYSTIC. 



409 



and a few hours." These 
four passages give the 
best average made by any 
ship that ever sailed to 
San Francisco. A chro- 
nometer watch, presented 
to Captain Williams by 
the owners of the ship, 
has the following inscrip- 
tion : "Presented by J. H. 
Brower & Co. to Captain 
J. E.Williams of clipper- 
ship Andrew Jackson for 
shortest passage to San 
Francisco. Time, 89 days, 
4 hours, i860." The record was made in 
a succession of light winds, the ship carry- 





A MYSHC FISHERMAN. 



residence of captain e. p. wiebur. 



ing sky-sails and studding-sails almost the 

entire passage. 

Mystic enjoys 
an add itional 
honor in that she 
has among her 
captains one who 
has made more 
passages around 
Cape Horn, in 
a 1 1 probability, 
than were ever 
made by man 
before. Captain 
Joseph Warren 
Holmes went to 
sea at thirteen. 
He is now mak- 
ing his eightieth 
passage around 
the Horn. In 
April, 1898, just 
after war was 
declared with 
Spain, before 
sailing from San 
Francisco, he 
said to a report- 
er : "I'll fool the 
Spainards, and 
bring my ship 



4io 



MYSTIC. 







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T ' ".: 




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. '1 i i? ' r:: "^> „*„ 




b*p* 




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! 







RESIDENCK OF THE EATE CAPTAIN ELIHU SPICER. 



into New York all right. I haven't any 
weapons on board but a Winchester, and 
I don't think the enemy will ever get 
within range of that. Then I have great 
confidence that the United States will 
have wiped Spain off the earth before the 
Charmer makes the equator." 

The love of sailing for its own sake has 
been fostered by the ships and the sailors. 
Mystic has a record in yacht and boat 
building, which is not 
surpassed in practical 
importance by any 
town along the coast. 
And this record is 
due to the genius and 
the boats of D. O. 
Richmond. The 
model room of the 
New York Yacht 
Club has many of his 
models — Richmond, 
Kate, Haswell, Fanny, 
Sylph, Water Witch. 
Previous to the ad- 
vent of the Puritan 



in 1885, the yacht 
Fanny was, doubt- 
less, the fastest sloop 
in the New York 
Yacht Club. Cap- 
tain Hank Haff, who 
sailed the Vigilant 
and the Defender, is 
reported to have said 
— speaking of a boat 
to meet a new con- 
t es tan t for the 
America's Cup — 
that " a big Fanny 
would do the trick." 
The Haswell was one 
of the most famous 
yachts of her time ; 
in the New York 
Yacht Club annual 
regatta, of June 2, 1859, she not only 
won in her class, but she beat every yacht, 
also, that sailed the race. When the 
American centreboard type returns — and 
it will when the deep keels fail — some new 
Haswell or Fanny will prove the wonder- 
ful possibilities of speed and power in the 
Richmond models. 

The record of Mystic in the Civil War 
is written in the affections of living men 




RESIDENCE OE DANIEE E. PACKER. 



MYSTIC. 



41 i 



and women who 
know well the deeds 
of those who went 
out with the regi- 
ments. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Hiram Ap- 
pelman command- 
ed the Eighth Con- 
necticut at Autie- 
tam, Capt. John K. 
Bucklyn command- 
ed a Rhode Island 
battery at Gettys- 
burg, Colonel War- 
ren W. Packer led 
the Fifth Connec- 
ticut with Sherman on his march to the 
sea. The Soldier's Monument in the vil- 
lage, which was the gift of Mrs. Charles 
H. Mallory, has upon its base the names, 
Drury's Bluff, Port Hudson, Antietam, 
Gettysburg. 

But those days of war seem very remote 
now. Mystic has grown and prospered. 




MEMORIAL ARCH, EiM GROVE CEMETERY. 



In the midst of transition it is hard to 
estimate values, but the outlook brightens. 
A new era has dawned : it is an era of 
romanticism and industrialism. 

Artists have discovered that Mystic is 
picturesque. The drives are declared to 
be unsurpassed anywhere for natural 
beauty and diversity of view. There is 




ROSSIE BROTHERS VELVET MILL. 



412 



MYSTIC. 




IvANTp;RN HII.I, SIIyKX MINK. 

the interest of bird life and of plant life, 
and of places where men have lived and 
died. There is a storied past which 
gives a strangeness and significance to the 
roads, the old houses, the old wharves, 



and the deserted ship-yards. Mr. Charles 
H. Davis, an artist of national reputation, 
has conducted for several years a school 
of art in Mystic, and this has attracted 
many artists from all over the country. 
The pallet and easel have become familiar 
sights along the river, and the village 
streets, and among the hills. The paint- 
ings and sketches of the Roorbachs, and 
the artistic photographic views of Mr. 
George E. Tingley have done much, also, 
to develop appreciation of picturesque 
Mystic. 

The village has six churches and two high 
schools ; the Mystic Valley Institute, now 
entering upon its thirty-first year ; and the 
Mystic Oral School, situated about a mile 
north of the village in the historic mansion 
once the home of Silas E. Burrows. On 
Great Hill is the Grove of the Universal 
Peace Union where annual meetings are 
held, and the sessions, also, of the Summer 
Peace Institute with courses of lectures in 
the arts and sciences. And The Mystic 
Press and the Mystic Journal together 




THE MYSTIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 



MYSTIC. 



413 



with New London and Westerly dailies 
gather and give the news. 

The Mystic and Noank Library was 
founded in 1892, by Captain Elihu Spicer. 
Upon a memorial tablet within the build- 
ing is inscribed — " Elihu Spicer gave this 
Library to the People. 'Large was his 
bounty and his soul sincere !' " The build- 
ing is beautiful ; in design, structure, and 
finish, it satisfies the taste, and it gives to 
books — if one might say so — a modern 



gines, soap, twine velvets, and worsted 
goods. Some of these business interests 
have been identified with Mystic for many 
years. Among the merchants the business 
sign of I. W. Denison and Company has 
been over the store for fifty-one years. 
The Prospect Hill Farm is known for im- 
porting and breeding Brown Swiss cattle- 
There are the Lantern Hill Silex Works, 
Sutton's Spar Yard, Edgcomb's Telescope 
Manufactory, the Wilcox Fertilizer Works 
and the fishing business at Quiambaug, 
the Mystic Twine Company, and the 
Monumental Works of Trevena and of 
McGaughey. The iron industry, begun in 
the early forties, is carried on by the Stan- 
dard Machine Com- 
pany, manufacturing 
bookbinders' and prin- 
ters' machines. 

The best advertised 
and most widely 




background and a me- 
diaeval atmosphere. 
Sprigs of ivy were 
gathered, some years 
ago, by Mrs. Sarah 
Spicer Dickinson, sis- 
ter of Captain Spicer, 
from the church-yard of Gray's Elegy, 
from Blarney Castle, from the home of 
Gladstone, and from the home of Scott ; 
and this ivy now grows upon the walls of 
the Library. The Librarian, Miss A. A. 
Murphy — a teacher for many years — has 
now in her charge a library of well selected 
books foi reference and general reading, 
an influence more subtile and not less 
positive than that of the schools. 

The last decade has been an era of 
industrial development. There are made 
here, spools and braid rolls, globes and 
school supplies, spars, telescopes, ma- 
chinery, monuments, boats, launch en- 
29 



BUSINESS SECTION, 
EAST MAIN STREET. 

known product of Mystic enterprise is, 
doubtless, the " All Healing Pine Tar 
Soap " of the Packer Tar Soap Manufac- 
turing Company ; this company located in 
New York, has its manufacturing plant 
here. Mr. Daniel F. Packer, inventor of 
the soap and founder of the business, is a 
Mystic man belonging to a family that has 
been prominent in the affairs of the valley 
for nearly two hundred and fifty years. 



414 



MYSTIC. 




THE CORDNER HOUSE, PEARE STREET 

Mystic's representative in the ship-build- 
ing business to-day is Captain R. P. Wil- 
bur, a member of 'the Robert Palmer and 
Son Ship-building and Marine Railway 
Company of Noank. This company, 
located at the mouth of the Mystic River, 
built twenty-six vessels last year aggre- 
gating 15,206 tons. 

Within the last few years have come 
accessions of business : the Allen Spool 
and Printing Co., Cheney Globe Co., 
Church's Boat and Repair Shop, Kidder's 
Church Publishing House, Lathrop's 
Naptha Launch Engine Works, Mallory's 
Yacht Exchange, Mystic Electric and Gas 
Light Co., Mystic Manufacturing Co., 
Mystic Distilling Co., the 
Clift Witch Hazel Distilling 
Co., and Rossie Brothers Vel- 
vet Mill. The Mystic In- 
dustrial Company, composed 
largely of Mystic men, erected 
the Velvet Mill and leased 
it to its present occupants. 
National tariff legislation has 
given to Mystic two new in- 
dustries. The first of these is 
the manufacture of velvets by 
Rossie Brothers of Suchteln, 



Germany. This business, start- 
ed in May, 1898, now employs 
about one hundred hands op- 
erating seventy looms. The 
industry, comparatively new 
in the United States, is suc- 
cessful here and the goods of 
this company, have recognized 
excellence in the velvet trade. 
These velvets are blacks and a 
great variety of colors suitable 
for ladies' hats and dresses. 
The second of these new in- 
dustries is the manufacture of 
the finest quality of fancy 
worsted goods. The Mystic 
Manufacturing Company was 
formed in November, 1898. Members of 
this company have mills in Huddersfield, 
England. The finest worsteds in England 
are made in those mills, and the " Mystic 
Worsteds " are of the same quality. It is 
safe to say that the reputation which 
Mystic has to win in these new mercantile 
days may securely rest with the velvets 
and the worsted suitings made by these 
two companies. 

The Mystic Board of Trade, of which 
C. D. Holmes is president and O. D. 
Sherman secretary, has accomplished 
much for the prosperity of the valley : the 
streets have been lighted, the river chan- 
nel has been widened and deepened, and 




PLEASURE STEAMER, SUMMER GIRE. 



MYSTIC. 



415 




dolphins have 
been placed at 
needed points 
on the river, and 
various new 
business enter- 
prises have been 
brought into the 
town. 

Mystic is fav- 
orably located 
for industrial 
growth. Large 
schooners and 
barges bring car- 
goes of lumber 

and coal to its wharves. The Shore Line 
of the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad places Mystic within twenty 
minutes of New London, and four hours 
of New York on the west, and within an 
hour and a half of Providence, and three 
hours of Boston on the east. The Ston- 
ington and the New London steamers 
connect with New York. The valley is 
supplied with Mistuxet water, electric 
lights, and the telephone connections of 
the Southern New England Telephone 
Company. Thus equipped with water, 



THE TIFT HOMESTEAD — OCCUPIED BY DESCENDANTS. 



lights, telephone service, and the best 
transit facilities, Mystic, with all its pic- 
turesque corners and historic associations, 
is a modern town. 

Mystic is beautiful for situation. Walk 
up the west hill to the Mason monument, 
and then a little farther north to the 
Pequot battle ground, and look to the 
north-east, down into the valley and away 
to the hills beyond. Just below is the 
river, a third of a mile in width, lying in 
complete calm ; to the north it narrows 
until it is lost among the trees and hills 
that line its course. 
Across on its east 
bank is the plain of 
Elm Grove Ceme- 
tery. Among the 
elms and the firs 
granite and marble 
mark the dead. It 
is consecrated to 
sorrow, but nature 
and man have 
wrought together to 
give it peace ; on 
two sides the river 
flows, and at the 
east entrance is a 
granite memorial 




RESIDENCE OF DR. J. K. BUCKDYN, JR. 



4 » 6 



MYSTIC. 



T 




BAPTIST CHURCH. 

arch of singular beauty and dignity of pro- 
portion. This cannot be seen from the 
west hill, but those who enter the cemetery 
pass beneath the arch and its inscription, 
"I am the Resurrection and the Life." To 
the northeast, woods and arable land and 
pasture diversify the uplands, and to the 
north the eye is 
arrested by the 
rock summit of 
Lantern Hill ; by 
this name — "Lan- 
thorne Hill" — it 
was granted to 
John Winthrop in 
1652. The name 
was said to come 
from the fact that 
a surface of quartz 
rock near its sum- 
mit reflected light. 
It is a reminis- 
cence of the days 
when Mystic was 
the home port of 
many ships that " riverview 



the visitor is sure to be 
told that Lantern Hill 
is the first land seen by 
the sailor coming in 
from sea. This old land- 
mark is a hill of quartz 
580 feet high. Upon 
its sides and summit, 
quartz crystals appear 
in the stone, and at its 
southern base is a mine 
of partially pulverized 
silex — ninety -five per 
cent, silica, the rest 
soda and talc — white as 
snow. Lantern Hill is 
a favorite resort in sum- 
mer for parties, lunching 
at the base of the hill, 
climbing to the summit 
to see the panoramic view of this very 
rocky corner of Connecticut, and return- 
ing along the wood drives, and through 
the pleasant village of Old Mystic to 
follow the road by the river, coming 
home in the cool of the day. 

After viewing Mystic on the north from 




RESIDENCE OF CHARGES Q. EI.DREDGE. 



MYSTIC. 



4<7 



the old battle ground, one 
should turn south a half 
mile, and from the slope of 
Prospect Hill view the 
Sound, and the sea and the 
line of the coast. To the 
east, five miles away, white 
and shimmering in the after- 
noon light, lies Stonington. 
A few miles farther down to 
the east is Watch Hill set at 
the end of the Sound, a 
natural breakwater against 
the fury of ocean storms. 
Hotels and cottages lie 
massed in the distance over 
"the Hill" fortunate in its 
double outlook towards the rising and the 
setting sun. Yet farther away, on the 
blue horizon, Block Island may be seen — 
the farthest outpost towards the open sea. 
Then the eye turns to the south, following 





RESIDENCE OF DR. G. E. T. WARD. 

long, " the jewel of the Sound." At the 
west end of Fisher's Island are the 
hotels and cottages; and just off the 
north-west shore, where Captain Hardy's 
English fleet lay to blockade New London 
in 1 8 14, the white ships of 
our own navy often ride at 
anchor in the summer. Far 
to the south-west Race Rock 
stands, a pile of gray ma- 
sonry, and yet farther to the 
west are Gull Island and 



A MYSTIC PASTORAL. 

the pale line of sky and 
sea. until it meets the east 
end of Long Island bearing 
the white tower of Montauk 
light-house. It is nineteen 
miles away, over and be- 
yond Fisher's Island which 
only four miles distant lies 
east and west nine miles 




CRABBING ON THE MYSTIC. 



4i8 



MYSTIC. 




RESIDENCE OF CHRISTOPHER MORGAN. 



Plum Island. The coasting vessels sail 
in through the "Race" to find safe harbor 
at New London ; and all the coasting 
trade of the Sound and of the eastern 
approaches to New York, comes within 
the view that spans the entrance between 



Watch Hill and Montauk, the Pillars of 
the Sound. 

When night comes on, the coast-lights 
brighten into view. Far and near they 
mark the horizon with a circle of friendly 
beams, steady lights and flashes, white and 




LOOKING UP THE MYSTIC RIVER. 



HUMAN NA TURE. 



419 



red. Count them 
around from the 
east: Stonington 
Light, Watch Hill 
Light, Latimer's Reef 
Light, Montauk Point 
Light, Ram Island 
Light - ship, North 
Dumpling Light, 
Race Rock Light, 
Little Gull Island 
Light, and just to 
the south — though it 
cannot be seen from 
thehill-Noank Light 
guards the mouth of 
the Mystic River. 

These are the coast fires that light the en- 
trance to Long Island and Fisher's Island 
Sounds. The seaman steers by them with 
implicit trust, and the landsman feels their 




RESIDENCE OF E. B. NOYES. 



steady influence, year in and year out, until 
they seem to him kindred to the elements, 
uniting with moon and stars, and sky and 
sea to make night beautiful. 



HUMAN NATURE. 



BY FRANK L. HAMILTON. 



When fortune smiles, 
And with a quickening pulse. 
Our feet the goal attain, 
O'er struggling efforts pain, 
And stern endeavors, gain 
Success the while, 
Friends all about us stand, 
Eager with outstretched hand, 
To clasp our own. 

When fortune frowns, 
And best endeavor fails, 
To gather aught but leaves, 
Where grim misfortune greaves. 
Fate, on our forehead, weaves 
Thorns for crowns, 
Plodding in vain erstwhile, 
Hungry for hand or smile, 
We are alone. 



THE NEW PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE IN 1778. 



BY AMELIA LEAVITT HILL. 



IN the year 1777 Yale College, through 
the resignation of Dr. Naphtali Dag- 
gett, was left without a President. New 
Haven was seeing troublous times. Fears 
were felt that the town would be attacked 
by the British, as they were constantly 
making descents upon the coast. The 
library and all valuable papers belonging 
to the college had been carried away, and 
the classes were being instructed in differ- 
ent towns in the interior of Connecticut 
where it was felt that there would be safety 
from the enemy's attacks. Under such 
conditions as these a new President was 
desired. All eyes turned toward Ezra 
Stiles,who was considered the most learned 
man of his time, and in that respect 
thought a desirable choice ; but some 
apprehension was held regarding his 
theology, as he was what was called a 
" low Calvinist," and his religious opinions 
somewhat differed from those which pre- 
vailed in Connecticut at the time. He 
was in 1777 preaching in Portsmouth, N. 
H., his church in Newport having been 
broken up by the war. He writes in his 
Journal under Sept. 27, 1777, "This 
evening came to my house the Reverend 
Stephen Johnson of Lime, one of the 
Fellows of Yale College, sent by and in 
the name of the Corporation to wait upon 
me with their choice of me to the Presi- 
dency of that Society. The number of 
undergraduates there last year was 170 or 
180, of which 40 or 50 received their 
degrees the 10th Inst., replaced by but a 
dozen or 15 Freshmen. Since last March 



the classes have been kept at Wethersfield, 
Glastenbury and Farmington — the College 
broken up and scattered thro' the calam- 
ities of the times. It has been a flourish- 
ing academy, having had a greater number 
of students for several years past than any 
College in America, though without funds. 

" Harvard College has had for a num- 
ber of years past 160 or 170 students, un- 
dergraduates, at a time, now only 120. 
Jersey College reported to have 70 or 80. 
Dartmouth 60 or 70. The other colleges 
20 or 30. The times have reduced all." 

Following this entry in the Journal is a 
copy of a formal invitation to Ezra Stiles 
to become President of Yale College. To 
this invitation he replied by letter under 
date of Oct. 2d, asking for a personal 
interview with the Corporation, which was 
granted, and he started for Connecticut 
on the 20th of the month, meeting the 
Corporation on the 5 th of November. 
After the interview we read of his driving 
home through Lebanon and stopping to 
wait upon Governor Trumbull, as he says 
he " held it his duty to pay his respects 
to the first magistrate, and refer himself 
to his wisdom and advice in the affair." 
He also consults with the ministers of 
Boston and the ministers of his own 
(Rhode Island) Association, and finally 
decides to go to New Haven, believing, 
he writes, that the election is " agreeable 
to the Ministry, the General Assembly, 
the State and to God." 

His Journal under date of June 9, 1778, 
gives a picture of a family migration of 



420 



THE NEW PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE IN 1778. 421 



those days. " Portsmouth, June 9, 1778. 
At noon arrived here two carriages from 
New Haven. A caravan and waggon sent 
by the Corporation of Yale College to re- 
move my family ; with a letter from the 
Corporation of the 26th Inst., and 500 
Dollars for Travelling Expenses. The 
Caravan is a neat carriage for four persons. 

June 6th. Busied in preparing for re- 
moval. 

June 7th. Lords Day. I preached 
my farewell sermon. 

June 8th. Putting my things and pre- 
paring for Removal. I freed my Negro 
man Newport about Oct. 30th. Settled 
all my affairs, and myself and seven chil- 
dren set out in two carriages for New 
Haven. One was a Covered waggon which 
carried four beds, three large boxes and 
four children ; the other was a neat, 
genteel Caravan which was suspended 
upon steel springs as a coach, and carried 
myself and three children. 

June 13th. I left Cambridge. Was at 
Boston yesterday. 

June 14th. Kept Sabbath at Shrews- 
bury with Rev. Mr. Skinner. I preached 
for him. 

June 17th. Having rode on the road 
from Boston to Springfield 78 miles we 
turned at Wilbraham southward, and 
passed through Somers and Ellington into 
Windsor, and so through Hartford. At 
East Hartford I waited on Rev. Eliphalet 
Williams, Senior Fellow, who' gave me the 
care of the College. 

June 20th. Arrived in New Haven. 
Expenses of travelling about 230 Doll, 
besides the cost of the carriages. Through 
the good hand of our God we arrived safe 
without any accident. At my accession 



to the Presidency of Vale College 1778, 
the Presidents of the American Congress 
are : 
Harvard Coll., founded 1638, Rev. Dr. 

Langdon. 
Yale Coll., founded 1700, E. S. 
Jersey Coll., N. Y., founded, 1746, Dr. 

Wetherspoon. 
Philad. Coll., founded 1750, Dr. Smith. 
Kings Coll., N. Y., founded 1753, Dr. 

Cooper — fled. 
Dart. Coll., founded 1769, Dr. Wheelock. 
Providence Coll., founded 1763, Mr. 

Manning. 
Wm. & Mary Coll., Mr. Maddison. 

At New Haven I am now entering upon 
a new Scene of life. I have done stated 
Labors of the evangelical Ministry, which 
for some years past have been my great 
Delight. The Professor of Divinity 
preaches in the College Chapel of Lord's 
Day. The College is now empty. The 
students are ordered to assemble here the 
23d Instant. I chose not to preach to- 
day. To show my respect I attended the 
Rev. Mr. Whittlesy's 1 meeting, A. M., and 
heard him preach on ' Godliness with 
Content is great gain.' P. M. I attended 
Rev. Mr. Edward's 2 meeting and heard 
him preach on ' It Is high time to awake.' 
June 2 2d. On viewing the College and 
President's House, and looking up furni- 
ture. 

June 24th. I put the Senior Class into 
President Clap's Ethics. Afterward 
President Edwards on the Will was 
recited. This giving offence was dropt, 
and through the confusion of the times 
the Seniors have recited no ethics for 
several years. When I was an undergradu- 
ate 1742-46 we recited Walleston's 



1. The Rev. Chauncy Whittlesey was pastor of the First Church iu New Haven 
which occupied the site of the present Center Church. 

2. The Mr. Edwards referred to was Jonathan Edwards, the second son of the famous 
clerygman of that name. He was the minister of what was called the " White Haven 
Society." The meeting house built in 1744, called from its color the Blue Meeting 
House, stood on the southeast corner of Elm and Church streets. 



422 THE NEW PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE IN 1778. 



' Religion of nature delineated.' When 
my father was in college (1722) they 
recited ' Mari euchiridion ethicurn.' " 

A month later he says, " I this day 
began to instruct a class in Hebrew and 
the oriental languages. This is not re- 
quired of a President, but I wish to benefit 
them to the utmost of my power. It has 
always been usual to initiate every class a 
little into it but the dispersed state of the 
scholars for two years past has prevented 
this, and other usual studies. 

June 26th. This morning all the Classes 
began recitation. I took upon me the 
Instruction of the Senior Class consisting 
of 38, who recited to me for the first time 
in ' Locke on the human understanding.' 
Commons this day set up, and 82 students 
dined in the Hall, besides Prof. Strong and 
2 tutors. I appointed Williams, Nott 
and Ellis, waiters in the Hall. Yesterday 
I appointed Stebbins, a Freshman, to ring 
the bell for prayers, recitations etc., and 
released him from going of errands for any 
but the Authority of College. 

June 27th. I appointed Stevens, a 
Sophomore, waiter in the Hall. The 
number in Commons requiring four. This 
Evening I began an Exposition in the 
Chapel upon the Savoy Confession adopted 
in 1708 by the Churches in Connecticut. 

June 29th. Much Difficulty in getting 
Furniture and Servants to settle in the 
President's House. Some of the family 
dined here. 

June 30th. The Seniors disputed foren- 
sically on the question whether ' Learning 
increased Happiness.' I dined at home 
for the first time. Busy in committing an 
Oration to memory. 

July 8th. The Corporation met here 
yesterday and this day attended my Inau- 
guration or Instalment into the Presidency 
of Yale College. 

Present : Eliphalet Williams, Presiding 
Fellow, Warham Williams, Stephen John- 



son, Elizur Goodrich, Moses Mather,Sam'l 
Lock wood, Tim'y Pitkin. 

The ceremony was thus : at 10% A.M., 
The College bell rang and a Procession 
was formed and moved from the Chapel 
to the President's House, consisting of the 
four undergraduate classes, and the resi- 
dent Bachelors. Having received the 
President Elect and the Corporation the 
procession advanced and returned to the 
Chapel in the following order, viz. : The 
students, being 116 undergraduates pres- 
ent ; Records, Key and Seal ; The Rev. 
Eliphalet Williams, Senior and Presiding 
Fellow; The Hon. Jabez Hamlin, Esq., 
and President Elect : the Reverend Cor- 
poration ; the Professor of Divinity and 
Mathematics ; the Tutors ; Masters of Art ; 
Ministers and respectable gentlemen. The 
procession having arrived at the Chapel 
the President, pro tempore, took the desk 
and began the Solemnity with Prayer. 
After this he communicated to the assem- 
bly the Election of the Corporation and 
my acceptance, and asked the Hon. Col. 
Hamlin, as one of the Council of the State 
of Connecticut, to administer to me, as 
President Elect, the Oath of allegience to 
the State, in conformity to the Charter. 
Which being done I then read my assent 
to the Confession of Faith in these words : 
'Yale College, July 8, 1778, I, Ezra Stiles, 
being chosen President of Yale College, 
do hereby declare my free assent to the 
Confession of Faith and Rules of Ecclesi- 
astical Discipline agreed upon by the 
Churches in the State of Connecticut, A. 
D., 1708, and established by the laws of 
this government, and do promise to teach 
and instruct the Pupils under my care ac- 
cordingly. Ezra Stiles.' Thereupon Mr. 
Williams delivered from the desk the 
following Oration in Latin, in which he 
committed the College to my Care, In- 
struction and Government, constituting 
me President and Professor of Ecclesiasti- 



AN OLD TIME HERO. 



423 



cal History." Then follows Mr. Williams' 
oration, and this was followed by one also 
in Latin by Ezra Stiles. 

He says, " This ended, I sat down in the 
President's Chair in the Desk and put on 
my Hat and called for the Oration, upon 
which Sir Dana one of the Senior Bache- 
lors assended the Stage and delivered a 
congratulatory oration in Latin. Then I 
arose, took off my Hat and made a Latin 
oration upon the Encyclopedia of Litera- 
ture, in delivering which I was thirty- four 
minutes. The Senior Class then sang an 
anthem being the 1 2 2d Psalm, set to music. 
I closed with a Blessing. After giving a 
general invitation to dinner in the Hall I 
walked out first and with the Corporation 
and Ministers went into the library until 
dinner time. After dinner I retired with 
the Corporation to business. All was 
conducted without any indecency and 



with propriety and academic decorum. 

The undergraduates requested of the 
Corporation permission to illuminate the 
College, and discharge cannon, in the 
evening. We did not directly refuse it, 
but dissuaded them from it. All was 
Peace and Tranquility and evening Prayers 
were attended as usual." 

Again Yale College has a newly elected 
President. The contrast is striking be- 
tween the institution over which President 
Stiles presided and the University which 
now awaits his latest successor. The 
duties of the new President will be far 
different from those described in the 
diary from which we have quoted, and he 
will be installed with ceremony very 
different from the simple forms with which 
his predecessor was welcomed, a little 
more than a hundred years ago. 



AN OLD TIME HERO. 

COMMODORE CHARLES MORRIS, U. S. N. 
1799-1856. 



BY ELLEN D, LARNED. 



I. 



ON January 28, 1856, the officers of 
the Navy and the Marine Corps 
were summoned to pay the last tribute of 
respect to one who for more than half a 
century had been connected with that 
service : who had won distinction in the 
war with Tripoli : gained brighter laurels 
in the war of 181 2 : commanded the 
frigate that carried La Fayette back to 
France in 1825, and filled up the measure 
of his days with other important services. 
Flags were hung at half mast, minute guns 



fired, high Government officials attended 
the funeral, and many glowing tributes 
paid to his character and services. 

Charles Morris was born in West Wood- 
stock, Conn., July 26, 1784. He was the 
son of Capt. Charles Morris, who at the 
age of sixteen had served under La Fayette 
in Rhode Island, and as prisoner had been 
confined in the old Jersey prison-ship. 
Engaging in commercial pursuits after the 
war he was taken prisoner by the Revolu- 
tionists in South America and held captive 



424 



AN OLD TIME HERO. 



a number of years. In the absence of his 
father young Charles grew up with few 
advantages of schooling, but with a natural 
love for books and study, which he im- 
proved as far as possible. 

In 1799 Capt. Morris obtained the 
position of purser of U. S. Ship Baltimore, 
then at Norfolk, Va. and wrote his son to 
join him in view of obtaining an appoint- 
ment as midshipman. The naval service 
was then so weak and so little understood 
by country people that his Connecticut 
friends thought he ran great risk to life 
and morals in accepting this offer, but his 



mm*.- ■ 




COMMODORE CHARGES MORRIS. 

mother's faith in her boy's future carried 
the day. So with a small bundle of 
worldly goods, Charles Morris at less than 
fifteen years of age set out afoot and alone 
to seek his fortune. A two days tramp 
over the hills took him to Providence 
where he found passage in a coasting 
sloop. In the fortnight's rough passage 
he picked up nautical knowledge that was 
of much service. Arriving at Norfolk he 
was assigned to The Baltimore and entered 
upon his duties as midshipman July 1, 
1799. From this he was removed to The 



Congress, Capt. Sever, employed in pro- 
tecting United States commerce in San 
Domingo and other ports. There were 
seven other midshipmen on board, all 
older than Charles, better educated, and 
accustomed to sea life ; but by careful 
study and prompt discharge of every duty 
he held a good position among them and 
won the favor of the crabbed captain. 

A furlough of two years after the close 
of the war with France was mostly im- 
proved in study. In May, 1803, he again 
entered upon service as midshipman of the 
frigate Constitution — the " Old Ironsides" 
of fame and song. This noble ship was 
built in Boston by Capt. Edward Hart 
under Congressional Act of March, 1794. 
The best live oak and cedar were used in 
its construction and Paul Revere furnished 
the copper. It was now detailed as flag- 
ship of the squadron under Commodore 
Preble fitted out to move against Tripoli. 
The Constitution, the Philadelphia, two 
brigs, and two schooners made up the 
squadron that sailed from Boston, Aug. 14, 
for service in the Mediterranean. The 
whole northern coast of Africa was a nest 
of pirates, preying upon United States 
commerce and dragging her citizens and 
seamen into slavery. At Gibralter they 
were met by news that the Emperor of 
Morocco had entered upon the war-path 
and captured the brig Celia. The Com- 
modore hastened to Tangiers to compel a 
renewal of treaty and during his absence 
the Philadelphia under Capt. Bainbridge 
grounded upon a shoal while chasing a 
blockade runner. . Its was quickly seized 
by eager Tripolitans, warped into Tripoli 
harbor and fitted up to fight the Yankees. 
Not only was the squadron greatly crippled 
by this loss, but its own guns were to be 
turned against it. Its recovery was impos- 
sible, but could not it be kept from mis- 
chief? A scheme for its destruction was 
suggested and approve 1 by the Commo- 



AN OLD TIME HERO. 



42, 



dore. To Lieut. Stephen Decatur this 
expedition was entrusted. A "ketch" 
taken from the enemy was dispatched on 
this perilous errand. Combustibles were 
piled on board but slight time was allowed 
for other preparation. It was manned by 
four lieutenants, six midshipmen, and 
some fifty privates and seamen, with a 
Maltese pilot to lead them. Charles 
Morris who by faithful attention to duty 
had won a good reputation, was one of the 
selected midshipmen. They left Syracuse, 
Feb. 3, 1804, and after a week's careful 
coasting reached Tripoli Harbor at night- 
fall. Morris was detailed to accompany 
the pilot upon a reconnoissance and the 
boisterous night and high surf compelled 
him to report against attempting seizure 
to the disgust of the officers who were 
"spoiling for a fight," weary of confine- 
ment in the small vessel, and quite dis- 
posed to charge our young "middie" with 
cowardice. But before morning the wind 
had become a gale and for several days 
they were obliged to keep in hiding in 
most uncomfortable quarters, their small 
ship filled with vermin and provision 
scanty and most offensive. 

But on Feb. 16th conditions were favor- 
able save that a vessel detailed to assist 
them had not arrived. "The fewer the 
number, the greater the honor," said 
Decatur, and after receiving minute in- 
structions and the watchword, " Philadel- 
phia," the little "Intrepid" stole into the 
harbor. By the light of a young moon 
they could distinguish objects and then 
their lost Philadelphia came into view. A 
hail from the watch was answered by the 
Moorish pilot with the request to attach 
his vessel to the frigate, having had the 
misfortune to lose their anchor in the gale. 
This was a moment of intense anxiety. A 
veering wind carried the Intrepid in a 
contrary direction, but with instant deft- 
ness ropes from the boats were made fast 



to the fiigate and she was brought within 
boarding distance. The cry of " Ameri- 
cans " rang through the ship as the order 
to "board" was given. Of three ready 
to leap on deck one midshipman became 
entangled in his armor ; Decatur sprang 
at the rail above, but young Morris made 
a sure leap and gained the first foot-hold. 
In an instant the others were with him and 
those who had lain hidden below were 
scrambling through the ports and over 
the rails into the fight. The surprise had 
been complete, the men on board made no 
show of resistance. A few were killed, 
one was made prisoner, most of them 
jumped over board and escaped to shore. 
Previous orders received for firing the 
ship were immediately carried out. Each 
lieutenant with a midshipman and speci- 
fied men received a share of the prepared 
combustibles and distributed them in des- 
ignated sections. To Midshipman Morris 
the cockpit was assigned and an order 
to set fire had been given before his share 
had arrived. Hastily emptying the sacks 
of dry pine and shavings saturated with 
turpentine he applied the fire and with his 
men scrambling up to the gun-deck threw 
down upon the kindling flames demijohns 
of spirits of turpentine. So rapidly the 
fire spread through the frigate that it 
was with difficulty they made their escape, 
gaining the Intrepid at the last moment. 
The brave Decatur remained on board 
till all were safe, " and the bow of the ketch 
had already swung off from the ship when 
he joined us by leaping into the rigging." 
In less than twenty minutes the whole 
thing had been accomplished and the 
triumphant party was speeding back 
through the harbor. Their cheers were 
answered by a general discharge of artil- 
lery. Turkish cannon roared from gun- 
boats, corsairs, and batteries but as in the 
late fire upon Hobson their aim was in- 
effective. Under fire of nearly an hundred. 



426 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



pieces but one shot hit and that through 
the topgallant sail. They were in greater 
danger from the guns of the burning ship 
discharged as they became heated. 

The report of the first brilliant achieve- 
ment of the American Navy was received 
with great enthusiasm and added much to 
its reputation in its day of infancy and 
weakness. Great credit was justly given to 
Commodore Preble and Lieut. Decatur 
but the young midshipman whose foot 



first touched the Philadelphia deck won 
the public heart. While admitting in 
later years that the reputation thus gained 
had a beneficial influence upon his career 
with characteristic modesty and candor 
he disclaimed any particular merit for it, 
and insisted that he deserved more credit 
for his faithful report against the prema- 
ture attempt to enter the Tripoli harbor 
than for an accidental precedence that 
had cost him not half the effort. 



LIST OF BURIALS, CENTER CHURCH BURYING 
GROUND, HARTFORD. 



ANNOTATED BY MARY K. TALCOTT. 



1797. 

Jan. 



15 

15 

Feb. 8 



14 



Mar. 



26 

27 

3 



Ingham Clark, Burial charged 
the Town. 

Mary Ann Payne [daughter of 
Capt. Benjamin and Rebecca 
(Knowles) Payne, bapt. Jan. 
5, 1761], aged 36 years. 

Elisha Burr, aged 80 years. 

Abraham Pratt, aged 25 years. 

Child of Asa Allen [Richard], 
aged 1 year. 

Caleb Bull [son of Caleb and 
Martha (Cadwell) Bull, born 
July 16, 1746], aged 51 years. 

Col. Joseph Bull [son of Deacon 
Daniel Bull], aged 60 years. 

Frederick Bull [Son of Caleb and 
Martha (Cadwell) Bull, born 
March n, 1753], aged 44 years. 

Infant child of Henry Butler. 

Amariah Brigham, aged 28 years. 

[Col.] Samuel Talcott [son of 
Gov. Joseph and Eunice (How- 
ell) (Wakeman) Talcott, bapt. 
March 28, 1711], aged 86 years. 

Son of Samuel Wyllys, Esq.* 
[SamuelHobart],aged 12 years. 

Daughter of Eli Warner aged 23 
years. 



9 

11 
20 

23 



23 
30 



April 2 



19 



28 

May 12 
21 

23 

24 



Infant Child of George Barret. 
Infant Child of Elias Morgan. 
Infant Child of Samuel Benton. 
Infant Child of Amasa Jones. 
Mrs. Lydia Shepard [Lydia 

Phelps, widow of Timothy 

Shepard], aged 77 years. 
Infant Child of Jeremiah Barret. 
Mrs. Little, Burial charged the 

Town, aged 38 years. 
Melser Fowler, Burial charged 

Aaron Bradley, aged 20 years. 
Child of Daniel Dwight, aged 1 

year. 
Infant Child of Ezekiel Webster, 

aged 3 years. 
The wife of Josiah Bigelow 

[Sally], aged 42 years. 
[Rev.] Elnathan (Elhanan) 

Winchester, [pastor of the 

Universalist Church], aged 46 

years. 
Mrs. Brunson, burial charged 

the Town, aged 38 years. 
Infant Child of John Johnson. 
Child of Asaph Hall, aged 1 year. 
Infant Child of Elijah Brewer. 
Jabez Hobert, aged 33 years. 



BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 427 



June 10 Richard Doaue was hanged, 
burial charged the State of 
Connecticut. [On Saturday, 
the 10th inst., the sentence of 
death was executed in this 
town upon Richard Doane, a 
native of Ireland, for the mur- 
der of Daniel Mclver, on the 
4th of July, A. D., 1796 — Con- 
necticut Courant, June 12, 1797]. 
Hannah Jones, aged 20 years. 
Child of William Moore, aged 1 

year. 
Jesse Marsh [Son of Ensign 
Daniel and Irene (Bigelow) 
Marsh], aged 61 years. 

July 11 Nathaniel Marsh, aged 23 years. 

24 Sarah Nepton, aged 29 years. 

25 Cato Currie, aged 60 years. 
Aug. 1 Capt. Samuel Marsh's Wife 

[Catherine, daughter of John 
Michael and Margaret (Beau- 
champ), Chenevard], aged 66 
years. 
10 Child of Theodore Bunce, aged 2 
years. 

Infant Child of Benjamin Crane. 

John Roberts, apprentice to L. 
Kennedy [drowned in the 
Connecticut River], aged 17 
years. 

Mrs. Hall, burial charged Dr. 
Kingsbury (Kingsley), aged 
71 years. 

Child of Moses Goodwin, aged 1 
year. 

Capt. Thomas Hopkins [son of 
Thomas and Mary (Beckley) 
Hopkins, born, Aug. 27, 1725], 
aged 73 years. 
Oct. 9 Hannah Day [daughter of Samuel 
and Hannah (Ashley) Day], 
aged 46 years. 
19 John Larkam, aged 73 years. 

23 Child of Anna Peters, aged 7 

months. 
Nov. 1 Child of Gideon Manly, aged 1 
year. 
3 Child of James H. Wells, aged 18 

months. 
12 John McAlpin, aged 62 years. 
22 Child of Thomas Ensign, aged 2 
years. 

24 Child of Gideon Manly [infant]. 



17 
Sept. 4 



U 



Sept. 28 



Dec. 


16 




26 


1798 


Jan. 


5 




12 




12 




14 



19 

Feb. 12 

12 
16 



24 Child of Sybel Lewis, aged 4 
years. 

25 Mary Ledyard [widow of John 
Ledyard and dau. of John and 
Mary (Stanley) Austin], aged 
82 years. 

Daughter of Joseph Utley, 2d, 

aged 7 years. 
Hezekiah May, aged 69 years. 

Samuel Smith, aged 22 years. 
Benjamin Townsend, aged 62 

years. 
Phebe Brown, aged 25 years. 
Two infant children of Tabor 

Bolles. 
Abigail Kilbourn [widow of 

Capt. Nathaniel Kilbourn], 

aged 71 years. 
Child of Stephen Skinner 

[Sally, aged 2 weeks]. 
Child of Willard Smith [infant]. 
Benjamin Spencer, aged 44 years. 
March 8 The Wife of Moses Ensign 

[Sally], aged 60 years. 

17 John Billings, aged 31 years. 

22 John Burbridge's son [John], 

aged 13 years. 
25 Child of John Chenevard, Jr., 
[Mary Juliana], aged 8 months. 
28 Temperance Moore [widow], 
aged 54 years. 
April 4 Eleazer Swetland, aged 32 years. 
9 Rebecca Burket, aged 34 years. 

10 The Wife of James Turner, aged 

19 years. 
20 Infant Child of John Porter, the 
Cabinet Maker. 
May 7 Sarah Farnsworth, aged 67 years. 
31 The Wife of John Wells, aged 63 
years. 
June 14 Infant Child of Dr. Kingsley. 

18 Child of Isaac Watson, aged 1 

year. 
22 Child of Samuel Day, 2d, aged 18 
months. 
July 1 Hugh Ledlay [Capt. Hugh Ded- 
lie of Norwich and Mrs. Mary 
Nevins of Hartford were mar- 
ried Feb. 4, 1770. (First Church 
record)], aged 78 years. 

11 Wife of Ezra Corning, aged 49 

years. 
9 Martha Kilbourne [daughter of 



428 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



Capt Samuel and Sarah 
(Bunce) Kilborne, born in 
1754], aged 45 years. 
11 Mrs. Helena Breck [Helena 
daughter of Gov. Joseph and 
Eunice (Howell) Talcott, born 
March 20, 1720, widow 1st of 
Rev. Edward Dorr, 2d of Rev. 
Robert Breck of Springfield], 
aged 78 years. 
24 Hannah Swetland. 
Aug. 1 Child of James Steele, aged 1 
year. 

2 [Wife of] Whiting Seymour 

[Lovisa, dau. of Eli Warner, 
died July 31, 1798, aged 39, 
according to tombstone], aged 
35 years. 

3 Mrs. Sarah Bull [widow], aged 

77 years. 

10 The Wife of Justin Lyman, aged 

34 years. 

Jonathan Hastings [son of Lieut. 
JosiahHastings of Chesterfield, 
N. H. ], aged 29 years. 

Daughter of Widow Mary Bar- 
nard [Martha], aged 15 years. 

Mary Watrous, aged 33 years. 

Wife of Cotton Murray [Cotton 
Murray came here from New 
Hampshire as early as 1777. 
(Christ Church Annals. C. J. 
Hoadly)], aged 55 years. 
22 Child of Philip Smith, aged 1 
year. 

29 Child of Samuel (Lemuel)? 

Adams [Frederick], aged 1 
year. 

30 Child of Elisha Colt [Sally], 

aged 9 months. 
Sept. 2 Child of Samuel Thompson 
[Delia], aged 6 years. 

4 Son of Abel Flynt [Henry Lang- 

don. ] 
8 Child of David Wadsworth, aged 
3 months. 

1 1 Infant Child of EbeneserWarner. 
2 Infant Child of John Ellsworth. 

13 Widow Sarah Filley [Tiley]. 

16 The Wife of Timo. Bunce [Rachel 
Turner], aged 54 years. 

17 Child of Asariah Hancock, aged 
1 year. 

20 Mary Cornwell, aged 34 years. 



13 



Oct. 



21 Child of Normand Smith, aged 1 
year. 
Nov. 13 William Olcott [son of Joseph 
and Eunice (Collyer; Olcott, 
baptised Nov. 3, 1751], aged 
53 years. 
15 Elizabeth Dickinson, aged 77 

years. 
18 Joseph Steinart's son, aged 7 
years. 
Dec. 2 John Brace, aged 56 years. 
5 John Cable, aged 58 years. 

11 WilliamAndrus,Jr.,aged35 years. 

12 The Mother of Daniel Jones 

[Hope, widow of Amasa Jones 
of Colchester, dau. of Epaph- 
ras and Hope (Phillips) Loid, 
born Dec. 1, 1736], aged 62 
years. 
27 Child of Mrs. Mercer, aged 1 
year. 



1799 

Jan'y 2 



15 
Feb. 17 

25 



25 

25 
March 9 



April 7 
17 



Samuel Wadsworth [born Oct. 
25, 1716, son of Sergt. Jonathan 
and Hepsibah (Marsh) Wads- 
worth], aged 82 years. 

Wife of John Van Orden (Van 
Norden) [Anna dau. of Eben- 
ezer and Mary(Holtom) Catlin 
born Aug. 3, 1758], aged 40 
years. 

Infant Child of John Carter. 

The Wife of Jesse Hopkins, aged 
25 years. 

Infant child of [Joseph] Whiting 
Seymour [Mary Anna, aged 
7 months]. 

Child of Salmon Burr, aged 6 
months. 

Infant Child of Geo. Goodwin. 

The Wife of John Caldwell 
[Margaret, dau. of Capt. Heze- 
kiah and Jennett (Evans) 
Collier], aged 40 years 

Adonijah Brainard,aged 42 years. 

Deliverance Seymour [widow of 
Jared Seymour, bapt. Feb. 28, 
1 73 1, dau. of John and Mary 
(Turner) Skinner], aged 68 
years. 

The Wife of Alfred James 
[Polly], aged 22 years. 

Infant Child of Joshua Leffing- 
well. 
(To be Continued. 



OL' NANCE. 



BY FRED J. EATON. 




FT ol' mare ain't vv'at she used t' be, in th' days uv th' 

Cornville Fair, 
When speed 'nd grit wuz th' things thet won, 'nd th' trottin' 

wuz straight 'n' square ; 
F'r thar wuzn't no hoss in th' country 'round ez could set 

her a foot behind — 
Strong 'n' cordy 'n' lithe V true — uv th' good old-fashioned 

kind. 

Don't look like she ever won a race — decrepit 'n' blind 'n' lame — 

But she 'members th' time in her younger days when she hustled 'em, all th' same ; 

'Nd she needed no urgin' t' send 'er along t' th' head uv th' list, 'n' so 

I always steadied th' faithful gal with a "Wh-o-a, Nance, wh-o-a." 

I entered her once at th' Cornville track 'gainst trotters uv pedigree smart, 
Each drawin' a light, little two-wheeled gig, while Nance pulled th' ol' farm-cart ; 
'Nd she looked about on her rivals gay, all rigged in th' latest style, 
'Nd I fancied I seen in her han'some face a kind uv sarcastic smile. 

But th' jockeys sneered at th' green young mare, who had never betrayed her trust, 
'Nd boastingly promised us more'n our share uv th' plentiful Cornville dust ; 
But I said not a word till th' start it came, 'nd th' starter had yelled out " Go ! " 
Then I settled me back on th' farm-cart seat with a " Wh-o-a, Nance, wh-o-a." 

01' Nance she flew from th' startin' post, in th' midst uv her rivals gay, 

'Nd she straightened her out till it fairly seemed ez if on th' track she lay ; 

'Nd foot b' foot she wuz leavin' 'em all, ez th' cart swung to 'n' fro, 

'Nd them jockeys wuz gittin' thet Cornville dust, with a " Wh-o-a, Nance, wh-o-a." 

At th' "half " she wuz fairly a-rippin 7 a groove in th' track, ez she plowed it through ! 
'Nd th' rumble-te-bang uv th' ol' farm-cart wuz a sound t' them jockeys new ; 
'Nd I heerd 'em a-urgin' along thar pets with a " Hi-thar ! Git-thar ! Go ! " 
Ez I braced me back on th' tightened lines with a " Wh-o-a, Nance, wh-o-a." 

01' Nance she scooted beneath th' wire amid th' shouts uv all, 

'Nd they yelled 'n' danced in th' ol' grand-stand till I thought th' thing 'u'd fall ; 

So I collared th' stakes in th' ol' gal's name, 'n' jest ez I turned to go, 

A gentleman bid me a thousand f'r Nance, but I quietly answered " No." 

No, Nance she ain't w'at she used t' be — but look at her raise them ears ! 
I'll bet y' dollars t' doughnuts, now, thet she knows each word she hears. 
'Nd look at her pawin' th' ol' stall floor ! she 'members thet ol'-time "go," 
'Nd is hankerin' still f'r th' same ol' sport — but " Wh-o-a, Nance, wh-o-a." 
429 
30 



MILFORD CEMETERY. 



BY M. LOUISE GREENE. 



S the express, bound for 
New York, nears Milford, 
&& \\ ;; or the local slows down 
for that station, on the 
right of the track, an old 
burying-ground unrolls it- 
self, heavily shaded, and sprinkled freely 
with the low slabs of slate and sandstone 
which indicate the resting place of early 
generations. At the western boundary 
not far from the gateway, a single shaft of 
Portland freestone rises in solitary state - 
liness. On its sculptured column are the 
arms of Connecticut, and on the broad 
square base below the Qui transtulit sus- 
tinet, Milford town thus records the name 
and residence of forty-six Revolutionary 
heroes. 

IN HONOR OF 

<( Forty-six American Soldiers who 
sacrificed their lives in struggling for the 
Independence of their county this Monu- 
ment was erected in 1852, by the joint 
liberality of the General Assembly, the 
people of Milford, and other contributing 
friends. 

Two hundred American Soldiers, in a 
destitute, sickly and dying condition, were 
brought from a British Prison Ship, then 
lying near New York, and suddenly cast 
upon our shore from a British cartel-ship, 
on the first of January, 1777. 

The inhabitants of Milford made the 
most charitable efforts for the relief of the 

430 



strangers, yet notwithstanding all their 
kind ministrations, in one month these 
forty-six died, and were buried in one com- 
mon grave. 

Their names and residences are on this 
monument. Who shall say that Republics 
are ungrateful." 

The names are chiselled on the north 
and west face of the pediment. 

Beginning near the shaft, and trending 
northward an arched and sombre path of 
ever greens binds the old and new, for in 
the farthest distance dots of reflected 
sunlight suggest the modern cemetery 
beyond. 

Of the five hundred and odd stones in 
this ancient God's-acre, many are so 
"dented by the tooth of Time and razure 
of oblivion" as to be no longer decipher- 
able. Ten years ago the late Mr. Nathan 
G. Pond issued a pamphlet entitled 
Inscriptions on tombsto?ies in Milford, 
Connecticut, in which he included some 
four hundred and seventy-nine stones. 
The oldest headstone now standing 
records that 

Here lieth 

the body of 

William Roberts 

who departed this 

Life in the 

72 nd year of his age 

August 6, 1689. 



MILFORD CEMETERY. 



43' 



The next in point of time is one of 
M^. CLEMANT 

SMITH 

DIED SEPTE 

MBER THE 

20, 1695 

IN THE [ .] 6 

YEAR [ . . ] 

HER [..-.] 

The much worn stone represented in 

the cut is pre- 



sumably that Of HEADSTONE TO MILES MERWIN. 

Miles Merwin, 
tanner, who came 
in 1645 as one °f 
the second body 
of Milford set- 
tlers, and died 
April 25, 1697. 
His wife Sarah is 
known to have 
died on the fifth 
of the following 
March, but her 
grave has not 
been identified. 

This burying- 
ground was first 
opened in 1675. 
Previous to that 
year people were 
buried in Mr. 
Prudden's home 
lot, gathered 
there about their 
first faithful pas- 
tor, who himself 
was laid to rest 
at the east end 

of his garden in 1656. It lay open to 
the common, then including land on 
both sides of Mill river as far as the 
present North street, until 1756, when in 
obedience to the town's commands, a 
rough stone fence, which had been ordered 
in 1 75 1, was completed. This area was 
added to at many different times and now 



includes in both the old and new cemetery, 
more ground than is usual for a town the 
size of Milford. 

The stones of the older cemetery group 
themselves architecturally into two classes 
— the familiar head and foot stones and 
the tables or large slabs supported by 
four or five short columns which are 
either plain or sculptured after the Ionic 
or Doric order. These col- 
umns vary from a foot and a 
half to two feet and a' half in 
height. Of this latter style 
the grave of Governor Law, 
1750, is a good example; 




THROUGH THE EVERGREENS. 



that of Governor Treat, 1710, is a modi- 
fied form resembling more the stone sar- 
cophagi of older countries. As to material, 
the earliest is that of sand-stone for the 
common folk and imported English 
slate for those who could afford the luxury. 
These English stones have far outlasted 
the brittle, granular sandstone or the softer 



432 



MILFORD CEMETER 



native slate used later. One of the best 
preserved of these imported stones is that 
of Mrs. Nesbett, 1697, wife of Mungo 
Nesbett, the rich Milford merchant who 
traded to New York. 

The decorative element first sought 
expression in the gruesome warning of 
skull or death's head, or in the seraphic 
smile of cherubs chilled with awe. This 
decoration is found mostly in the eight- 
eenth century, while the early third of 
our own abounds in urns and weeping- 
willows as a sort of compromise during 
the transitional period when men hesitated 



TO MRS. NESBETT. 

to leave the gloomy deadening thoughts 
of inevitable death and coming judgment 
for the more profitable contemplation of 
lives well lived or the inspiring hope of 
" yet another world to right all error and 
mischance." Good examples of this willow 
decoration are noticed near the Treat 
corner at which the earlier and the later 
cemeteries join. 

Sentiment crops out as early as 1750 
but with the striking exception of the 
Gillit family it is free from panegyric, is 
rare, and confines itself, until well into the 
eighties, to short ejaculatory sentences 
in addition to the concise data of the 



earlier stones. " Memento Mori," a brief 
line of scripture or, 

' ' Time how short, 
Eternity how long!" 
furnishes the range of selection. 
Mrs. Gillit's tombstone has the following : 
Here lyes the body of Mrs. 
Phebe Gillit wife to Mr. 
William Gillit Jun who died 
Feb ye 10 AD. 1756 AB 29. 
Her dying word unto her husband are 
Refrain your Passions, why so much dis- 

pare 
Its the will of God I hope its for the best 
For you — for me and for my motherless 
To whom adue — to God & you 
I now commit thare care. 

Pattern of Pationts to the end of Life 

Now ded she speak to every liveing wife 

Peti such juells shovld be laid in dust 

Men are unwarthy and the Lord is just. 

In the closing quarter of the eighteenth 

century home-made poetry appears, 

Occasionally relief therefrom is afforded 

by a line from Pope or Young, or by a 

Latin epitaph as in the case of Rev, 

Samuel Whittlesey ; or by a eulogistic 

record, simple if sometimes fulsome, of 

some popular pastor, soldier or prominent 

civilian. Sometimes the "panegyric of 

a tombstone" depicts the character of the 

deceased as in, 

Be ye also ready 
Entombed is here deposited the dear 

remains of Mrs. Martha DeWitt 

the amiable consort of Mr. Ab V. H, 

DeWitt & daughter of Capt Charles 

Pond, who in sure & certain hope of 

the resurrection, closed her eyes upon a 

vain transitory world Sept. 30, 1790 aged 20.. 

She was Charitable, Humane, Benevolent 

& of a 

truly sympathetic Disposition 
Could real virtues have added to the num~ 

ber of her 
months Patty had yet been living, her Hus- 
band 
her Parents and her friends had yet been 

happy but A- 
las, she languished, she sickened & she died 
Heaven is the reward of Vertue. 



MIL FORD CEMETERY. 



433 



She's gone and I shall see that face no 

more 
But pine in absence and till death adore 
When with cold dew my fainting eyebrows 

hung 
My eyeballs darken, with my faltering 

tongue 
Her name shall tremble with a feeble 

moan 
And love with fate-divide my dying groan. 

Milford grave-stones are all but free 
from [those singular epitaphs which pro- 
voke the smile and draw the tear, and of 
these I give but two, the first for a child 
of three years, the second for Miss Mary 
Fowler, aged twenty-four. 

Here lyes the body, 
of Elihu the son of 
Jonathan Fowler who 
departed this Life Oct 9 
AD. 1784, aged 3 years 
& 9 months. 
His Life a Span-the Mournful toil 
Declares the exit of His Soul 
Grim death is come 
His life is called 
To take its flight 
The means a Scald. 
Ye who are young come learn your end 
By deep repentance make Christ your 
friend. 

Sacred to the memory 
of Miss Mary Fowler 
daughter to Mr Wil 
Ham & Mrs. Eunice 

Fowler who died 

Feb 1 AD 1792 in the 

24 year of her age. 



Molly the pleasant in her day 
Was suddenly seized and feut away 
How foon fhes ripe, How foon fhes rotten 
Sent to her grave & soon forgotten. 

As early as 1838 Mr. Lambert, the 
historian of Milford, pleaded that these 
old stones should be scraped of the moss 
incrusting them and saved from oblivion. 
Also that the victim-; of the prison ship 
should be honored. In 1858 the monu- 
ment to the latter was erected at a cost of 
$600, and later many of the stones were 
scraped and broken inscriptions replaced 
or pieced. In both the-old and the new 
ground commendable order and trimness 
show the care with which Milford honors 
her dead. Some noticeable monuments, 
some fine specimens of stone work are 
prominent in the modern section. It 
would seem invidious for a stranger to 
enumerate examples, yet among them a 
certain few belong equally to the visiting 
public. The receiving vault, a gem of its 
kind, is of special note at the western en- 
trance. A piece of statuary, recently 
erected attracts attention by the remark- 
able beauty of the Carara marble and the 
exquisite finish of detail. In the shadow 
of the Lawrence monument, the grave of 
Nathan G. Pond, genealogist and anti- 
quarian, will be found by his many friends 
and by the host of those who knew him 
from afar. 

( To be Continued.) 




THE PEARL STREET ECCLESIASTICAL SOCIETY. 



THE approaching completion of the 
new church edifice now being erected 
by the Pearl Street Ecclesiastical Society 
of Hartford at the corner of Woodland 
street and Farmington avenue, and the 
recent sale of the present church building, 



viously existing society, and was under- 
taken, January 17, 185 1, with the full ap- 
proval of the then existing societies of the 
city. The corner-stone of the building was 
laid the following August, a considerable 
part of the $40,000 needed for its erection 




THE PEARI, STREET CHURCH. 

were made the occasion of an historical 
sermon by pastor Love on the last Sunday 
of June. The organization of the church 
and society differed so widely from what 
usually occurs as to be worthy of remark. 
The formation of the society was not the 
result of any quarrel or division of a pre- 
434 



THE FARMINGTON AVENUE EDIFICE. 



having been secured. The society's com- 
mittee proceeded to take the necessary 
steps towards the formation of a church ; 
but the church's organization was not 
perfected until October 11, 1852, a few 
weeks before the completion of the build- 
ing. The new church consisted of 91 
members — 46 men and 45 women — of 
whom only four now remain. Ten of 
these members came from outside of the 
city, the others by letters of dismissal 
and recommendation from four of the 
city's churches. Four pastors have served 
the church, Rev. Elias R. Beadle, until 
1863; Rev. Jonathan Jenkins from 1864 
to 1866: followed by Rev. William L. 
Gage, 1869 to 1884 ; who was succeeded 
the year following by Rev. W. DeLoss 
Love. The church has ever been pros- 
perous, its total membership since organi- 
zation amounting to 1,395 persons. But 
with the city's growth and rapid extension 
to the westward the present building was 
found to be poorly located for the society's 
needs, and regretfully it has been sold. 
Soon the stones which form a stately and 
harmonious whole will be taken one from 
another, and the best proportioned spire 
in the city which has raised its 212 feet 
of beauty into the air will be no more. 




REV. DR. BEADLE AND HIS CLASS OF YOUNG MEN. 



435 




GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



ANSWERS. 

46. (a) Anna, b. Oct. 2, 1760, m. 
Stephen Smith, Rupert, Vt. Had 
children : one married David Sheldon ; 
Sylvester m. Miss Harvon ; Anna was 
the fifth child ; her oldest sister married 
Calvin Smith (brother Stephen) resided 
Palatue, N. Y. 

John (John, John, Samuel, Thomas,) 
b. Nov. 27, 1 73 1, m. (by John Prout, 
J. P.) Feb. 2, 1748-9, Sarah Turner. 
He died July 22, 1808, resided in Con- 
necticut and New York. 
John (John, Samuel, Thomas,) b. July 
7, 1693, New Haven ; m. Jan. 28, 
1 71 1-2, Esther Clark, b. Jan. 2, 1692. 
Resided New Haven, Conn. She died 

1747- 

Sergent John had eight children. He 
was killed in "King Georges War" 
about 1743-46. 

John (Samuel, Thomas,) b. Jan. 28, 
1672 ; m. Nov. 10, 1692, Sarah, dau. 
Sergeant John Cooper, died about 1741- 
44. Resided New Haven. Captain 
John was first steward Yale College, he 
was first selectman and deacon of the 
First Church. 
436 



Samuel (Thomas), b. Aug. 7, 1643 ; m - 
Oct. 26, 1665, Martha Bradley. He 
died Jan. 10, 1693. Children resided 
New Haven, Wallingford, New Haven. 
Thomas, b. about 161 2 ; m. Johanna 
about 1610; she died 13, 1668; he 
died May 7, 1685 ; resided Hartford 
and New Haven, Conn. He first 
appears in Hartford, went in Pequot 
War with Mason ; was made Captain in 
New Haven, 1675. He and his wife 
are buried under the First Church in 
New Haven ; stones are in the New 
Haven cemetery. He and she were 
born in England. 

— Taken from Munson Record. 
25 {d.) and 57. Rutty. Jonah Rutty and 
Sarah Kelsey were m. 30 Dec, 1767* 
See Killingworth land records. 
"Asa the son of Jonah and Sarah Rutty 
was b. Sept. 25, 1768 ; Ezra b. Dec. 23, 
17.71." Ibid. vol. 2, p. 87. 
Asa Rutty m. Elizabeth Russell. Asa 
Rutty d. 24 Oct., 1829, ae. 61. Eliza- 
beth, his wife, d. 25 Aug. 1847, ae. 77. 
Headstone inscriptions,Tylerville,Conn. 
Jonah Rutty was one of the plaintiffs in 
the case of Rutty V. Tyler, 3 Day's 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



437 



Reports 470. (1809.) 

A deed is recorded in Haddam Land 

Records, Vol. 14, p. 167, given by 

Harvey Towner and his wife Polly 

Towner. 

QUERIES. 

68. (a) Holmes — Mack(or MacAdam), 
resided in Patterson, N. J., m. Jennie 
Riley, and had : Maggie, m. Charles 
Stagg. Who were parents of Mack? 
{b) Messenger — Nicholas, d. abt. 
1888; prob. from New Jersey; re- 
sided Goshen, Orange Co., N. V., m. 
Hannah Miller, and had : Andrew J., 
Jenny, John J., George, Charles, and 
Samuel. Who were parents and grand- 
parents of Nicholas Messenger and 
Hannah Butler? 

C. M. 

69. Wagenseil. — Christopher, settled 
Hanover Twp., Phila. Co., now Mont- 
gomery Co., Penn., near Pennsburg, 
and had : I. Ann Mary, m. John 
Derr. II. Elizabeth Catharine, m, 
David Haag. III. John, who had : 
1. Susanna, m. Conrad Swinehart. 2. 
Anna Maria, m. Benjamin Royer. 3. 
Maria Margaret, m. Mathias Walter. 
The ancestors and descendants are de- 
sired of the Haag, Derr, Swinehart, 
Royer and Walter families. 

G. W. W. 

70. Perry. — Nathaniel of Kent, Ct., m. 
Polly Toucey (sister of Isaac Toucey, 
at one time Sec'y of the Navy), and 
had Ann Perry, m. Rev. Riverius 
Camp, D. D., for 29 yrs. Rector of 
Trinity Church, Brooklyn, Ct. Isaac 
Toucey was Gov. of Conn., 1846-7. 
It is desired to trace the Perry and 
Toucey ancestry. G. I. B. 

71. Lay. — Abigail, b. Mch. 6, 1773, 
Lyme, Conn., m. Jonathan, b. Aug. 
31, 1765, New London, son of Wm. 
Douglas. Who were parents of Abi- 
gail? C. C. 



72. Smith. — Thomas, was voted land at 
the second town meeting in Suffield in 
1682. He m. 1st Mch. 18, 1684-5, 
Joanna Barber; she d. June 25, 1688, 
leaving a son John Thomas, m. 2nd 
Mary, dau. Rev. John Younglove. In 
published records of Suffield the com- 
piler, Hezekiah S. Sheldon, says Thomas 
S. was a weaver from Ipswich, Mass. 
When was Thomas born, and what 
were his parents' names? J. A. S. 

73. White. — Henry, my gt. gt. gr. father 
was born at Groton, Conn. : when a 
young man went to Colebrook, Conn., 
where he m. and had seven or eight 
sons but I have only the names of six 
—Lemuel, Stephen, Henry, Jr., Pere- 
grine, Anthony, Ezra; and two daus. 
Sally Ann and Olive. Who were parents 
of Henry? S. A. W. 

74. Russell. — Ebenezer, son of John (d. 
1825-1840) of Branford; brother of 
Orphana who m. Giles Blague of Say- 
brook. Whom did Ebenezer marry? 

" E. P. B. 

75. Coleman. — Gershom, of Coventry 
abt. 1745, m. Mercy Allis and had : 1. 
Sarah. 2. Miriam, m. Solomon Lord. 
3. Gershom. 4. Nathaniel. 5. 
Timothy. 6. Phineas. Desired, ad- 
dresses of descendants. P. H. M. 

76. Dorrance. — John, b. 1820 d. 1885 ; 
son of Benjamin Brewster, b. 1791, d. 
1828; son of Capt. David (enlisted 
Voluntown, Conn.; moved 1790, with 
family to Sullivan Co., N. Y.) b. pre- 
sumably 1751, d. 1822 : Capt. in Rev. 
His wife, my gt. gr. mother was, I am 
told, a lineal descendant from Elder 
Wm. 1 Brewster, Jonathan 2 , Jonathan 3 , 
Benjamin 4 , b. 1670. According to this 
date, I think there must have been one 
between this Benjamin and my gt. gr. 
mother whose name was Ann or Anna. 
Was her name Brewster or Hurburt? 
And name of the one between, if there 



438 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



was such. Dorrance family lived in 
Windham Co.. Conn. L. R. D. A. 

77. Hickson. — Sarah, m. March 19,1719, 
Samuel Jones of Wallingford. Was she 
dau. of Robert Hickson who m. Sept. 

26, 1 7 19, Sarah Brewster of Eastham, 
Mass? Savage says perhaps dau. of 
John of Portsmouth. E. J. L. 

78. Phippeney. — David, d. 181 5, in 
Hartford, Conn., aet. 53. It is said he 
was born in New Milford. What was 
his father's name? E. L. P. 

79. (a) Champlin. — Martha, b. June 

27, 1 750, Westerly, R. I., dau. of Samuel 
and Hannah (Gardiner) Champlin, 
was first wife of Nicholas, b. May 20, 
1749, Kingston, R. I. son of Ezekiel 
Gardiner. Ancestry, revolutionary and 
colonial services of ancestors desired. 
(b) Cross, Joseph, son of Samuel, gr. 
son of Joseph, b. May 19, 1875, 
Charleston, R. I. First wife Dorcas, 
dau. Johathan Reynolds of So. Kings- 
ton, R. I. War record and ancestry 
wanted. 

(<r) Reyholds, Jonathan, of So. Kings- 
ton, R. I. b. Oct. 9, 1727 son of John 
and Hannah (Hall) Reynolds of Exeter, 
R. I. : m. Ann, dau. Robert Knowles. 
Joseph, father of John, b. Nov. 27, 
1652, second wife Merey : James, 
father of Joseph, died 1702, left wife 
Deborah : Wm., father of James, settled 
in Providence with Roger Williams. 
Ancestry and war record desired. 

N. R. G. 

80. (a) Beach. — Caleb, said to have 
lived at one time in Lisbon, Ct. m. 
Keziah Hebard and had Lucy b. Dec. 
21, 1747, m. Mch. 9, 1769, Benajah 
Strong. Supposed to be descended 
from John Bishop of Guilford 1639, 
mentioned in Savage. Is there a Bishop 
genealogy in existence? Desired, 
ancestry of Caleb Beach. 



(b) Hinman, Rhoda, b. 1748 d. 1812, 
m. Aaron, son of Isaac and Mary 
(Rockwell) Norton. Desired, ancestry 
of Rhoda. 

(c) Pell, John, lived in Sheffield, 
Mass., (said to be son of John) m. 
Nov. 22, 1733, Miriam Sackett of 
Westfield, Mass. Desired, his ancestry. 

VV. W. N. 
1. (a) Tilden. — John, son of Thomas 
and Lettice (Turner) Tilden of Nor- 
wich, Conn., b. prob. after 1744 : what 
became of him? Where did he locate? 
He was living in 1798 according to his 
sister's will probated 1806. 
(b) Stilhnan. — Martha, m. shortly after 
the close of the French and Indian 
War, Thomas T. Tilden of Norwich, 
Conn., and moved to Sandisfield, Mass., 
whither went in 1756 many families 
from Enfield, Wethersfield and adjoin- 
ing towns. Who were her parents, 
when born, and where and when 
married? 

(e) Page. — Wm., of Windham, Conn., 
m. before 1797, Mrs. Lucy (Tilden) 
Upton, wid. of Elias Upton, Jr., and 
had: 1. Wm. 2. Lucy. 3. James. 
4. Amy. 5. Ezra. 6. Laura. 7. 
Tryphena (perhaps). Desired, partic- 
ulars of their family and descendants. 
Whom did they marry? Where live? 

(d) Abbe. — John, of Windham, Conn., 
m. March 2, 1774, Delight Tilden of 
Norwich Conn. Who were his parents ? 
Was she his second wife? They had a 
dau. Pamela m. Jan. 1, 1797, Jonathan 
Geer and had : 1. Meribah. 2. 
Joseph. 3. Jonathan. 4. Mariah, 
and others, who were the others? 
Birth dates of these desired. Was 
Pamela the only child ? Desired cor- 
respondence with any descendants. In 
1809 Delight (Tilden) Abbe drew her 
will ; speaks of herself as wid. ; gives 
all property including two family Bibles 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



439 



to dau. Pamela Geer. Records from 

those Bibles greatly desired. 

E. A. S. 

82. Letmore. — (or Latimer), Ann of 
Wethersfield, m. Nov. 30, 1699, Ebene- 
zer Bishop of Guilford and d. Oct. 6, 
1752. Desired, her ancestry. 

M. B. B. 

83. (a) Gladding. — Azariah (my gt. 
gr. father) m. Anna Hudson, dau. of 
Thomas of Saybrook and his wife Mar- 
garet Neal who were m. March 29, 
1736. Wanted, names and residences 
of parents of Azariah. 

(b) Riley. — Lucretia, of Middletown, 

m. Elijah Hills of and had : 1. 

Elvira b. Sept. 9, 1807. 2. Henry. 3. 
Edward. 4. Loren. Wanted, resi- 
dences, dates and parent's names of 
Lucretia. W. H. G. 

84. Barnes. — Deborah,Esther and Mary, 
daughters of Capt. Joshua, of North 
Haven, married respectively, Timothy 
Shattock, Jonathan Barnes, Zopher 
Barnes. Wanted the ancestry of their 
husbands, dates of births and marriages 
and communication with descendants. 

T. C. Barnes, Collinsville, Conn. 

85. Thompson. — Warren, m. Apr. 7, 
1803, Redexa Loomis of East Windsor. 
Who were his parents ? F. B. 

86. (a) Minard (Maynard). — Chris- 
topher, m. Lucretia Tinker, and had 
Grace, m. Sept. 8, 1808, at Salem, Ct., 
Thomas Kingsley, and had John King- 
sley, m. Mary O. Tyler. Who were 
parents of Thomas Kingsley ? 

(b) Rogers. — Hannah, b. Jan. n, 1756, 

at New London, Ct., m. Merri- 

man of what is now Southington, Ct. 
What was her ancestry, her husband's 
first name and his ancestry? 

E. L. R. 
^87. Eldridge. — Mason, b. in Norwich 
and d. there 1831 ; m. Betsey Reynolds, 
b. in Thompson sometime before 1825. 



Wanted, date of birth of Mason and 
ancestry. Also if ancestors served in 
Revolutionary War. E. R. Paine. 

88. Barnes. — Abigail, m. David Cooper, 
of North Haven who was b. 1778. 
Esther Barnes m. Titus Todd, June 7, 
1 7 1 8. Freelove Barnes m. about 1 7 70, 
Benjamin Graves, perhaps of Guilford. 
Wanted, parents and grandparents and 
date of birth of Abigail, Esther and 
Freelove. 

T. C. Barnes, Collinsville, Conn. 

89. (a) Cary — Joseph, of Middle Had- 
dam, Conn., m. Abigail Bigelow. 
Wanted, the parentage of Joseph Cary, 
both father and mother. The father 
supposed to have come from Rhode 
Island ; the mother of French ancestry. 
(b) Higgins. — Jesse of MiddleHaddam, 
Conn., m. Keziah Stevens, 1775. 
Wanted their ancestry. D. S. 

90. Sill. — Joseph of Milford, Conn., one 
of the " after planters " of 1648. (See 
Lambert's " History of the Colony of 
New Haven," page 91.) Wanted, any 
facts relative to his ancestry, descen- 
dants, or other personal history. 

E. E. S. 

91. Baker. — Elizabeth, married March, 
171 7, at West Hartford, John Flower, 
who was b. 1694, Hartford, Conn. 
They had seven children including a son 
Nathaniel. Ancestry of Elizabeth 
Baker wanted. M. A. S. 

92. Hitchcock. — Ann, supposed to be 
the wife of Eleakim Hitchcock, (b. Feb. 
14, 1712, in Colchester, Conn.,) having 
administered his estate at his death, 
Dec. 4, 1758. Wanted, the birth, 
names, marriage and death records of 
her parents, who were married about 
1736-7. Their first child, Ann, was 
bapt. April 1, 1739. Will give $3.00 
for above information. 

Mrs. Horace H. Dyer, 

Rutland, Vt. 



440 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



■93. Whaley. — Hezekiah, d. Aug. 15, 
1835. Is he the one mentioned in 
" The Connecticut Men of the Revolu- 
tion ? " When was he born? Wanted, 
his ancestry. J. S. W. 

'94. Chapman. — The following are from 
the records of the First Congregational 
Church of Ashford, Conn. : March the 
last day of it 1739, was Mary Chapman, 
wife of Thomas Chapman, by virtue of 
a letter of recommendation from the 
Pastor of the church in Lebanon re- 
ceived to be of the church in full com- 
munion — Sept. 1 2, 1742, Thomas Chap- 
man recommended by a letter from the 
€hurch of Christ in Windham Village 
or from Mr. Mosly pastor was received 
into this church in full communion. 
May 26, 1 75 1, Benjamin Chapman, 
son of Thomas Chapman was baptized. 
Did Thomas have brothers or sisters, 
and what was the name of his father ? 
Is this branch of the Chapmans con- 
nected with one of the families whose 
genealogy has already been published. 
Dwight M. Chapman, 

67 Marble Street, 

Springfield, Mass. 

95. (a) C/infen. — Joseph, m. Esther 
Wooden at New Haven, March 31,1726, 
Who was Joseph Clinten's father? 

(/) Did the above Joseph Clinten's 
son Joseph, b. at New Haven, Sept. 19, 
^SS^go to New Canaan, Conn., and 
marry Phoebe Benedict? 
{c) Was the above Phoebe the dau. of 
Ebeneza Benedict, who was bapt. in 
New Canaan, Oct. 21, 1733? K. C.K. 

96. Lathrop. — Backus, or Bacchus, m. 
about 1798 or 9 Mary Culver. Their 
children were Mary A., who m. Austin 
S. Mott of Middletown, and Daniel, 
name of wife unknown — first name sup- 
posed to have been Polly. The wife of 
Bacchus Lathrop was about 40 years 
old at the time of marriage, so he was 



probably born about 1755 or 1760. 
How was he connected with families of 
of Dr. Joshua Lathrop and Dr. Daniel 
Lathrop? E. W. J. 

ABINGTON, CONN., CHURCH RECORDS — 

DEATHS. 
Continued from page 247, Connecticut Magazine 
for April, i8<pg. 
1814. 

Jan. 12. A child of Capt. Thomas 
Grosvenor aet. 20 mos. 

Jan. 14. Mr. Silas Cleavland an old 
man from Canterbury. 

Feb. 6. Mr. Seth Chase aet. 71. 

Feb. 20. Mr. Austin Stowel in the 28th 
yr. of his age. 

Mch. 3. Miss Nancy Slade aet. 41. 

Mch. 4. Miss Sarah Osgood aet. 44. 

Mch. 6. Widow Anne Slade aet. 64. 

Mch. 7. The wife of Mr John Perry. 

Mch. 8. A Negro Boy in the family of 
Thos. Allin Esqr. 

Mch. 14. The wife of Mr. David 
Sherman aet. 62. 

Mch. 16. Stutely, child of Mr. Thos. 
Field aet. 5. 

Mch. 23. The wife of Mr. David 
Packer, aet. 40. 

April 19. Widow Hannah Lyon, aet. 

63. 

April 24. George, child of Mr. Peter 
Cunningham, aet. 2. 

April 25. Caroline, a negro woman, 
aet. 30. 

May 10. Mr. David Ingals, aet. 66. 

May 14. Mr. Lyman Utley, aet. 22. 

May 22. Mr. Appleton Osgood,aet.7i. 

June 4. Mr. Samuel Dresser, aet. 68 ; 
on the line between the parishes. 

June 25. Mr. John Dresser, in the. 
7Qth yr. of his age. 

Aug. 15. A child of Mr. John Gould, 
aet. 3. 

Nov. 1. Miss Priscilla Utley, aet. 87. 

Nov. 10. Mrs. Elizabeth, wife of Mr. 
Samuel Griggs, aet. 74. 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



44 1' 



Nov. 27. Joseph Maguire, aet. 19. 

Dec. 29. A child of Mr. Calvin Pal- 
mer. 
1815. 

Jan. 1. Mrs. Phila, the wife of Mr. 
Charles Goodell, aet. 32. 

Jan. 25. A child of Mr. Wm. Sherman. 

Apr. 10. Capt. Oliver Ingals, aet 43 ; 
drowned. 

May 15. Mr. Jason Fisk, aged 45. 

June 18. Mr. Job Slade, aet. 35. 

July 25. An infant child of Mr. Clem- 
ent Sharpe. 

Aug. 28. An infant child of Mr. Be- 
noni Taylor. 

Oct. 4. The wife of Dr. Wm. Elliott. 

Dec. 2. The wife of Mr. Silas Chand- 
ler, aet. 66. 

1816. 

Jan. 10. Mr. Thomas Ingals, aet. 74. 

Mch. 8. An infant child of Mr. Abi- 
shai Pike. 

Mch. 8. An infant child of Mr. War- 
ren Lyon. 

Mch. 22. -Miss Hannah Ingals, aet. 32. 

Apr. 21. Miss Sarah Sharpe, aet. 72. 

June 15. An infant child of Isaac 
King, jr. 

Apr. 28. Widow Crane' in the 

79th yr. of her age. 

June 21. Widow Bethiah Ingals. 

July 15. Trueman Kendal, in the 18th 
yr. of his age. 

July 27. Mrs. Sophia, wife of Capt. 
Elisha Lord, aet. 42. 

Nov 1. Child of Mr. Blackmour. 

Dec. 26. Dr. Robert Baxter, in the 
85 th yr. of his age. 
1817. 

Feb. 25. Miss Lydia Walker, in the 
76th yr. of her age. 

Oct. — . Infant child of Mr. George 
S. Ingals. 
1818. 

Mch. 13. The wife of Mr. Daniel Clapp. 



Mch. 24. A child of Capt. Wareham, 
Williams, aet. 2. 

Mch. 3 1 . Miss Lydia Clement, aet. 29.. 

Apr. 2. A child of Joseph Malbone 
and wife, persons of color. 

May 5. Mr. John Ingals, aet. 80. 

July 25. Mr. Daniel Clapp. 

Sept. 14. Harriet Ingals, (suddenly), 
daughter of the late Daniel and Bethiah 
Ingals, aet.. 1 2 years wanting five days. 

Oct. 7. Orinda, wife of Burnham Par- 
ish, aet. 17. 

Oct. 12. A child of Mr. Calvin Palmer, , 
in the 3rd yr. of his age. 

Oct. 19. An infant child of Mr. Jona- 
than Green. 

N ov. 1 1 . Molly Warner, died at Joseph 
Baxters. 

1819. 

Jan. 10. Sally Gould, in the 20th yr. 
of her age. 

Jan. 19. Mr. Amaziah Raymond, aet. 
84. 

Mch. 6. An infant child of Mr. Benja- 
min Fay. 

Mch. 9. A child of { Mr, John Williams,, 
aet. 2. 
1819. 

Mch. 19. George, a child of Mr. Abi- 
shai Pike, aet. 5, x\n infant child of Mr.. 
Artemas Downing. 

Mch. 30. Mr, Joseph Royal Ingals, 
aet. 35. 

Apr. 10. Miss Mary Whitney, in the 
88th yr. of her. age. 

June 4. The wife of Mr. James Phil- 
lips, aet 35. 

Aug. 10. Mrs. Eunice, wife of Mr.. 
Benjamin Ingals, in the 7 1st yr. of her age. 

Sept. 1. Miss Ruth Ingals, aet. 79. 

Oct. 30. Mr. Zachariah Osgood, in the 
88th yr. of his age. 
1820. 

Jan. 28... An. infant child of Charles 
Rogers. 



442 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Feb. 24. An infant child of Capt. A. 
White. 

Feb. 28. An infant child of Mr. Na- 
than Williams. 

Mch. 20. A child of Mr. David Hicks- 
aet. 10 mos. 

June 1. Widow Mary Ingals, relict of 
Mr. John Ingals. 

July 3. Widow Dresser, relict of 

Mr. Samuel Dresser, aet. 70. 

July 13. Miss Polly Sherman, aet. 27, 
daughter of Mr. David Sherman. 

Oct. 14. A child of Capt. Avery Fisher, 
aet. 1 yr. 

Nov. 4. Mr. Samuel Allen, aet. 87. 

Dec. 17. Mr. James Trowbridge, aet. 
82. 
1821. 

Feb. 1. Miss Lucretia Cunningham, 
aet. 25. 

Mch. i2. "Mary Ann, child of Mr. 
Henry Brown, aet. 9 mos. 

May 14. , a child of Mr. Scuy- 

ler Withey, aet. 5. 

About this time a grandchild of Mr. 
Silas Chandler. 

June 1. Jason King, aet. 19. 

July 2. Mr. Elijah Shumway, aet. 58. 

Oct. — . Mrs. , fifth daughter 

of Mr. Silas Chandler. 

Nov. 1. Mr. Oliver Holt, in the 49th 
yr. of his age, belonging to Cape Ann, 
Mass. 

Nov. 14. Mr. Davis Stephens, aet. 21. 

Nov. 17. Mr. Phillip Withey, aet. 64. 

Dec. 3 1 . Capt. Samuel Sumner, aet.5 5 . 
1822. 

Jan. 23. An infant child of Mr. Isaac 
King. 

Jan. 31. Mrs. Sally Welch, wife of Mr. 
Almond Welch, aet. 26. 

Mch. 2. Miss Lucy Goodell, aet. 45. 

Mch. 10. An infant child of Mr. David 
Packer. 

Mch. 12. Betsy, wife of Mr. David 
Packer, aet. 29. 



Mch. 18. Patty, wife of Mr. Isaac Law- 
ton, aet. 24. 

Mch. 28. Mr. David P. Warner, in the 
37th year of his age. 

Apr. 1. An infant child of Neptune 
Ingals, a person of color. 

Apr. 9. Mrs. Susanna, wife of Mr. 
Lemuel Stowell, in the 66th yr. of her age. 

May 6. An infant child of Capt. 
George S. Ingals. 

June 20. Dr. William Elliott, aet. 77. 

July 24. A child of Mr. Erastus Steb- 
bins, aet. 17 months. 

Oct. 6. A child of Capt. Avery Fisher, 
aet. 13 months. 

Oct. 12. Samuel Walter, child of Mr. 
Samuel H. Lyon, aet. iy, 10m, i5d. 

Dec. 1. Widow Mary Osgood, aet 78. 

Dec. 25. Mr. David Sherman, aet. 74. 
1823. 

Jan. 30. An infant child of Mr. Seth 
Chase. 

Feb. 22. , wife of Mr. Silas 

Rickard, aet. 54. 

Feb. 26. Widow Elizabeth Stowel in 
the 88th year of her age. 

Mch. 9. The wife of Mr. Reuben 
Spalding, aet. 66. 

April 21. Widow Sessions, in 

the 80th yr. of her age. 

Aug. 18. Deborah, only child of Mr. 
John C. Davison, aet. 21 months. 
1823. 

Oct. 6. Mr. Ebenezer Creasy, aet. 78. 

Oct. 7. An infant child of Mr. Benja- 
min Spalding, aet. 7 months. 

Oct. 12. Mr. Samuel Huntington 
Lyon, only child of Rev. Walter Lyon, 
aet. 37 years and 13 days. He was born 
Sept. 29th, 1786. 

Dec. 25. A child of Neptune Ingals, 
a person of color, aet. 2. 

Dec. 27. An infant child of Mr. 

Smith. 

Dec. 28. Mr. Nathaniel Stowel, aet.63. 
( To be Continued,') 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



PUBLIC ART GALLERIES. 

THE distinguishing feature of modern 
civilization is that it brings, with the 
least amount of effort, the best that is 
known and thought in the world to a 
larger number of individuals than were 
ever before enabled to come in contact with 
the influences and tendencies which pro- 
duce culture in the best sense of that word. 
The channels through which it operates 
are many and varied. , One of the most 
important of them, the free public library, 
has seen an astonishing development 
during the last quarter of a century. It 
is a small place indeed, which cannot at 
the present time boast the presence in its 
midst of one of these powerful educa- 
tional factors. But book culture alone is 
a narrow intellectual condition at best 
and something more is needed if we are 
to have a well rounded national culture. 
The development of artistic instincts and 
an intelligent art sense is no less essential 
and imperative. 

The chief cause of the fine arts attaining 
the perfection they did in Greece was due 
to the fact that they had become necessi- 
ties to the highly cultured people of that 
country. This is precisely the condition 
which we should endeavor to have prevail 
among us : a feeling that the beautiful 
creations of art are necessities in our daily 
life, and necessities not only to the narrow 
circles of wealth and fashion, but to the 
lives and every day experience of the 
humblest man, woman and child. It is 
not enough that a few large cities contain 
priceless art treasures and support schools 
of instruction in the fine arts ; these things 
should be brought closer to the homes of 
the people and of all those whose con- 
ditions of life prevent their visiting or 
studying in the great art centres. There 
is just as much reason for public art 
galleries as for public libraries ; if the 
latter are necessary the former certainly 
443 



are and their influence in beautifying the 
lives, raising the moral tone and broaden- 
ing the intelligence cf the people is beyond 
estimate. 

Haifa hundred municipalities in Great 
Britain have their public art galleries 
which are liberally supported by the cities 
and their men of wealth. There is no 
good reason why Connecticut's cities and 
towns should not enjoy similar advantages 
and if her wealthy citizens or proud sons 
in other states are seeking an appropriate 
object for their munificence what could 
possibly benefit their fellow-men more, or 
cause themselves to be more gratefully 
remembered, than the endowment of an 
art institution in the place of their birth 
or that wherein their riches have been 
accumulated? Should the next twenty- 
five yesrs see the establishment of as many 
art galleries as the last have seen public 
libraries, a magnificent stride will have 
been taken in the direction of making us 
an art loving and artistic as well as a 
practical and commercial nation. It is to 
be remembered, however, that these in- 
stitutions of the future must be absolutely 
free and their hours of opening such as to 
suit the convenience of every class of 
citizens, or the very object for which they 
were created will be defeated. Morning, 
noon and night their doors must be open 
to the artisan and the professional man, 
the artist and the laborer, to rich and 
poor, and to servants and masters. 
Picture galleries open but a few hours on 
week days might as well not be open at 
all so far as the interest of those who most 
need them is concerned. If the early 
years of the new century show evidences 
of progress in this line it is sure to result 
in the advancement of art itself and, what 
is really of more importance, in the en- 
nobling of the common life by adding to 
it the element of the Beautiful. 



THE MORSE BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

ITS WONDERFUIv SYSTEM OF TRAINING FOR BUSINESS THROUGH ACTUAL 
BUSINESS PRACTICE. 




EW people who have not attended a 
business college conducted under 
the International Business Practice 
plan, have any idea of the practical value in 
education that this realistic scheme possesses. 
It will accordingly be of interest to many 




Prof. E. H. MORSE. 

parents who are seeking a commercial or 
shorthand training for their sons or daughters 
to at this season of the year review some of 
the prominent features of a business course 
at one of the best equipped business colleges. . 
When Mr. E. H. Morse, the present prin- 
cipal of the Hartford School, took charge of 
444 



what was then Hannum's or the Bryant & 
Stratton College, the plan, like most others 
now in use at Connecticut schools, was to 
teach business theoretically from text books 
or mechanical devices. This did not get 
iust the results Principal Morse desired, so 
he set about perfecting a systen of 
teaching business through real 
practice, which now under control 
of the International Business Prac- 
tice Association affords a student 
such an aggregation of advantages 
in the real experience of office 
work as to thoroughly equip him 
for immediate service in business. 
./' This Association is composed of 

, the leading business colleges of 

each state of the United States, 
the Provinces of Canada, and the 
Countries of Europe. Its purpose 
is to illustrate and teach business 
just exactly as it is practiced in the 
commercial and financial world. 
. The members and promoters of 

the interests of the Association are 
the best business educators of 
America,. England and Germany, 
and those who are recognized as represent- 
ing the best thought of the times in business 
affairs. Students of the representative col- 
leges correspond and practice business 
among themselves through the medium of 
the U. S. mails, so that all kinds of business 
transactions, buying, selling, shipping, re- 



ceiving, and corresponding, and the settle- 
ments and exchange of business forms re- 
quired by same are carried out exactly as 
they would be if the transactions meant real 
dollars and cents. Each of these cities in 
which a member of the Association is located 
is identified with the production of the staple 
commodities of its locality. The students of 
these colleges accordingly not only write up 
and use business forms, and learn customs 
and accounts, but are led to become ac- 
quainted with practical commercial geogra- 



Banking, bringing them much nearer the 
standard ot actual business than has ever 
before been reached. There is no imagina- 
tion whatsoever entertained in this practice, 
unless it be the value of the college currency 
used and the tickets substituted for the real 
merchandise. 

For several years The Morse Enterprise 
has had the reputation of having produced 
the best work of the Association. Indeed it 
is looked upon as a model school of this new 
education. Many young men have gone out 




DEPARTMENT OF ACTUAL BUSINESS PRACTICE. 
Every student has an oak roll-top desk. 



phy, in locating the staple products of the 
different parts of this and other countries, 
their distribution and consumption. A 
National Commerce is thus demonstrated and 
brought within the range of school work. 

By this means of trade and correspondence 
between students of these colleges, instruc- 
tion and practical work are combined in 
Transportation, Insurance, Shipping, Com- 
mission, Jobbing, Importing, Wholesaling and 



from the Morse College, after having taken 
this course and at once assumed the duties 
of merchant's and manufacturer's offices. 
Many also have gone directly into advance 
banking positions and offices of insurance 
companies, performing their duties to the 
perfect satisfaction of their employers. The 
college office is open every day to visitors, 
and catalogs and other descriptive circulars 
can be had for the asking. 



445 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



Any of the competitors for the Israel 
Putnam prize, may have their manuscript 
returned should they so desire, if they will 
send us the required postage. 



Attention is called to the Potpourri column 
which will contain short notes from any who 
have contributions of State interest to offer 
on historical or current matters, facts regard- 
ing our public men, notes of patriotic societies 
or matters of humorous incident. The pub- 
lishers will use same if available. 



If your newsdealer cannot supply you with 
the Connecticut Magazine address your 
wants to the office of publication at Hartford, 
Conn. 

In the advertising pages will be seen the 
announcement regarding " Picturesque Con- 
necticut" a handsome thirty-two page book 
just published by the Connecticut Magazine 
Co., showing views in all parts of the State. 
A limited edition has been printed. To any 
desiring a copy who cannot avail themselves 
of our offer, we will mail same on receipt of 
50 cents. 

The Publishers have many inquiries re- 
garding cost of binding the back numbers of 
the Connecticut Quarterly. We refer our 
readers to the announcement in our advertis- 
ing pages of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard 
Co. of Hartford. They will attend to your 
wants carefully and inexpensively. 



Hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent 
annually in advertising. Many advertisers 
expect direct results — many results only in 
a general way Some complain that adver- 
tising is uncertain, and yet the business house 
or manufacturer of a proprietary article who 
does not advertise falls behind in the race 
for business supremacy. 

The effectiveness of an advertisement is 
measured by its power to produce results. 

446 



The publishers of the Connecticut Maga- 
zine frequently hear good reports from their 
advertisers. 

We quote a few letters which may be con- 
vincing. 

SpringfieIvD, Mass., July 5, 1899. 
The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

Yours of the 3d inst, is at hand, and has 
our attention. You may insert the ad in the 
July number, as we are pleased to inform you 
that we have had very good returns from 
those you have already inserted. 
Yours very truly, 

E. STBBBINS MFG. CO. 
H. M. Brewster, Treas. 
[The ad was taken on trial for one inser- 
tion in May, and has been continued since.] 

Harteorb, Conn. 
The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Gentlemen : 

I am very much pleased with the results 
from our advertisement in the magazine. We 
have received more benefit from this ad than 
from any other which we have carried in the 
daily papers and other periodicals. I wish 
the magazine success and believe the time is 
near at hand when your medium will be more 
appreciated by the advertising public, reach- 
ing as it does the best families in this state. 
Yours truly, 
. W. J. MARTIN, 

Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Central New England Railway. 

Storrs, Conn. 
The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 
GenTeemen : 

* * -* * We believe your advertisement is 
doing our College a great deal of good. 
Yours very truly, 
GEO. W. FLINT, Pres't, 
Storrs Agricultural College 



*> 

w 



Pupils Learn 



to do by doing at 




the entire course being Actual Business Practice. 




Every day the pupil learns new things, and not a minute of time 
is wasted. This college does the best work, as there is no guessing. 
It clears up the rusty spots in a boy's education, and makes bright 
office assistants out of ordinary people because pupils are not poured 
into a hopper and ground out in one batch, regardless of previous 
education. Every pupil stands on his own merits. Seven teachers 
devote their whole time to fit our pupils for office-work, which insures 
rapid progress to all students. 

24 first-class typewriting machines for pupils' use. The school 
occupies three entire floors, one floor being filled with business men's 
office desks for pupils 1 use. We placed over 380 graduates in situations 
he 28 months ending August 4th. Passenger elevator and telephone. 
A slight idea ot the excellence of this school may be obtained by reading 
Catalogues "C" & "F." Tuition by term or month. 




3o Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 



School opens August 28. 



E. M. HUNT5INGER. 



POTPOURRI. 

The Publishers can use short contributions 
of historical value, as applying to the State, 
for the Potpourri column; also various matters 
of humorous incident, facts about our public 
men, patriotic society notes and the like. 
Any contributions will have the Editor's 
attention and will find mention if available. 

Mansfield Post of Middletown, will as 
soon as possible erect a monument to Gen- 
eral Mansfield on the battlefield of Antietam. 
The $1,000 that was appropriated by the 
state only pays for the shaft itself. There is 
nothing allowed for the foundation or the 
setting of the stone. The expense will be 
about $150, and to meet this some of them 
have started a popular subscription. It is 
proposed to have the monument in place 
this fall. It is to mark the spot .where the 
general fell during the engagement. 

* 
Editor of The Connecticut Magazine. 

Permit me to contradict the statement in 
the July issue, referring to Nathan Hale as 



insured 
investments. 



Bristol, Conn., Nov. 12, 1898. 

Mr. E. C. Linn, Sec'y and Treas., 

The Connecticut Building and Loan Association, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Dear Sir; I am just in receipt of the check of 
the Association for $1,091.00, in payment of the 
maturity value of ten shares (insured class), held 
by my late husband, which also includes the reserve 
accumulations of the shares. 

I wish to thank yon for your promptness in the 
settlement of this claim. Yours truly, 

Clara J. Clayton. 

$10 a month for 120 months produces $2,000, 
which will be paid in cash upon maturity of shares, 
or at prior death the proceeds of the life insurance 
will be paid to heirs together with 'ash withdrawal 
value of shares. 

Assets, Over, - - - $850,000.00 

Guarantee Fund, (paid in Cash;, 100,000.00 

The Connecticut Building and 

Loan Association, 

252 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Opera, 

Vaudeville, 

Band, 

or any musical seki 
tion to order. 

The best of the Talk- 
ing Machine Family is- 
either the Grapho- 
phone or Phonograph 

They want a home. 
Why not adopt them 
They are the mo?' 
talented musicians, 
will comfort the sick, 
cheer up the saddest 
homes or make ;i 
happy home more 
cheerful. 
Catalogue on Application 





FROM S5.00 UPWARDS, 



Hartford Graphophone Co* 



EDWIN T. NORTHAM, 
Manager. 



80 Trumbull Street, HARTFORD, CONN, 



HISHOLINESS POPE LEO XIII 
AWARDS GOLD MEDAL 

In Recognition ofgenefits Received from 






fJXTjJ 


1 * 1 1 1 1 



MARIANI WINE TONIC 



FO/fBODK BAA/Mam //£/?V£S 

Spec/al Oeeep - 7b a// w/?o wr/fe as /nenf Zon- 
ing f/7/s paper, we sen of a doo/r containing por- 
tra/tsanct endorsements offMPEftOPS, £atpp£SS, 
P/?///CES>CAPD/A/A/.Sy A/tc//e/s//ops, an of ot/iet cf/st/n~ 
ga/snec/ 'personages. 

A/Afi/AA// & Co., 52 W£sr/5 T ."Sr. New Vow. 

FOR SALE AT AU Dftl/GG/STS EV£EYW//f/?£. AM/DSUBSr/ri/TES. B£IVA/?£OE/M/rAT/OMS. 

PAws-4/£ou/eyara'h'c?ussmdr?/? ) loa/doN'33 Mortimer Sr. Mor?treat-87$rJamesSt. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued . 

having taught in East Haddam in 1774-75. 

Nathan Hale taught in East Haddam 
shortly after his graduation from Yale in the 
fall of 1773 till he accepted the offer of the 
New London Grammar School. He was 
teaching in New London in the spring of 
1774 for it is from that place he wrote to his 
friend, Roger Alden, May 2, 1774 : 

"I am at present in a school at New 
London. I think my situation preferable to 
what it was last winter, etc." 
Very truly, 
Charlotte Molyneux Holloway, 
New London, Ct. Author of Life of Hale. 



The thriving Connecticut Society of the 
Order of Founders and Patriots at its 
last annual meeting, held in New Haven, 
elected Col. Norris G. Osborn of New 
Haven, Governor; Col. Edward E. Sill of 
New Haven, Secretary ; and William F. 
Waterbury of Stamford, Registrar. 



Editor of The Connecticut Magazine. 

In the July number of the Magazine, on 
I page 360, appears an anecdote as to Ran- 
I dolph and one " Marcy of Connecticut." 
J This must be a misprint or a mistake. The 

lists of Connecticut's Senators and repre- 
: sentatives in Congress as given in the Con- 
; necticut Register contains no such name as 
i " Marcy." As I have met the anecdote pre- 
! viously, the Connecticut man mentioned was 

Senator Uriah Tracy. 

Yours truly, 

Tylerville, Conn. Rollin U. Tyler. 



In the Pennsylvania Magazine of History 
and Biography for April, 1899, page 105, is 
a record of baptisms by Rev. John Sharpe at 
Rye, N. Y., in 1709, and at Stratford, Conn., 
in 1 7 10. 




Harvey & Lewis, Opticians, PHOTOGRAPHIC 

865 Main St , Hartford, Conn. SUPPLIES. . . . 



ICE 
CREAM 

FRESH 

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FAN'CY 
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Telephone 
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The Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. 




WM. B. CLAKK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary/ E. O. WEEKS, Vice-President; 

A. C. ADAMS, HENRY E. REES, Assistant Secretaries. 



FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF 

SAFES 

ROBERT H. ASHMEAD 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



TO NEW YORK DAILY. 




Stopping at all Connecticut River Landings. 



LOW RATES. 


SECURITY. 


Quick Dispatch. 


COMFORT. 


Passenger and 
Freight Line. 


REFRESHING 
SLEEP. 



Passenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. m. and 
forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecticut river, and 
points North, East and "West from Hartford. We also have 
through traffic arrangements with lines out of New York or 
points South and West, and shipments can be forwarded on 
through rates, and Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the 
Company. For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co.= 

Steamers "Middlbtown" and "Hartfokd"'— Leave Hart- 
ford from foot State St. at 5 p. m.— Leave New York from Pier 
24, East River, at 5 p. m.— Daily except Sundays. 



CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY. 

Poughkeepsie Bridge "Route. 



SENT FREE 




For 1899, 



Is now ready for distribution, 



It contains over one hundred attractive half- 
tone illustrations, and is without doubt the 
handsomest hook of the kind ever issued by 
any railroad. It contains an increased list of 
Hotels and Boarding Houses, gives rates for 
board and all information sought after by those 
intending to summer in the country. Don't 
neglect getting a copy. Sent free for postage, 
six cents. 

W. J. MARTIN, Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Hartford, Conn. 



The 

Connecticut 

Farmer 

CONTAINS 

ALL the latest and best news pertaining to 
farming and its allied interests. No pains 
or expense are spared to make every de- 
partment of THE FARMER interesting to 
the Agriculturist. The quantity and quality 
of its reading matter and its mechanical 
execution is of the best. 

The Connecticut Farmer is mainly de- 
voted to affairs which concern the Agri- 
cultur 1 Public but its scope is by no means 
confined within such limits. Due attention 
is given to all correlative topics, including 
whatever appertains to home life, in city, 
town or village. 

It is one of the official organs of the State 
Grange and all the current P. of H. news is 
published in THE FARMER. 

The subscription price is ONE Dollar 
per year. Trial subscription from date to 
January 1, 1900, FORTY CENTS. Send 
for sample copy. 

The Farmer Publishing & 
Printing Co., 

Hartford, Conn. 



^JTUAA/: 



S.3OTO7Z.30. /jj\ 

7.30 r<> f 



* 



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9 







TAKE £ LEVATOR. 



cmn< t 



METAL LATH. 

This article is fast superseding the wooden spruce lath for plas- 
tering. It is fire-proof, does not shrink and thereby crack the 
plastering, and is exceedingly durable, takes less space and holds 
plaster the best. 

JOHN B. CLAPP & SON, 

61 Market Street, 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



The Auctioneer, BESTOR 

Sales conducted throughout the state on Real 
Estate, Land Plots, Farms, Live Stock, Store 
Stocks, Furniture, Art Sales, etc. Write me 
if you wish to sell. 



Howard G. Bestor, 



Hartford, Ct. 



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POTPOURRI— Continued. 

Editor of The Connecticut Magazine. 

In your last number Mr. Leete states 
in his article, entitled "Away from the 
Railroad in Connecticut," that General 
Washington is said to have learned while 
at Litchfield of Arnold's treason. The 
Chevalier de Pontgiband, "a French 
volunteer of the war of independence," 
in his memoirs (D. Appleton & Co., 
1898) says that Andre after his capture 
was taken to King's ferry on the North 
River at which place Washington soon 
after arrived and there learned of the 
capture and discovered Arnold's treason. 
Pontgiband was with Col. Hamilton, who 
had been sent by Washington to examine 
the prisoner, when he was identified as 
Andre. C. H. Jones. 

New Haven. 

* * 

* 

Once more the report is current that 
the Hempstead Diary, now in the posses- 
sion of the New London County Historical 
Society is about to be printed. This is 
perhaps the most historically important 
diary remaining unprinted within the 
limits of the state, and it is to be hoped 
that the report will prove to have been 

well founded. 

* * 

* 

The two hundredth anniversary of the 
First Congregational church of Enfield, 
Conn., was celebrated at the church on 
Saturday and Sunday, June 3rd and 4th. 
All of the exercises were largely attended 
and much interest was manifested. The 
principal historical address was delivered 
by the pastor Rev.O.W.Means, who proved 
himself well qualified for the work. Shorter 
addresses were made by Judge C. H. 
Brescoe, Dr. E. F. Parsons, and Hun. J. 
Warren Johnson. In this connection it is 
a pleasure to note that the history and 
records of Enfield are soon to be published. 
It is understood that the work will com- 
prise three sizable volumes, and that it is 
now in the press. 




NeVdr 

Need 
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THE 

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They look like linen but laundry bills are saved. The first 
cost is the only cost. New catalogue mailed free. Write for 
it. We make it interesting for live Agents. 

The Windsor Collar & Cuff Co., 

Chicago, 111. Windsor, Conn. 




Cheap Printing! 

^^ WB buys a handy little Portable Press for cards, 
^H^ afe labels, envelopes, etc $18 pre-s for circu- 
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paper, etc., direct to the factory. 

KELSEY & CO., 



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MERIDEN CONN. 



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POTPOURRI— Continued. 

With the celebration of our national inde- 
pendence and the town's] bi-centennial the 
good people of Durham were busier than 
bees on July fourth. Extensive preparations 
had been made for the occasion, and the 
presence of about 8,000 people testified to 
the general interest. The parade was re- 
markably fine, and the historical scenes rep- 
resented were of much interest. The exer- 
cises were held on old meeting house green 
where Hon. Henry G. Newton of New Haven 
presided. Rev. Joseph Hooper made the 
principal address of the day. Representa- 
tives of a number of towns and historical 
societies were present, several of whom made 
short addresses. A fine display of colonial 
relics was a feature of the day. 

* * 

* 

The handy little publication, Trips by 
Trolley and A-Wheei around Hartford, now 
in its second year of publication, includes in 
its pages a historical description and illustra- 
tion of all the towns reached by trolley from 
Hartford, Rockville, Manchester, East Hart- 
ford, South Windsor, Glastonbury, Rain- 
bow, Windsor, Wethersfield, West Hartford, 
Farmington, Berlin, New Britain and Bristol. 
There is also a description of Hartford as 
one sees it from the dome of the Capitol and 
views and maps of Hartford's Park and 
Reservoir system ; also the various pleasure 
resorts around Hartford. 

There are also tables of distances, fares 
and running, time of the electric cars and 
the steamboats on the Connecticut River. 
For the Bicycle rider there are over twenty 
trips giving distances and condition of road. 

The book is full of information and is 
having a ready sale by all bookstores or may 
be obtained by mail from the publishers, 
White & Warner, Box 431, Hartford, Conn. 
Price, 10 cents. 

* 

The Birth of the American Flag. A 
committee consisting of Washington, Robert 
Morris, and George Ross was given au- 
thority to select and submit a design for 




Fheodor F.Gelbart. 
ROOM N?8. 



BURNED OUT 

at the Howard Building Fire, but 

IN BUSINESS AGAIN 

at 164 State St., Olds & Whipple Bldg . 

H MANTELS 
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HANDSOME 
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Get our prices before buying-. 

The HARTFORD MANTEL and TILE GO. 

•Ii. M. GLOVEB, Manager. 

Manufacturers and Manufacturers' Agents. 
Mosaics, Interior Marble and Slate; Gas Combination 
and Electric Light Fixtures; Fireplace Furniture of all 
Descriptions. 

164 State St., Hartford, Ct. Telephone Connection- 




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Increases your vitality. 

Insures good health. 

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POTPOURRI— Continued, 
the new flag. The meeting of this committee 
was undoubtedly held at General Hancock's 
house, just a block from Betsy Ross's home, 
and as circumstances required that the mat- 
ter be done as secretly as possible, and the 
services of a skillful needlewoman were 
needed, it was perfectly natural that George 
Ross should suggest his niece, so near at 
hand, and in whom he was so much inter- 
ested. To her house, therefore, they re- 
paired, and upon being asked by her uncle 
whether or not she thought she could make 
the flag, she replied with true American 
spirit, " I do not know, but I will try." 

General Washington, having a fairly clear 
idea of what was wanted, made a pencil 
sketch of the flag with the now familiar thir- 
teen stripes, but with a blue field and thirteen 
stars in the place of the cross of St. George. 
Mrs. Ross, being of a very practical turn of 
mind, noticed that Washington's stars were 
six-pointed, and suggested a five-pointed star 
as being easier to make. Washington re- 
plied that he had supposed a six-pointed one 
could be more easily formed, but Betsy 
promptly settled the question by folding a 
piece of paper and with one clip of her 
scissors producing a perfect five-pointed star. 
Thus it was that the stars in our flag are five- 
pointed in place of the customary six-pointed 
star of heraldry, and Betsy Ross did it with 
her little scissors. The matter was then left 
for Betsy's skillful fingers to complete, and in 
due time the finished flag was ready for in- 
spection. The committee again visited the 
house, were shown into the little back parlor, 
and after some discussion the design was 
accepted. It was not, however, formally 
adopted by Congress until the 14th of June, 

1777. 

— From Self Culture for August. 



PRESERVE 

mm QUARTERLIES 

They will make a valuable addition to 
your library when they are bound. 

WE BIND THEM in Russia Back and Corners, 
Raised Bands, with Marble Paper Sides, $1.00 

1'er Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Back and Corners, as above, $1.25 

All kinds and qualities of Magazine Binding. 

Blank Books of every description with flat opening backs. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 

HARTFORD, CONN, 



&FEC1 
>DE5I6I1ER 

'HARTFORD; 



At MADISON, Co Xtt ut ' s BEACH. 

Choice lots for sale, directly on the water, 
others a short distance back with shore 
privilege, good boating, fishing and bathing 

Furnished Cottages to Rent, J. M. HULL, 



MN-QUIN J22S* 

■n ithout producing dizziness or ringing in the ears 
BOX SENT to any address on receipt of 25 cts. All Druggists. 

NON-QUIN CO., Hartford, Conn. 



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GIVEN to our READERS 

4 ' Picturesque Connecticut. " 




O doubt many of our readers would 
like a copy of " Picturesque Connec- 
ticut ' ' a handsome thirty-two page 
book just published by The Connecticut Maga- 
zine Company presenting a collection of Con- 
necticut views that is seldom equalled. Let 
us tell you how to possess it. 

Notice that the page opposite is divided 
into ten squares, each numbered consecu- 
tively, marked Connecticut Magazine Pur- 
chase Slip, containing blank space to be 
filled out. We ask our readers to cut out 
these slips separately then look over the ad- 
vertising pages of the January, February, 
March, April, May, June, July and August 
numbers of this year. If you have a purchase 
to make try to patronize those whose ads. 
appear in our columns. They are reliable 
houses or we would not carry their ads. With 



each purchase you make, present one of these 
slips for the signature or stamp of the ad- 
vertiser. 

If you purchase by mail, enclose one of the 
slips with order, and request the advertiser 
to fill it out and return. 

To any one returning ten slips, properly 
signed, to The Connecticut Magazine office, 
we will present this handsome thirty-two 
page book. The book will be a credit to any 
home, and will bring out the most attractive 
scenic features of our state. 

^This offer will apply to purchases made 
of any advertiser using space in the columns 
of The Connecticut Magazine during the 
months of January, February, March, April, 
May, June, July or August, 1899. 



MORAL: 

Help the ADVERTISER who is 
helping US to give YOU a good 
magazine. 

SEE OPPOSITE PAGE.^- 




; ■ ■ : M r 



decorative Study... 

N appropriate design and a proper blending of colors for 
home decoration is acquired after years of experience. An 
ability to produce a happy combination of the practical and the 
artistic is the secret of our success. We have made beautiful 
many of the finest homes in Connecticut. We give estimates on 
Church Work and Public Buildings, for Fresco Painting, 
Canvas Ceilings, Paper Hanging, Draping. 

Write us or call on us for ideas /9 o Q j . f 

on artistic interior decorating. s^rOSSCup OC JuUUeil, 

75 Pratt St. , Rms. 22 and 23 Steams' 1 Bldg., Hartford, Ct. 



10c 



STOPS FOUR HEADACHES 
OR NEURALGIA. 



SICK HEADACHE can be warded off by taking a 
powder upon the appearance of first symptoms. 



ACETON 

I OES IT IN TWENTY MINUTES. 






It is the only safe cure for Headaches and Neuralgia 
relieving the pain in a few minutes. It wi'l not disturb 
the Stomach, Kidneys, Liver or Heart. Package sent 
to any address on receipt of 10 CENTS. 



ACETON MEDICAL CO., MYSTIC, CONN 



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-®ff SEE OPPOSITE PAGE. 



CUT OUT THESE SLIPS. 



No. 1 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 

— T— PURCHASE SLIP 



The Publishers would request their advertisers to either 
affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail and return 
to purchaser. 



No. 2 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail and return 
to purchaser. 



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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail and return 
to purchaser. 



No. 9 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail and return 
to purchaser. 



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— * — PURCHASE SLIP 



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affix signature or business stamp below when this slip is 
presented, or when received through the mail and return 
to purchaser. 



.onfmn Tup rv*Ts.TKn?/-TT/-TTT> ivf a c a -7TM1T wVipn vmi write to advertisers. 



Covers Greater Area than Any Other Sprinkler Made 




THE globe, or body, of the sprinkler is made in two parts, and by means of the swiftly revolving arms, and interme- 
diate gears, the upper half is made to revolve slowly, carrying the hose nozzle, from which a full stream of water is 
thrown far out beyond the sprinkle of the arms, thereby covering a much larger space than any other sta- 
tionary sprinkler. V* ith an ordinary pressure of water, 20 pounds or upwards, it will thoroughly sprinkle an 
area 80 feet in diameter. The nozzle and the tips on end of arms are adjustable and can be set so as to sprinkle any desired 
space, or the nozzle can be set perpendicular to send the water upwavds in a straight stream like a fountain. 

A perforated disc, or rosette, is packed in each box and can be attached in place of the nozzle tip, discharging instead of 
a solid straight stream a very fine mist at the centre of the sprinkle of the revolving arms. 

With the exception of the legs all parts are of solid brass, heavily nickeled, making it the most durable, attractive and 
efficient sprinkler ever placed on the market. 

E. STEBBINS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

SOLE AGENTS AND MANUFACTURERS^ SPRINGFIELD, MASS,, U. S. A. 

Agents Wanted Everywhere Made for J. B. Fellows & Co., 90 Canal St., Boston. Mass 



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A BRIGHT BOY OR GIRL 



CAN SECURE ANY OF OUR 

SELECT PREMIUMS 

by sending us five (5) new yearly subscriptions to The Connecticut 
Magazine at $1.00 each. 

Send in each subscription as it is taken and we will give you due credit for each. On the 
remittance of the fifth we will mail you postpaid your choice of anyone of the premiums below. 



EITHER OF THESE 

Handsome and Useful Ingersoll Watches. 




Xiekel or gilt, stem wound and stem 
set, and WARRANTED for one year. 
If the watch is not what we guarantee 
it to be we will replace it by another. 
Your choice of either pocket watch or 
the new bicycle watch and attach- 
ment. Watch can be attached to handle bar 
moment's notice 



Your Choice— Famous Arms Pocket Books 




Fine Morocco Ladies Pocket 
Book with card pocket. Specie 
pocket, three extra pockets with 
button locks : card pocket with 
tuck. 




Fine Morocco Combination 
Safety Purse and Pocket-Book. 
Strongly made in neat and at- 
tractive styles, and adapted for 
gentlemen's or ladies" use. 

Three pockets : double lock. 



Address THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when vou write to advertisers. 



Ml h^^jM^ffk 




Send 

Us 

Two 


Mr.: Jfl^k. 




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Three^i a Leather Card Case. 

Both useful and pretty 

QMIWEMID? BAKER'S EXTRACTS 
OUUVLIIInCi AT ALL GROCERS. 


baker Extract Co., 


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MASS. 





SEND FOR FREE BOTTLE. 

TRUE BEAUTY is a combination of 

HANDSOME FEATURES and a SOFT VELVETY SKIN. 

If totj 

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consult 
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We will mail 
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ROYAL PEABL 

and descriptive circular free of all expense if 
we receive your address before July 15th. 




rhe Hi Ri Hale Co. Hartford, 



Ct. 




PERFECT — OMO 
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JRADE MARK, 



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When you buy a smith-premier, 

THE WRITING MACHINE EMBODYING ALL 
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Omo Manufacturing Co 

MIDDLETOWN, CONN. 



For Sale by every Dry Goods Dealer in the 
United States. ' *r Write for Booklet giving 
description of its manufacture. 



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Vol. V. 



September, 1899. 



No. 9. 




$I.OO a Year. HARTFORD, CONN. IP cts. a Copy. 



(j et your INSURANCE in 



The 



1 ravelers, 



OF HARTFORD, CONN. 



AND HAVE 
THE BEST. 



Issues- 



aCife and Sndowment Policies, 

All forms, low rates, non- forfeitable. 

Jlccident Policies 

Cover accidents of travel, sport, or business. 

Stealth Policies 

Granting stated sums of indemnity for disability caused by sickness 



JEiability S^olicies 



covering the liability of Manufacturers and other Employers to strangeis who may 
be injured upon their premises. The liability of Contractors to Employees and to 
strangers for injuries sustained upon buildings or other works under contract, etc. 



Jlssets, ~ ~ ~ $25,315,442.46 
liabilities , - 21,209,625.36 
&xeess sZS^rs, 4,105,817.10 



JAS. G. BATTERSON, President. JOHN E. MORRIS, Se retary 

S. C. DUNHAM, Vice-rresident. H. J. MESSENGER, Actuary. 



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THE 

Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



SEPTEMBER, \ 899. 



vol. v. CONTENTS. No. 9. 



Sharon Street. 

The Rose of Sharon. Illustrated. 
Our Life. Poem. 
A Pastor of the Church Militant. 
An Ancient School-Dame. 
An Old Time Hero. II. 
Time. Poem. 

List of Burials, Center Church Burying Ground, Hartforc 
Milford Cemetery. II. Illustrated. 
Rev. Dr. Charles M. Lamson. A Sketch. Illustrated 
A Rainy Day. Poem. Illustrated. 
\ Departments. — Genealogical Department. 

Editorial. 

Book Notes. 

Historical Notts. 



(Frontispiece.) 


Myron B. Benton, 


449 


Bert F. Case, 


467 


Frederick E. Xorton, 


468 


Emily S. Gil/nan, 


472 


Ellen D. Lamed, 


478 


Arthur Freemont Rider, 


480 


Annotated by Mary K. Talcott, 481 


M. Louise Greene, 


485 


Willision Walker, 


490 


Herbert Randall, 


492 




493 




495 




496 




496 



George C. Atwell, Editor. Edward B. Eaton, Business Manager. 



All communications should be addressed to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartlord, Conn. Remittances 
should be by check, express order, P. O. money order or registered letter. Money by mail at sender's risk. We 
promptly acknowledge by postal card all subscriptions received hy mail. When change of address is desired give 
both old and new address. Do not subscribe of a person unknown to you. Our authorized agents have full 
credentials. 



$J.OO a Year. THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. JO Cents a Copy. 

Published at 66 State St., Hartford, Conn, by The Connecticut Magazine Co. 
Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn, as mail matter of the second-class. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



The Connecticut Agricultural College* 

." Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, 
Where wealth accumulates, and men decay. 
Princes and lords may nourish or may fade, — 
A breath can make them, as a breath has made; 
But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, 
When once destroyed, can never be supplied " 

It has been truly said that " Education is a debt that the present owes to the future," 
but all are not agreed as to just how that debt shall be paid. Those, however, who have 
given the subject the most careful thought, and have studied intelligently the history of the 
past, concur in the opinion that the education to be projected into the future, the education 
that shall preserve and entail free institutions, should be directed by minds the best equipped 
in mental and moral science, literature and art, mathematical knowledge and mechanical 
skill, and physical law in the realm of nature. In this the Federal Government takes the 
initiative, and asks the States to build and equip colleges which shall give to the "Industrial 
Classes " not only practical education but also the skill to use it, and with her request gives 
the State of Connecticut annually by the " Land Grant " act of '62, over $6,000, and by the 
Morrill act of '90, $25,000 after this year; but conditionally, each fund for specific uses and 
nothing else. 

The Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs, Connecticut, in the town of Mansfield, 
is the college established by the State to meet conditions, on which the Federal funds may 
be received and used. All students of the State over fifteen years of age of both sexes are 
entitled to the privileges of this college, so far as its equipment will meet the demands 
made upon it. 




Entrance examinations will be held on Friday, September 1, Selectmen's Room, City 
Hall, Danbury, Council Chamber, City Hall, Norwich, and at the State Experiment Station, 
New Haven. Saturday, September 2, Room 50, Capitol Building, Hartford, First District 
School Building, East Winsted, and at the College, Storrs. 

The examinations will begin at 9 o'clock a. m. 

The new catalogues are now ready for distribution, and all requests for information will be 
promptly attended to. Address all communications to G. W. Flint, President, Storrs, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



Mrs. and Miss 

Cady's 
School 

£ FOR GIRLS. 

J Finishing and college preparatory courses of study. J| 
One hour and a half from New York. ^^^^^ \ 

\ 56 liillhouse Avenue, New Haven, Ct. 5 



f \ 


" • ; H 








w 


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'*iHa 


m 


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"^00SBSSM 


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Connecticut, bimsbury. 








McLean 


Seminary 


for Girls, 


College p reparatory. 
Music. 


English 


courses 


French, 
Rev. J. 


German, Art 
15. .VI c Lean. 



Park Avenue Institute *<* *>***& 

Young: Men. 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



Seth B. Jones, A. M., Principal. 
Twenty-eightbjyear under the same management. 
Illustrated Catalogue on application. 

Boxwood 
School 
for 
Girls. 

College 
Preparatory 
and elective 
course. 

Native French, Music and Art. Fully equipped Gymnasium. 
Mrs. Richard Sill Griswold, old Lvme, Conn. 




THE GUNNERY 



A Home School for Boys. Classical, Scientific, 
and Special Courses. Physical and Chemical 
Laboratories. Large Athletic Grounds. Gym- 
nasium. Address, 



John C. Briusmade, Principal, 



Washington, Conn. 



Norwich, 
' Conn. 



NORWICH ART SCHOOL 

Offers the best opportunities for study of Drawing, Painting, 
Design, and Modeling to students of both sexes. Locality re- 
markable for its beauty. School attached to Slater Museum. 
General education may be carried forward in classes of Free 
Academy. A limited number of girls will be received into a 
home where every advantage is found. Two scholarships, 
defra\insr tuition fee, awarded on competition. Graduate 
scholarships in Art League, New Yo«k, and School of Drawiug 
and Painting, Boston. For full particulars, address 

OZIAS DODGE, Director. 



Semi-Weekly Courant 

$I.OO a year. Send for Sample Copy. 
Address THE COURANT. Hartford, Ct. 



EDUCATION AL,. 

Our CDwrcb lttu$ic 

would be greatly improved if more 
organists and singers knew of the 
methods pursued at the 

NewEngkuid 

Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 

GEORGE W. CHADWiCK, Musical Director. 
We will send to anyone interested our 
handsome illustrated pamphlet and all 
particulars that may be desired. 

All particulars and Catalogue will he sent by 
TRANK W. HALE, General Manager, Boston, Mass 



Connecticut Literary Institution, 

Boarding Academy for Roys, Nuffield. Conn. 

Classical. Scientific and Academic Courses, 
which prepare thoroughly for any College or Scientific School. 
Discipline kind, yet firm. Environment decidedly Christian, 
and free from city alluements. An ideal school where parents 
may safely intrust their sons, and guardians theirwards. Build- 
ings are heated by steam. Rates vary according to location of 
room. For catalogue or information, address 

Principal H. L. THOMPSON. 



Miss Burbank's Family School S 



for Young 
rls. . . . 



NUMBER COLLEGE PREPARATORY AND 

LIMITED. GENERAL COURSES. 

The plan is to unite a happy home life to careful school routine 
and to add to these a healthful moral training. Situation pleas- 
ant, with appliances (or exercise and recreation. 

PALL TERM OPENS SEPTEMBER, 20. 



7 1 4 Asylum Avenue, 



Hartford, Conn. 



" History of Sharon 

THIRD EDITION. 

Handsomely Illustrated. 



ft 



The Original History by C. F. Sedgwick, A. 

M., with Important Additions and Brought 

Down to Date in Every Particular. Fifteen 

Full Page Views. 



Price, $2.00 per Copy. 

Bound in Full Cloth. 
(Sent post-paid on receipt of price.) 

Address all orders to 

CHARLES WALSH, Publisher, 

AMENIA, N. Y. 



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Fine Resident REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS. Choice^ J>J> 

Property *£ & Building; Sites 

Read "Griffith's Samples" in the daily papers* 

WILLIAM RICHARD GRIFFITH 

*£ Real Estate Broker, ^ 

Courant Building, 66 State St., HARTFORD, CONN. 



Lakevilk, Conn. 



waters afford, 
miles distant. 



Is one of the most beautifully situated towns 
in the state. In the southern extremity of the 
famous Berkshire Hills, on a high table land,, 
sloping to the sparkling waters of Lake Won- 
onscopomoc,^it is not surprising that many peo-' 
pie, wearied of city life, seek rest aud recreation 
in such an ideal spot. The fisherman finds am- 
ple opportunity to display his ability, for there 

LAKE WON3NSCOPOMOC. are f(?w better fighing groundg than the lake 

The mountain scenery is enchanting, Bear mountain, the highest elevation in the state, being only a few 
The roads are well kept, furnishing excellent drives and much variety. 





THE NEW WONONSCO. 



The Summer Visitors 



Find unusually good accommodation at the Wononsco 
House, which is liberally managed to give comfort to 
its patrons. The hotel is open the year round ; is neatly furnished and has every modern 
convenience. As occasional patrons of the Wononsco, it is a pleasure for the publishers 
of The Connecticut Magazine to recommend this hotel even to the most critical of their 
readers. Mr. E. L. Peabody, by close personal attention to the wants of his guests, has 
won for the hotel a reputation that has made it famous throughout this part of the country. 



Flease mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



'- 



3i 



The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. 5. 



September, 1899. 



No. 9. 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



BY MYRON B. BENTON. 






HARON, venerable 
as it is with asso- 
ciations of old New 
England days is yet 
the last town that 
the Colony of Con- 
necticut formed. 
Its first settlement 
was a full century later than those upon 
the Sound and upon the banks of its prin- 
cipal river. 

There is a striking difference between 
the process of settling the country in the 
early period and that of a later day, when 
Progress had donned her Seven League 
Boots. With slow facilities of travel, the 
territory was filled and occupied as the 
wave swept on ; and if the pace was that 
of the ox-team instead of the locomotive, 
there were not lacking advantages in all 
that pertains to the solidification of com- 
munities, and the avoidance of that iso- 
lation which is a potent factor in the ten- 
dency to barbarism. Even so late as 
1 794 there is tradition of a family which 
came to a border town of Sharon, and 



which moved out of one of the old coast 
settlements upon a curious vehicle that an 
ingenious young man of the family had 
constructed — the first wagon ever seen in 
its streets ! 

It thus happened that in October, 1732, 
as we learn from Gen. Sedgwick's invalu- 
able history, a committee appointed by 
the Assembly to " view the colony lands 
west of the Ousatonic River, laid out the 
town of Sharon and marked its bounds by 
sundry piles of stones and the blazing of 
trees. The township was divided into 
fifty-three rights one of which should be 
for the use of the ministiy, one for the 
first gospel minister settled, and one for 
the support of the school. The remaining 
fifty rights were to be u vendered and sold," 
and their purchasers were to have "a sure 
indefeasible estate in fee simple" from his 
majesty, King George the Second — ''in 
fee and common socage, and not in capite 
nor by Knights Service." Earlier than 
this, one Capt. Richard Sackett had 
thought to appropriate to himself a princely 
estate here, through a colonial patent from 



449 



450 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



New York, and purchases from the Indian 
chief, Metoxen, some 22,000 acres in the 
two states — but his scheme, most fortu- 
nately, ended in failure. There is how- 
ever nothing recorded of him specially- 
dishonorable ; he was but availing himself 
of methods in securing a fortune, then, as 
still, in high repute. 




.% - : M ■'■'■ : ^v ; v :;% ' 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 
Built in 1824. 

Sharon was known only by the cabalis- 
tic name of "N. S." — so it was designated 
in the committee's report to the Assembly ; 
but when the first body of settlers came, in 
1739, they sent a petition "To the Honor- 
able, the Governor and Representatives in 
General Court assembled at New Haven," 
stating that their township they had 
"presumed to call by the name of Sharon." 
If "a rose by any other name would smell 



as sweet," it is still hard to believe that 
there would not be some alien flavor to 
even so delectable a spot, had it retained 
permanently the uncouth designation of 
"N. S." for a name. But the petition was 
granted and henceforth this wild rose of 
Sharon had its fragrant and appropriate 
name. 

There was nothing 
of haphazard in the 
Puritan's way of 
founding a settle- 
| ment. He had a 
genius for organiza- 
tion, and he came 
with institutions, civil 
and religious, already 
perfected ; there was 
only to set them up 
at first, and town and 
parish were in work- 
ing order. So the 
founders immediately 
laid out the tradi- 
tional village street 
with a meeting house 
in the center of the 
green, as instinctively 
as a colony of bees 
constructs a comb. 
The surveyors did 
not end their work, 
indeed, until they 
had covered that part 
of the township with 
a right-angled net- 
work of highways, many of them on all 
manner of impossible grades. It would 
seem that their ideal plan must be carried 
out, despite the incorrigibility of the 
geological formation. 

" The Sharon fathers, we may suppose, 
paused upon the New England border — 
the Ultima Thule of civilization to them " 
— says a local chronicler of this region, 
"and from their vantage ground of the hill, 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



45i 



peered over into the sister state with 
mingled feelings of curiosity and disap- 
proval. They must have pondered gravely 
on the mysterious ways of their neighbors 
in the Province of Amenia, N. Y. ; for 
here they met abruptly a wave of emigra- 
tion which had flowed in a 
direction opposite to their 
own, from the banks of the A 

Hudson. They were the 
people whom D i e d r i c h 
Knickerbocker long ago 
portrayed in his renowned 
' History of New York' — a 
people differing in language, 
customs and all their social 
traditions from the New \? 

England type. Germans and 
Hollanders, including their 
foster brethren, Huguenots, 
had been already established 
for fifteen or twenty years in 
'The Oblong,' as that strip 
of territory, fifty miles long 
and less than two miles wide, 
which had been ceded by 
Connecticut to New York in 
1 731, in exchange for the 
' Horseneck ' on the Sound,' 
was called in those days : or 
' The Equivalent,' as we see 
it in land titles of the period. 
" ' What manner of man is 
this Dutchman? ' we imagine 
their exclaiming, ' He can 
build for himself substantial 
houses, indeed, of brick and 
of stone, with deep shady 
stoups, and with name and 
date inscribed upon them ; 
sometimes with huge initials and figures 
fantastically wrought into the masonry of 
a whole quaint gable ; but his roads are 
devious, wandering trails in the footsteps 
of the Indians. Where is his organic 
town development? There is not a 



meeting house or even a village green in 
the whole settlement ! ' " 

"It was a piece of the irony of fate," 
continues our chronicler, " that the very 
first white man to live in the town of 
Sharon was a Dutchman ! This was one 

"'BY IT I 3 EXCFLLENCV 

GEO R G E W ASH] N G T ON, E s q_; 

General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the 
United States of America. 



1 



HESEaretoCERTIFY that the Bearer hereof 



/%****&*>£ &-0'<^— /^ 



x\i*J& 



/ 



Regiment, having faithful* 



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ly ferved the United Stats; A 

.. /f /y"/P& c - — f an ^ being inhfted for the War only, il 
hereby Discharged from the American Array, 

G I V E N at H e a d - Q u a r t e r s dfcj^^*/ 



*C 






y/^rX. 






His E x c e l l e k c y'» 
Command, 



REGISTER ElJ 

___ pf the Re?':m;nt» 



the Books 



e 



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Adjutant, 



.-.-^•^ 



THE abov« ^^'- ~ * ^ ^ 
hat been honored with the Badge of Merit (at iA/C- 
Years faithful Service. ?t)^/y ■///(*( ' 

DISCHARGE OF HEZEKIAH GOODWIN. 

Baltus Lott— Dutchiest of the Dutch, it 
would appear. The offence of his intru- 
sion, and his profaning with his outlandish 
gibberish the sacred precincts of a Puritan 
settlement, were not without some pallia- 
tion, for the state boundary was not clearly 



45 2 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



defined when he settled in what is now the 
little village of Sharon Valley ; but Baltus 
Lott proved a stubborn interloper, and 
resisted successfully for several years all 
efforts to dislodge him. He finally ex- 



quality in this outpost of New England 
people who had suddenly become their 
neighbors with which they were powerless 
to ♦cope. There was a leaven at work 
which was altogether too lively for the 




clock tower. 

Memorial to Mrs. Emily Butler Ogden Wheeler. 



acted a snug bonus for his squatter rights, 
and took himself off. It was well to be 
rid of him at any price ! 

" Though the Dutch had the advantage 
of earlier establishment, there was some 



narrow rim of Connecticut ; and within a 
very few years after the settlement of 
Sharon in 1739 this element poured in a 
tidal wave over the borders, and the 
Dutchman of the Webutuck Valley awoke 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



453 



one day to find himself a Yankee — lan- 
guage and all ! " 

There is the record, all too familiar in 
New England annals, of trials and disas- 
ters in the first years of settlement. Very 
early there was the visitation of a ix^ste- 
rious " wasting sickness," or " nervous 
fever," of which many died, and which 
nearly ruined the whole enterprise. But 
this band of hardy men and their families 
had come to " undergo the difficulties of 
settling a wilderness country,"— to use the 
phrase of one of 
their petitions to the 
colonial government 
— and they met all 
hardships bravely, 
and went forward to 
success. 

Doubtless in these 
early communities 
there was the full 
average of enjoyment 
and happiness, com- 
paring them with 
vastly different con- 
ditions in modern 
times. Our vision of 
the old days in New 
England is apt to 
have a certain somber 
cast. If there seemed 
to be a twilight overspreading the land, as 
Thoreau says, and an allusion to the sun 
shining, in some account of the time, he 
says, gave a certain sensation of surprise, 
this is doubtless owing, more than other- 
wise, to some obscure association which 
the remoteness of a scene brings to our 
minds. There is ample evidence, despite 
some plausible showing to the contrary, 
that those little communities of the early 
Puritan days took life with zest and enjoy- 
ment. There was with them an existence 
of strenuous and hopeful endeavor, which? 
of itself, brings it rich rewards. Their days 



were lit by ever fresh expectation. Cer- 
tainly a race of pessimists never subdued 
a country as New England was subdued. 
The day of flippant literature, at least, had 
not arrived ; and probably an extreme in 
the opposite direction is the main thing 
which has contributed to deceive us — an 
unnatural solemnity being judged by them 
the only appropriate form for anything 
attaining to the dignity of print. Even 
formal documents, however, occasionally 
break through the stricture. For instance, 




CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, BTJII/T IN 1813, AND RECTORY 



in the records of the first town meeting in 
Sharon, ". To chuse town officers which 
Being Dune the Inhabitance being met on 
the nth day of December, In ye year 
1739," can we believe that no joke was 
intended when " Nathl Skinner Jun Was 
Chosen Leather Sealer?" ; or that, when it 
was"farther voted that Swin haven aRing in 
their Noses shall be accounted an orderly 
Creater," it was soberly adjudged by the 
"inhabitance" that these bejeweled citi- 
zens were welcome attractions in the 
village, running at large? 

The first meeting house was a tempo- 



454 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



rary structure of logs ] but so early as the 
third year a permanent building was 
erected. There have been few pastorates 
in Connecticut more memorable than that 
of the Rev. Cotton Mather Smith, whose 
ministry in Sharon began in 1755 and 
continued till his death, in 1806. Parson 
Smith, as he was called, was no less emi- 
nent for his good works than his learning 
and piety. His befriending of orphan 
children with substantial material aid was 
an eloquent preaching, over and above the 



stirring exhortations. He was afterward, 
for a time, a chaplain in the army. 

Adonijah Maxam, who died here in his 
native town in 1850, at the age of 97, 
went through a series of remarkable ad- 
ventures in the Revolutionary War. In 
an attempt on Montreal, under Col. Ethan 
Allen, he was captured with others, in- 
cluding Allen, and sent to England. The 
vicissitudes of his escape, when he was 
brought back to New York, still impris- 
oned, make a thrilling tale. He again 




SHARON INN. 



4000 discourses, besides some 1,500 on 
funeral and other occasions, which one of 
his admirers estimated he had delivered. 
The figures show a memorable achiev- 
ment ; but, when we reflect what a sermon 
was in those days, the vast aggregate is 
not without its appalling aspect. Sharon 
was conspicuous for its fervor of patriotism 
in the Revolution, and it had no citizen 
more ardent or more stalwart than Parson 
Smith. The tidings of Lexington reached 
Sharon just in time for him to announce 
them from the pulpit, which he did with 



joined the army, and, among other expe- 
riences, went through the horrors of the 
winter at Valley Forge. There is one 
tradiiion connected with his adventures, 
on which written history — doubtless from 
a proper sense of dignity — has hitherto 
kept silent. Maxam, it seems, was more 
noted for his patriotism and bravery than 
for his attractions of person. It is even 
hinted that he was the homliest man in 
the State of Connecticut — which is saying 
a great deal ! Be that as it may, the for- 
lorn physical condition to which he was 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



455 



reduced by stress of prolonged imprison- 
ment and neglect was such, it is said, as 
greatly to heighten whatever impression 
his presence made to the eye of the 
observer ; and the story is that his captors 
actually had him exhibited to crowds in 
England, as a specimen of the outlandish 
Yankees — a race of Yahoos — they were 
trying to subdue. 

One memento of the Revo- 
lutionary struggle preserved in 
Sharon is the discharge of 
Hezekiah Goodwin, with the 
signature and seal of Washing- 
ton, under date of June 7, 
1783, after his faithful services 
through the whole war. It is 
kept by his grandson, Mr. 
George D. Goodwin, who now, 
at the age of 86, is one of the 
few left who furnish a link 
with the past of Sharon. 

It is a fact worth recording 
that it is only within two or 
three years that Mr. Goodwin 
has gained possession of this 
heirloom. It had been given 
up as part of the proof neces- 
sary to obtaining a pension 
for the veteran soldier; but, 
that granted, the discharge 
was stubbornly held on to in 
the archives at Washington. 
and now, after the lapse of the 
greater part of a century, it is 
at last in the hands of its 
rightful owner. 

Another interesting document in the 
possession of Mr. Goodwin is the Com- 
mission of Lieut. Col. David Burr, signed 
by Jonathan Trumbull in 1772. 

The stretch of country surrounding 
Sharon, within a radius of a few miles, 
embraces an unusual variety — between 
sylvan pastoral views, which recall Berket 
Foster's English Landscapes, and the 



wildest mountain scenery. The township 
itself is a great rounded upland, with pic- 
turesque peaks and wide outlooks, des- 
cending steeply on the east to the wooded, 
rapid-flowing Housatonic, and on the 
west to the placid meadows of the Webu- 
tuck. In laying'out the town there was 
found no site, even nearly central, for the 
village plot or borough. Tradition still 




■Rimini - 



■ 



£*ite^& 



METHODIST CHURCH. 
Built in 1835. 



points out the upland plateau which the 
settlers first selected. The situation finally 
chosen is upon the extreme western 
border ; and the choice is fortunate, 
except for tne inconvenience of the town- 
ship housekeeping, so to speak, for the 
location has great attractions. To the 
northward,in the distance. are the Taghka- 
nics : and three blue peaks, in a close 



456 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



group to the eye, rise up from their three 
several states — Mount Riga, Mount Ever- 
ett, or the Dome, and Bear Mountain. 
Ray Mountain is in the nearer view, and 
Indian Mountain, with a beautiful lake at 
the foot of its slopes upon each side. 
Silver Lake, or Mudge, if its not very 
euphonious, but historic name, must be 
given, is the only one of the four lakes 
in close vicinity to each other of which 
the aboriginal name is not preserved. 
Wequagnock, on the state border, is 



We may picture to ourselves the Sharon 
of early times, when this wide mountain 
upland lay in its primeval state, and so 
large is the area still covered by forests 
there are many portions which differ little 
from the time when the bear and deer 
roamed through them, and when the 
Indians were warring, hunting and fishing, 
and, at times, castigating their fetish idol 
(kept in charge of an old squaw) when- 
ever it was believed to have brought them 
ill luck in their endeavors. 




SILVER IyAKE. 



Indian Pond from time immemorial ; but 
it was the Gnaden See of the old Mora- 
vians — their "Lake of Grace," for the 
good work they accomplished among the 
Indians here. Their famous mission was 
established in the wilds almost as early as 
the settlement of the town. A monument 
to them and their work adorns the shore 
of the lake. There are many beautiful 
lakes in this vicinity ; but I doubt whether 
there is another, even in the state, which 
can rival the great variety of charm per- 
taining to Wequagnock. 



The same wide, long street remains 
that was laid out in 1739, but there is no 
little change in the aspect of the village 
since the day when it was voted that "Swin 
haven a Ring in their Noses shall be ac- 
counted an orderly Creater" — this shady 
avenue, with its handsome residences, 
and lawns, not left to the clipping of four- 
footed residents. A few of the buildings 
date back within the first quarter-century ; 
but there are elms which the settlers must 
have planted when they first came. Their 
great size we should believe indicated a 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



457 



much greater age, did we not know the 
rapid growth of this species. 

"The elms of Sharon! "exclaims the 
local chronicler, before quoted, "The 
very words bring before the mind's eye 
the typical New England street — that 
long, wide, shady stretch upon which the 
sober, substantial residences front, each 
originally with its 'home-lot' running back 
indefinitely, and with a wood-lot some- 
where in the distant rear ; with its church 



found so great a number around one 
residence as there are in the grounds of 
the Misses Wheeler. It is here that a 
gigantic ash. with its legendary story of 
treaties with the Indians under its shade, 
recently fell from sheer age." 

Within the limits of this paper many a 
point of interest must be passed by — many 
a piquant story of the old town untold ; 
accounts of notable residents (such, for 
instance, as Noah Webster's sojourn in 




THE GOVERNOR SMITH HOUSE. 
Built during the Revolution. 



spires, not now as formerly, rising from 
the green between the branching roadways. 
The puritan was faithful to this attractive 
plan for his village plot, wherever he 
migrated within New England borders ; 
very seldom is there an example outside 
of it. There is the Sterling Elm, pre- 
eminent for size among its fellows ; and 
in those old aristocratic places leading 
southward, there are many noble ancestral 
trees. It is not often that there can be 



early life) ; of its historic dwellings, etc. 
It will not be invidious to single out 
one dwelling as the most noticeable. 
This is the Gov. Smith mansion, which 
stands at the south end of the street. It is a 
noble stone structure, erected during 
the Revolution and of such thorough work- 
manship that the years have made few 
traces upon it. There is a tradition that 
the Italian workmen employed had some 
secret process in tempering their mortar. 



458 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



At any rate, it is a cement which remains 
harder to-day than the stones embedded 
in it. This house is profusely stored with 
ancient memorials — manuscripts,portraits, 
furniture, etc., invaluable not only for the 
historic annals of Sharon, but in a wider 
sense. 



and the first session of Congress in Wash- 
ington ; and he was afterward, successively, 
lieutenant governor and governor of the 
state. If Governor Smith was a prominent 
figure in the early days of the republic, he 
was especially so in the rural community 
of his home, where he kept up a certain 
old-time stateliness 





JOHN COTTON SMITH. 
From a Crayon, by a French Artist, a Refugee in Washington, about 1800 



John Cotton Smith — " the most eminent 
citizen of the town," as our historian calls 
him, was born in 1765, and his life was 
passed here in his native town where he 
died in 1845. His six years in Congress 
began with the first year of the century, 



and ceremony of liv- 
ing. With him, em- 
inent talents were 
enhanced by the 
charm of fine man- 
ners and the courtli- 
ness of his presence. 
A colleague of his in 
the Legislature once 
humorously re- 
marked that he had 
never seen a man 
who could take a 
paper from the table 
and lay it back again 
so handsomely as 
John Cotton Smith. 
It is no exaggeration 
to say that he left a 
tradition of manners 
in his native village, 
the impress of which 
is visible to the pres- 
ent day. 

Gen. Charles F- 
Sedgwick was a man 
whose long life was 
peculiarly identified 
with the town • one 
to whose memory 
Sharon owes a debt 
of lasting gratitude 
in his eighty-seventh 
name distinguished in 
others of the descendants of his grandfather, 
Gen. John Sedgwick, who was a Major in 
the Revolutionary army. He was a grad- 
uate of Williams College, and was early 



He died in 1882, 
year. He bore a 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



459 



admitted to the bar. His " General His- 
tory of the Town of Sharon" was published 
in 1842 ; a w r ork embodying a vast amount 
of patient research, which has had suc- 
cessive editions. 

Many of the oldest houses are trans- 
formed in outward semblance almost 
beyond recognition ; but the house built 
in 1799 by George King, who owned a 
large tract of land in connection with it, 



In the residence of the Rev. Dr. C. C. 
Tiffany is perhaps standing the earliest 
dwelling in Sharon. It is of brick, and 
was built by John Penoyer as the inscrip- 
tion indicates in 1757. 

There are several of the old houses 
which fortunately, retain their original 
features ; like the Pardee House, by the 
" Stone Bridge " ; and the Prindle House, 
a spacious gambrel-roofed dwelling on 




WEOUAGNOCK LAKE. 



is one of those which is as little changed 
as the Governor's. It stands at the head 
of the street, looking down the long vista 
of elms — a quaintly designed brick struct- 
ure, which, with its portraits, and ornate 
furniture, holds much of interest for the 
antiquarian. There are not a few houses 
in Sharon, which there is not space here to 
describe, that are replete with such me- 
mentoes, handed down through many 
generations. 



'"Gay Street" near the charming lakelet, 
which furnishes the natural reservoir for the 
village supply. This hill top suburb per- 
petuates the name of John Gay, one of 
the early settlers of the northern part of 
the town. The Gay House is built of 
rough stone and bears the date of 1765, 
inscribed with the builder's initials on a 
stone high in one of the gables. It is one 
of the most strikingly picturesque monu- 
ments of the old times to be found ; un- 



460 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



changed as it is, with its heavy-timbered 
gambrel roofs, its great stone chimneys 
and deep window-seats. Appropriately, 
its roof-tree is one of the three or four 
finest and largest elms in Sharon. 

Sharon, in recent years, has drawn a 
large number of summer sojourners, who 
find in its health-giving altitude, and the 
charms of its scenery, a potent attraction. 
The Inn, formerly but a type of the 



which Sharon is indebted to the munifi- 
cence of Mrs. Hotchkiss. It was formally 
opened in 1893, and is erected to the 
memory of her husband, the late Benjamin 
Berkley Hotchkiss who was reared in 
Sharon. It is of large capacity, with 
shelving for a library almost beyond the 
dreams of the place. 

Close to the street, but almost entirely 
obscured from observation, the Hillside 





MONUMENT TO MORAVIAN MISSIONARIES TO THE INDIANS AT WEOUAGNOCK TAKE. 



ordinary country hostelry, by large addit- 
ions to its accommodations from year to 
year, gives a summer home to a constantly 
increasing number of guests. There is 
the, so called, improvement of electric 
lights, and the undoubted one of a bountiful 
water supply ; but the trolley device has, 
with commendable promptitude been 
waived aside from desecrating the sylvan 
aisles. 

The Hotchkiss Library is a handsome 
and costly edifice of gray lime-stone, for 



Cemetery opens, near the tasteful Sol- 
diers' Monument ; and, stepping through 
the gateway, one cannot restrain an ex- 
clamation of surprise at the majesty of 
the view of mountain, valley and lake 
suddenly revealed. Here is the silent, 
pensive story of Sharon from the earliest 
to the latest day ! In the older part, 
many are the quaint, sometimes touch- 
ing, and often grotesque epitaphs which 
can with patience be deciphered on the 
mossy tablets of slate — a stone incom- 



THE ROSE OE SHARON. 



461 



parably more dura- 
ble for the purpose 
than marble. But 
the marble monu- 
ments of later times 
have nothing for 
coming generations 
to read beyond 
names and dates. 
Our forefathers did 
not consign their 
loved ones to earth 
without some gra- 
ven tribute of affec- 
tion. There was 
often, doubtless, a 
striking incongruity 

in the lofty virtues ascribed. But not a 
few of these before us have the ring of 
truth ; though they sometimes awaken 
a sense of humor which was not intended. 
There need not, for instance, be inferred 
any lack of conjugal happiness between 
the patriarchal John Gay, who died in 
1792 at the age of 94, and his wife, from 
their epitaph : 

" Here Man and wife, 
Secure from strife, 
Lie slumbering side by side. 





RESIDENCE OF THE LATE GEN. CHARLES F. SEDGWICK 
Built in 1780. 



THE GAY HOUSE- 
Built in 1765. 

Though Death's cold hands 
Dissolved the bands 
It could not them divide." 
For Joseph Launders, one of the early 
settlers who died in 1781. and his wife 
(they attained the age of 94 and 97 years 
respectively), we read : 
" Behold and see this wonder here, 
This couple lived full seventy year 
In wedlock bands, now yield to death, 
Ninety odd years 'tis from their birth." 
And Jonathan Day, interred in 1763, still 
speaks from his 
tomb : 

" Spectators here 
you see 

Exemplify'd in 
me 

What you must 
surely be." 

It seems an odd 
tribute, the one 'Tn 
Memory of Asenath, 
daughter of Capt. 
Thomas, and Wel- 
theon Pardee, who 
Died June 7, 1777, 
in the 19th year of 
her asre. 



462 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 




GEN. CHARLES F. SEDGWICK. 

" Stop at my Tomb 

Youth methinks she criep, 

Turn thou aside 

And ask whose 
Corps here lies 

O Asenaths ! 
Tis your once 
Companion dear. 

My glass has run, 

My Corps is des- 
tined here." 
There is a conversa- 
tional tone about this 
epitaph, with the date 
of 1795 : 

" And who would 
not turn aside (for 
awhile from the most 
favorite amusement) 
and view the place 
where her once lov'd 
Companion lies." 

But leaving reluct- 
antly the mossy an- 
nals of Hillside 
Cemetery with its far 



outlook, we come — upon the large roll- 
ing upland at the southward of the village 
— to another equally extensive and fas- 
cinating view. A chain of most pictur- 
esque mountain peaks (some of them 
the highest altitudes in the region) 
stretches into the blue distance — Cobble 
Mountain, Weputing (the "tooth moun- 
tain" of the Indians, as Mr. Isaac 
Huntting, the historian of "Little Nine 
Partners," has shown), Chestnut Ridge, 
Oblong Mountain, and many others, with 
miles of the luxuriant Webutuck valley at 
their feet. Here are the breezy golf 
links upon one of the hills ; and it is 
here that the enterprise of Mr. Gilbert L. 
Smith has opened a residence park upon 
" Poplar Hill," which in its manifold 
attractions can have few rivals for such 
a purpose in the country. 

Recently, while making repairs in 
'•Century Lodge," a dwelling built in 




THE KING HOUSE. 
Built by George King in 1799. 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



463 




GEORGE KING. 

From a painting by courtesy of his great-grand- 
daughter, Mies Margaret King. 



1795, my attention was attracted by 
some fragments of printed paper behind 
a wall that was torn down. One room, 
it appeared, had not been completed 
when the house was first occupied, and 
the paper had been pasted over the crev- 
ices in the rough planks of the frame — 
to " patch a wall to expel the winter's 
flaw," as Hamlet says — but a few years 
later the room had been finished with 
lath and a coat of plastering. So this 
old paper had been sealed 
and preserved, like a papyrus 
in an Egyptian tomb. What 
was my astonishment to dis- 
cover that it was a newspaper 
published in Sharon in 1800 ! 
The tradition of this enter- 
prise, I was surprised to find, 
has almost perished, and very 
little could be learned regard- 
ing it from the oldest inhabit- 
ants. It is certainly remark- 
able that a weekly paper 
should have been published 
in a village so small and so 
secluded as Sharon was in 



1800. "The Rural Gazette," the project 
of one Elliot Hopkins, was a short-lived 
venture, however. 

It was with a peculiar interest, that I 
pieced the torn fragments together, and 
deciphered as far as possible the contents 
— the successive embedding of paste, 
whitewash and plastering making a diffi- 
cult task. I felt myself suddenly wafted 
back, as if upon the divan of Abushamat, 
into the social circles of the Sharon of a 
hundred years ago ! Here was the most 
vivid touch in the picture — here in the 
advertisements, where the passing wants, 
employments, business troubles, specula- 
tive ventures — even sentiments of the 
little community found frank expression. 
Here were the old names, familiar in the 
present generation : — Prindle, Hitchcock, 
Chapman, St. John, Boland, Knibloe, and 
many more. " A girl weaver," it appears, is 
"wanted immediately to weave upon 
shares ! " it is certain that Joshua Lovell 
is pained by the straying of his choice 
heifers ; on the other hand, Caleb Benton 
has somehow in his possession a two-year 
old colt, which the owner can have by 
paying charges ; there are partnerships 
dissolved ; delinquent debtors threatened ; 
men liable to military duty are warned out 




HOTCHKISS LIBRARY 



32 



464 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 




HISTORIC ASH. 
At "Nequitimaug, 1 ' residence of the Misses Wheeler 

to the training-day parade ; the town 
" listers " publish their roll ; and there is 
even a citizen (whose name fortunately is 
not perpetuated in Sharon), who warns the 
community against trusting his wife, Han- 
nah ; and to add to the indignity, his un- 
savory notice is emblazoned by a cut rep- 
resenting a most forlorn female figure 
trudging forth with a bundle in her hands ! 
But outside the narrow village circle 
there is lively matter in this newspaper 
waif. The political cauldron in the sum- 
mer of 1800 was boiling furiously ; for the 
first real presidential contest of the repub- 
lic was at its height, with Thomas Jeffer- 



son and John Adams 
as the gladiators. A 
newspaper of the day 
may serve, as this 
does, to reflect the 
temper of the time 
and give a touch of 
vitality where mat- 
ters, from their seem- 
ing triviality, are lost 
to the historian. I 
found a rollicking 
campaign song to 
the lilting measure 
of Yankee Doodle, 
which seemed to 
make these moulder- 
ing tatters of print 
fl u 1 1 e r with life. 
There are five, per- 
haps more than five, 
of the stanzas ; for 
the piece can be but 
imperfectly rescued 
from the vicissitudes 
of its century's du- 
rance. I doubt if it is 
otherwise preserved. 
The song gives too 
graphic a picture, 
and is too charac- 
teristic of the initiative of this manner of 
warfare in our country, to be lost. Two 




INTERIOR, " RUSTICANA," COTTAGE) OF 
MISS H. Z. BICKFORD. 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 



465 



stanzas remain nearly complete. 
Then rally strong and * * * 
Their schemes of wicked action ; 
And trample underneath your feet 
The Royal British Faction. 

Yankee Doodle, turn 'em out, 
Places are the dandy, 
What the devil are you 

about ? 
Send us round the Brandy. 
Be staunch and firm on free- 
dom's side, 
And keep a close connection ; 
Let no Aristocrats divide 
Your votes at next election. 
Yankee Doodle keep it up. 
Push about the Brandy, 
Johnny Quincey's out of luck, 
Jefferson's the dandy. 




SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 

later. There are some fragmentary lines 
which cam' the same pungent flavor : 

Look sharp 
at what is 
doing, 

Feds you 
see are 
working ** 

Bring about 
your ruin. 

* * * * 

The cry for 

war has no 
release, 




John of 
Quincy, it 
need hardly 
be said, is 
the mean- 
ing ; for the 
younger 
Adams did 
not enter 
the political 
arena until 
many years 



THE STREET. 



466 



THE ROSE OF SHARON. 




CENTURY I^ODGE. 
Residence of Mr. William Bunker. Built in 1795 by Joel Benton. 



But hot and hotter waxes. 



He that flinches is an ass, 
Jefferson's the Dandy. 
Let it not for a moment be suppossed 
that such banality reflected the sentiments 



of our " Rural Gazette." 
Its columns were soiled 
with it, indeed, only for 
the purpose of showing 
to what a pitch the red- 
republican Jeffersonians 
could descend. Far 
enough was it from such 
ribald breathings, here 
among the cool seques- 
tered shades of conserva- 
tive Sharon, where to be 
respectable, was to be — 
Federalist ! 

At the head of Sharon 
street is the commodious 
Methodist Church, with 
its fine bell ; the pictur- 
esque little Episcopal Church is at the 
southward ; and centrally the Congrega- 
tional, near the site of the little log meet- 
ing-house of 1 741. All are substantial 
buildings of brick. The latter, built in 
1824, on the stereotype New England 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WIEUAM OGDEN WHEELER. 



OUR LIFE. 



467 



pattern, with 
three vestibule 
doors, had, 
aforetime, i t s 
clock, and 
there is a 
legend that the 
great dials are 
still upon the 
tower, con- 
cealed by mod- 
ern carpentry. 
But time is 
measured now 
for the country 
round by the 

fine clock erected in 1884 to the memory 
of Mrs. Emily Butler Ogden Wheeler. It 
is rarely indeed that any place has the 
boon of an architectural structure so 



* 






1 






•^*h 


j 


w. 






Wx 1 








1 




;^w 







QUEEN MARGARET'S ETM. 



satisfactory — so truly " a thing of beauty" 
— as this noble stone tower with its great 
melodious bell. Its legend inscribed 
reads : 



" Hours are golden links ; God's token 
Reaching Heaven ; but one by one 
Take them lest the chain be broken 
Ere the pilgrimage be done." 



OUR LIFE. 



BY BERT F. CASE. 



Our Life, what is it but a slender stream 

That widens to the sea. In clear air 

Its springs are mountain born ; its waters gleam 

Thro' Youth's glad Summer-land, — and yet not there 

Is its true meaning found. Nor yet beside 
Its broader, deeper wave doth aught reveal 
The moving Mystery. Still the seaward tide 
Rolls on — more slowly — till one day we feel 



The nearness of the Sea. Along its marge, 
A voice of welcome runs. And now at last 
Into the Deep of Deeps our phantom barge 
Hath borne us. — Is the Mystery past? 



A PASTOR OF THE CHURCH MILITANT. 



BY FREDERICK E NORTON, 



IN the cemetery in the town of Branford, 
Connecticut, one may still find a 
monument bearing this inscription : " Be- 
neath this monument are deposited the 
remains of the Rev'd Philemon Robbins, 
A.M., Pastor of the First Church of Christ 
in Branford, and his pious Consort, Mrs. 
Hannah Robbins. They fell asleep in 
Christ after a life of eminent usefulness in 
their stations. The former on August 13, 
1 781, in the 72nd year of his life and the 
49th of his Ministry. The latter on June 
17, 1776, in the 63rd year of her age." 

Philemon Robbins, whose useful career 
is thus commemorated, was born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., and educated at Harvard 
College. Late in 1732 he visited Yale 
College and while there he received an 
invitation to preach the following Sunday 
for the Church at Branford. The pious 
people of Branford were so well pleased 
with the young candidate that they gave 
him a call, offering him a salary of 130 
pounds. This call was accepted, Mr. 
Robbins writing that he had thought de- 
liberately and impartially thereon, and the 
date of ordination fixed for February 7, 

!733- 

The people soon became much attached 
to their young shepherd, who in 1736 
married Hannah Foote, daughter of one 
of the first families of the town. 

A year or two of quiet life and then 
came that spiritual whirlwind, "the " Great 
Awakening." This enveloped the Rever- 
end Philemon Robbins and for nearly ten 
years he saw much strife. His moral fibre 
468 



was tried to the uttermost, the daily bread 
due himself and his family came near be- 
ing taken from him, and the manner of it 
was in this wise. 

The great revival was a strange thing to 
the New England Clergy, something hard 
to be understood. Living too early to 
dispose of the matter by calling it a men- 
tal disorder they were, after the custom of 
their time, suspicious that the awakening 
might in some way be invested by Satan to 
his advantage. Most of all did they object 
to the travelling preacher who went about 
reaping where he had not sown, and in 
Mr. Davenport's case at least, more blessed 
in lungs than brains. To counteract this 
evil the General Assembly in 1742 passed 
an act providing that any regularly or- 
dained minister who preached in the 
parish of any Clergyman without the latters 
consent should forfeit the legal right to 
collect his salary, while the unlicensed and 
unordained man who should venture to 
teach, preach or exhort was liable to be 
summarily sent out of the Colony as a 
vagrant. This drastic measure originated 
directly or indirectly with the clergy of 
New Haven County, and had been ap- 
proved by a council in Guilford, in 1741. 

Brother Whittlesey, of Wallingford, did 
not approve of the new movement, and 
when a little band of Baptists in his parish 
desired that he should preach a sermon 
to them, he met them with a curt refusal. 
After some consultation the little band 
sent the following quaint letter to Mr. 
Robbins at Branford. 



A PASTOR OF THE CHURCH MILITANT. 



469 



" Sir: — After suitable respects to your- 
self, this note is to inform you that Mr. 
Bellamy has been with us at Wallingford 
and preached in our Baptist society to our 
very good satisfaction and success, on sev- 
eral persons both of our own people and 
also those of your denomination, with 
whom we desire to join heartily in the in- 
ternals of religion, tho' we can't in form; 
so that it seems to be the desire of both 
denominations here, that yourself would 
oblige us with a sermon or two as soon as 
you can after next week : And please send 
me when. This is also my desire for the 
good of souls and the glory of God. 
Sir : Yours in good affection, 

John Mkrriman, Elder. 
Wai/cingford, Dec. 23, 1741. 

After Mr. Robbins had given the matter 
due consideration, he accepted the invita- 
tion and agreed to preach in Wallingford 
on Jan. 6, 1742. On Jan. 5th, he was 
given two letters requesting him not to 
preach for the Baptists ; one signed by two 
or more members of the Congregational 
Church at Wallingford, and the other by 
the Rev. Messrs. Styles and Hemingway. 
He evidently saw no reason why he should 
change his decision, and accordingly 
preached twice to the Baptists, meeting 
large congregations. This was enough 
and more than enough for the Congrega- 
tional brethren, and on Feb. 9th a formal 
complaint was presented to the Consocia- 
tion at New Haven, charging Mr. Robbins 
with preaching in a disorderly manner in 
the First Society of Wallingford, without 
the consent of the Rev. Mr. Whittlesey, 
and contrary to the act of the Guilford 
Council, contrary to the act of the Conso- 
ciation and contrary to the desire of two 
neighboring Ministers and to a great 
number of church members of Wallingford. 

This theological fire alarm, signed by 
Theophilus Yale, was answered by Mr. 
Robbins who pleaded that he knew noth- 
ing of the resolutions of the Guilford 
Council ; that they had not been adopted 



by the Consociation ■ that he had not en- 
tered into Mr. Whittlesey's parish, but 
had preached to a congregation already 
recognized as a separate body by the 
government of Connecticut; and lastly, 
that he " knew of no rule in the word of 
God or the Saybrook Platform " which 
obliged him to comply with their desires 
in his preaching ; nor could he see any 
reason in such desire. 

The Consociation was not of Mr. Rob- 
bins' mind in the matter, and resolved 
that his conduct had been disorderly and 
that " he should not sit as a member of 
this Council for his disorderly preaching." 

After his reading of this resolution, the 
Rev. Philemon returned to Branford, sup- 
posing the matter at an end ; but in May, 
1743, further complaints were brought 
against him to the Association, signed by 
six disaffected brethren of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Branford. The charges 
were unimportant in character, and were 
never directly communicated to Mr. Rob- 
bins, though the Association appointed a 
committee to go to Branford and investi- 
gate the matter. Upon learning of this 
action, Mr. Robbins met his complaining 
townsmen, Messrs. Hoadly, Plant, Frisby, 
Rogers and Baldwin, with the result that 
they informed the Association that their 
grievance had been remedied and that 
they were in good agreement and union. 
Hoadly, et a/, found it one thing to enter 
a complaint and another to withdraw it, 
as the committee of clergymen met and 
drew up articles of advice to Mr. Robbins. 
The latter then endeavored to attend the 
next meeting of the Association at North 
Haven only to find himself confronted 
with a document in which he was asked 
to acknowledge thathis preaching at Wal- 
lingford was a disorderly act, and to pro- 
mise to give no further cause of offense. 

To this he would not subscribe and of- 
fered one of his own which was rejected 



470 



A PASTOR OF THE CHURCH MILITANT. 



in its turn, ending the matter for that year. 
In 1744 he came before the Consociation 
with three distinct acknowledgments but 
in these he failed to admit that he had 
committed any fault in ministering to the 
Baptists. His overtures were once more 
rejected and in 1745 another complaint 
was given the Consociation from the dis- 
affected minority in the Branford Church, 
with the result that one more council was 
held in that long-suffering town, which 
came to nothing as usual. In September 
of that year Mr. Robbins went to Water- 
bury and presented one more confession 
in which he stated that " he could not 
after more than three years study, medi- 
tation, and prayer for light in the matter, 
be convinced that my so preaching was 
contrary to the holy scriptures or the 
mind of God." He was perfectly willing 
to admit that his action was against the 
wishes of Mr. Whittlesey and the desire 
and advice of two ministers and a consid- 
erable number of church members in 
Wallingford ; closing his confession with 
an appeal for forgiveness not so much for 
his own sake as for the flock in Branford. 
This was not at all to the Consociation's 
mind, and the confession was never given 
a second reading. 

The result of this action had its effect 
on the flock at Branford and they resolved 
among other things on October 21, 1745, 
"That what our pastor has offered in 
relation to his preaching to the baptists at 
Wallingford is sufficient. That this society 
desire the Rev. Mr. Robbins to continue 
in the ministry among us," and " that a 
particular people have a right to choose 
their own minister and that no authority 
has a right to censure, suspend or depose 
a minister regularly ordained without the 
vote or consent of his people." This 
action was distasteful to the minority and 
they made more appeals to the Consocia- 
tion and, in 1 746, that body once more 



summoned Mr. Robbins to appear before 
a council. Had that gentleman imagined 
that he had committed the crime of the 
century he would have been excusable, for 
he now stood accused under no less than 
twenty different charges, of which he was 
once more found guilty in an ex parte 
hearing and deposed. 

This action, like the Lord Cardinal's 
curse in Barham's poem " Gave rise to no 
little surprise, as nobody seemed one penny 
the worse." 

Mr. Robbins officiated the following 
Sunday as usual preaching from the text 
" Woe is me if I preach not the gospel," 
and once more the society upheld him, 
advancing his salary. 

The novelist and historian alike have 
done honor to the pastor for his stand in 
behalf of christian brotherhood ; it is time 
a word was said for the men and women 
of his congregation who made his action 
possible. That a pastor might be found 
who was in advance of his age, was not 
so remarkable as that a congregation was 
found willing to suffer many things in 
sustaining him. The action of the Con- 
sociation meant a great deal to them, and 
that they clung to Philemon Robbins 
through good report and evil report should 
be enough to entitle them to respect and 
praise. There remained for Mr. Robbins' 
opponents the appeal unto Caesar. This 
was taken in May 1748, asking the 
General Assembly to come to the relief of 
the Branford minority. A legislative 
committee was appointed to investigate 
the matter, with the result that another 
council was advised. This never met and 
now, six years after the delivery of the 
Wallingford sermons, peace was in sight. 
Mr. Robbins faithfully attended to his 
work in Branford, and in 1755 the Con- 
sociation so far receded from its former 
attitude as to invite him to be present at 
the ordination of a minister at East Haven. 



A PASTOR OF THE CHURCH MILITANT. 



47i 



This invitation was accepted and from 
henceforth he regularly attended the 
meetings of his brethren. 

The fierce heat of the seven years 
controversy had welded together pastor 
and people, the last sermon delivered by 
Mr. Robbins being to his flock in Bran- 
ford on August 12, 1 781. After dinner 
the next day he sat at his open door 
smoking his pipe ; his wife going to him 
a little later found him dead. It was said 
of Mr. Robbins not many years ago by 
one of his successors, who has since joined 
him, that the controversy injured his 
circumstances as it deprived him of a part 
of his income and subjected him to great 
expense and anxiety. The anxiety and 
expense were undoubtedly real yet he was 
fairly well provided with this world's 
goods. 

It was the writer's good fortune to 
discover not long ago the will and dis- 
tribution of estate of Mr. Robbins, from 
which document one may find proof that 
he was at least as well-to-do as most people 
of his day. The will, a holographic docu- 
ment -over date of May 5, 1778, divides 
the property between two sons, Chandler 



and Ammi Ruhamah Robbins, and four 
daughters, Hannah, Sarah, Rebecca and 
Irene, each being married. To his 
daughter Sarah he leaves his " silver 
tankard," to his daughter Hannah his 
"silver cup," and " to my daughter 
Rebecca H. Gould my silver pepper box, 
in testimony of my love to them and 
agreeable to yr late Mother's Desire." 
According to the division Mr. Robbins' 
household goods were valued at 56 
pounds, while there is also a comfortable 
mention of notes and bills due the estate. 
He owned " a wharf, a portion of meadow 
below Peter's bridge," and three separate 
portions of real estate near the center of 
the town of Branford. Two sons had 
been educated at Yale and a third died 
there an undergraduate, and his first wife 
having died he had married a second. 
His sons were both clergymen, Ammi 
settling in Norfolk, Conn, where his de- 
scendants now do honor to their ancestry 
and keep green the grave of their fore- 
father Philemon, whose bones lie, as is 
meet, in the town where he suffered and 
triumphed and where he was indeed a light 
of the world in his day and generation. 




AN ANCIENT SCHOOL-DAME. 



BY EMILY S. GILMAN. 



EARLY in this century, a young girl 
living at Norwich, Conn., in the 
Falls neighborhood, close by the paper- 
mill bridge, was unexpectedly summoned 
to fill the place of a teacher who had been 
called away. To the committee men who 
came for her, she modestly replied that 
she was only fourteen, but they were quite 
sure that she was old enough and knew 
enough to take the school for a few weeks. 
What school it was, whether in the brick 
school-house where she afterwards taught 
for years, or in a small building that once 
stood north of the residence of Mrs. 
L. F. S. Foster, does not appear, but we 
know that it was Miss Sally Goodell who 
thus began what proved to be her life 
work. 

Miss Goodell died Feb. 4, 1879, lacking 
but a few days of the age of 87 years. It 
is said that she did not give up teaching 
finally until she was 80. so that she had 
taught more than sixty years, and her 
pupils must have numbered more than 
five hundred, representing most of the 
families about town, even down 
as far as Chelsea Parade. Often a 
whole family of boys and girls, half 
a dozen of them, came to her school 
one after the other, and in several instan- 
ces, the children of her early pupils came 
to be under her instruction. An especially 
noteworthy fact is that both Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin Huntington, all their children, 
and one or more of their grandchildren, 
were pupils of Miss Goodell. 



There are still preserved four little 
manuscript books in which Miss Goodell 
recorded the names of her scholars for a 
period of thirty five years. A goodly list 
indeed, including many familiar names, 
Arms, Bliss, Coit, Everest, Gilman, Har- 
land, Havens, Huntington, Lathrop, Mit- 
chell, Perkins, Stedman, Strong, and many 
more. And it is pleasant to remember 
that many of these boys and girls have 
made their mark in the world as useful 
men and women ; clergymen, foreign 
missionaries, lawyers, men of letters, a 
Judge in the United States Circuit Court, 
a Brigadier-General, and men of affairs, 
among them. 

No attempt has ever been made to bring 
them together to pay a tribute to the 
memory of their teacher, but the reminis- 
cences of pupils of various periods will 
help us to form definite impressions of 
Miss Goodell and her school. 

She was herself a pupil of Miss Mary 
Marsh who taught school for several years 
in Norwich Town, in a small building, no 
longer standing, near the Havens house 
now owned by Mrs. Henry Potter. After 
Miss Marsh married and removed from 
Norwich to Utica in 181 1, Mrs. Thomas 
Lathrop was interested in having another 
private school opened in the neighbor- 
hood, to which she might send two little 
girls in her own family. She persuaded 
Miss Goodell to come uptown and teach. 
The school was opened in the Adgate 
house, no longer standing, and at first the 



472 



AN ANCIENT SCHOOL-DAME. 



473 



sessions were held in the front room, but 
later in the room looking west, so much 
pleasanter with its broad outlook over the 
meadows. 

Charles Stedman was probably the only 
boy in the school at this time — a delicate, 
pretty little fellow, and, of course, quite a 
pet. Even in this little school the excite- 
ment of going to the head of the class was 
not wanting, and the gleeful cry is still re- 
membered, " Little Charley Stedman has 
got above big Sally Bliss." Lois Lee 
(Mrs. Sargent), Cornelia Lathrop (Mrs. 
Willis), Mary Bill (Mrs. Jones), and 
Hannah Lathrop (Mrs. Ripley) were 
also among the scholars. 

Miss Goodell continued to live at the 
Falls, and brought her dinner for the short 
nooning. But one happy day the storm 
was too severe for the teacher to come, 
but not too severe for the pupils all to 
gather with their dinner baskets. Such a 
good merry time as they all had, with no 
teacher, a whole house at their disposal, 
and liberty to stay all day. Every part 
of the house was explored, even the cellar, 
though to venture there called for some 
courage, but, once gained, it proved a 
delightful place, with its door opening 
upon the yard below. 

How long this school was continued 
does not appear, but the names of some 
of these early scholars are to be found in 
Miss Goodell's records already mentioned. 
Her first entry is " Began school on my 
own account, July 14, 181 7," and we find 
mentioned the payment of rent, $3.00 a 
quarter to Mrs. L'Hommedieu, for more 
than three years. This was for a room in 
a red building, on the present grounds of 
the W. W. Backus Hospital, nearly oppo- 
site Mr. Joseph Strong's barn which stood 
at the foot of his garden. The building 
was used as a workshop, and the school 
room was over the shop. There was a 



dark closet under the stairs, used as a 
place of punishment. 

The school term opened with 13 schol- 
ars, and the number increased to 25. Tn 
the winter she paid stove rent and wood 
bill, together amounting to $3.50. 

November 6, 1820 she taught in Miss 
Harland's shop, here she paid $2.00 a 
quarter rent. " The entrance was through 
the court or yard of the Harland house 
and beyond the school house was the 
Throop homestead, and the brick school 
house at that time used as a public school, 
Miss Goodell's little scholars looking 
askance at the big town boys who went 
there." Among the pupils here were 
Donald G. Mitchell and his brother and 
sisters, and the children of Mr. Charles P. 
Huntington, Benjamin F., James M., Ruth 
L., (Mrs. Ripley) and William Henry, 
who lived for many years in Paris. Of the 
latter Mr. Mitchell says " Of associates on 
those school benches I remember with 
most distinctness a tallish boy, my senior 
by two years or so, who befriended me in 
many skirmishes, decoyed me often into 
his leafy door yard, half way to my home, 
where luscious cherries grew, and by a 
hundred kindly offices during many suc- 
ceeding years cemented a friendship of 
which I have been always proud." 

In 1824 the Goodell family removed 
from the Falls to the house opposite the 
Harlands, and the next spring the school 
was moved to that house, but the following 
year it was again located in Miss Harland's 
shop. 

In 1830 we find it transferred to the 
brick school house where it continued for 
four years, the next move being across 
the street to Mrs. Pierce's house (the Rums 
Huntington house), where Gager's store 
now stands. There was a dark closet here 
also, and a very high narrow shelf over 
the fire place where sometimes the 
naughty children were seated. They 



474 



AN ANCIENT SCHOOL-DAME. 



were afraid to move lest they should fall, 
and probably dreaded this more than any 
other discipline. One boy reported being 
put into the stove for some misdemeanor. 
Probably in summer ! 

It was in May, 1836, that Miss Goodell 
says "Moved my school to my new school 
house," which many remember as an old 
unpainted building on the corner of the 
Goodell lot, standing flush to the street, 
with the door facing to the south. One 
of her scholars thus describes it "The 
little old school house was innocent of 
paint, both outside and inside. Around 
the wall was a row of desks, made so that 
as the scholars faced inward, their backs 
would come against the sharp edge of the 
desks. In front, near the stove, were the 
small straight backed benches for the 
little tots, among whom I was reckoned. 

" Miss Goodell was old fashioned in her 
ways of teaching, and believed in the 
punctuating power of the rod or ferule. I 
remember distinctly the last day of my 
stay at her seminary. I had an imperfect 
lesson in Olney's Geography, and she im- 
pressed the truth on my hand in scarlet 
lines that made me talk pretty hard when 
outside the building. I declared aloud 
that I was not going to old Sally GoodelPs 
school any more. And on reaching home 
I represented the case to my father, and I 
was sent to the Academy, on opening of 
the next term. The building stood, as we 
know, on the street almost opposite Gen. 
Harland's front door. We used to slide 
down hill from the doorway into her yard, 
and occasionally she would give us a 
doughnut or other notion. She has gone 
I trust, where all good schoolma'ams go. 
The elderly lady's face was not attractive 
to the scholars, but that may not have 
been her fault entirely." 

Another boy writes " I remember the 
long dark entry in which our overcoats 
and caps were hung, the little square 



school room with the box stove in the 
centre, the platform occupied by the desk 
and chair of the presiding genius of the 
room, and the pail of water for the thirsty 
children which stood near the door. A 
vision of a dunce-block and cap also rises 
before my memory, but so vaguely that I 
think they must have been just then pass- 
ing away. At all events I would not have 
it understood that I have any experimen- 
tal knowledge of them. 

"The discipline of Miss Goodell's school 
was kind, but uncompromising. All the 
old pi " yils I am sure, must remember the 
slate lying upon the desk, on which the 
names of the children were newly written 
each morning, so that opposite them 
might be placed the marks for violations 
of the rules and for excellence or defects 
in recitations (known as debits and 
credits.) One method of punishment, I 
am sorry to say, was a gentle rap of Miss 
Goodell's thimble on the head, accom- 
panied by the remark, " Henry go to 
studying," " Benjamin, attend to your 
book," or "Webster, were you whisper- 
ing?" The birch rod too, had not then 
gone out of fashion, but was in pickle for 
more serious offenders. Most of us, I 
fancy, had some slight taste of its quality 
upon our shoulders. Once in a while, 
punishment assumed a dramatic form, — 
the blows of the rod reciprocated by 
vigorous screaming and pulling of spec- 
tacles and hair. It is safe to say that 
Miss Goodell came off victorious. Battles 
in that schoolroom had only one issue. 

" I wish I could recall more distinctly 
what we used to play at recess. I re- 
member that at certain times of the year, 
the first thing was to rush down the hill to 
the pear tree which grew in the garden, 
just on the edge of the yard. We could 
have the pears which fell in the yard, but 
the garden was forbidden ground. The 
pears were very good. I can taste them 



AN ANCIENT SCHOOL-DAME. 



47 S 



now. One of our favorite resorts at recess 
was under the great pine tree which stood 
in the lane. I wish the noble tree had 
never been cut down, but still stood in its 
picturesqueness." 

It does not appear when Miss Goodell 
decided to give up her school, but it must 
have been a deliberate step. The little 
building which had stood for more than 
sixteen years on the corner of the lot was 
moved away, and Miss Goodell retired to 
enjoy a well earned vacation. Perhaps 
this was in 1852, when her record book 
No. 4, ends. It was not very long how- 
ever before she was persuaded to resume 
her work and for a number of years she 
taught a class of little children in the 
brick school house. One small boy who 
came for a half day as a visitor, enjoyed 
the experience so well, that he staid for 
two or three years as a regular pupil. 
Hearing that another boy not far from his 
own age living down town, had gone to 
the Free Academy as a visitor, he ex- 
claimed " I don't see how Malcolm could 
get in at the Academy. He has never 
been to Miss Goodell's school." 

When Miss Goodell finally closed her 
school about 1872, there were but three 
scholars. 

Her charges for tuition for a number of 
years were $3.00 a quarter, withaflro rata 
charge for fuel in the winter season. This 
seems to have been an advance from the 
amount charged seventy years ago, if we 
may judge from the entry Dec. 22, 1823. 
" Received from Mrs. Wait 46 cents, for 
C. R.'s schooling." Charlotte Richards 
had been in attendance just two months. 

There is probably no likeness of Miss 
Goodell in existence, but there are those 
who remember her erect prim figure, 
seventy-five years ago, "very stiff and 
prim even as a young woman, but with a 
pleasant gleam in her blue eyes when they 
were good children, and a severe expres- 



sion on her lips when their conduct was less 
satisfactory." And a pupil of later date 
says " It seems strange to write of the 
dear withered old woman as young. I 
never thought of her as ever having been 
youthful. I recall the little unplastered 
school house with the entry next the street, 
where we used to hang our caps on wooden 
pegs, and the little platform on the west 
side of the room, where Miss Goodell 
always sat in an oak seated chair, the 
back of which was made of hickory and 
painted green. She always wore a knit- 
ting sheath, and seemed to be always knit- 
ting woolen stockings, the most of which, 
I think, my father bought for himself and 
his large family." 

" She sat erect, so that there was always 
space between her body and the back of 
the chair." The big writing desk, beneath 
the lid of which an obstreperous boy was 
once shut for punishment, upon which 
lay the slate, the red ruler, the piece ol an 
old rubber ball treasured for use as an 
eraser, and the school bell, all are accesso- 
ries to the picture. At any rate, in later 
years, she is described as coming to 
school, watch in hand, looking at it lest 
she should be late, — a watch which has 
since been presented to Ex-President 
Cleveland because made by his grand- 
father." 

Some of the text books used were 
Webster's Spelling Book, Woodbridge's 
Geography, followed by Olney's and again 
by Mitchell's ; Peter Parley's History, 
Colburn's Arithmetic, and the New Eng- 
land Primer. There was no school Satur- 
day afternoon, but the morning exercises 
that day were somewhat varied, including 
miscellaneous Bible questions, the Roman 
numerals, and the Westminster Shorter 
Catechism. "The distinct round hand in 
which she wrote the lines at the top of the 
copy books, ought to have guided all into 
a handwriting, legible if not handsome." 



476 



AN ANCIENT SCHOOL-DAME. 



"Her prime force was lavished on spelling. 
We had field days in that, for which we 
were marshaled in companies, toeing a 
crack in the oaken floor. What an ad- 
miring gaze I lifted up upon the tall 
fellows who went with a wondrous glibness 
through the intricacies of such words as 
im-prac-ti-ca-bil-i-ty." 

Sewing and knitting were taught as a 
matter of course to both boys and girls. 
The girls wrought samplers in cross stitch, 
and worked their own initials on the mit- 
tens which they had knit. In a Massa- 
chusetts parsonage, the minister still 
cherishes a trophy of his own handiwork 
in the shape of a patchwork quilt. 

Some of the wee children are enrolled 
as ABC scholars, and at least one of them 
was provided by his mother with a pillow 
for his daily naps, until she learned that 
the pillow case was used to envelop 
naughty boys and girls. "Another method 
of subduing masculine revolt was in tieing 
a girl's bonnet upon a boy's head," and, 
after sixty years, one of those boys wrote 
" I have a lingering sense of some such 
early chastisement, and the wearisome 
pasteboard stiffness and odors of cosmetics 
of the bonnet." Such a punishment 
worked both ways, for one of the girls of 
a less remote period tells what a trial it was 
to her to see her nice new yellow sunbonnet 
put upon a boy's head ! Sometimes too, 
as a punishment, the boys were made to 
sit on the girls' side of the room, and one 
boy well remembers being required to 
scrub the floor where an ink bottle had 
fallen and rolled across the room. 

It is said that unruly children were 
sometimes hung up on the wall, a stout 
band passed around the waist, and again, 
city children passing the door at recess, 
listened with intense interest to the rumor 
that Miss Goodell had thrown a dipperful 
of water in Mary's face, because she was 
impudent. 



The dunce block, a rough hewn stump 
on legs, and the foolscap of newspaper 
are distinctly recalled by pupils of differ- 
ent generations. " She also made use of 
the under part of the school house 
which was dark, to shut up the unruly 
ones. I must have have been one of that 
number" says the father of three boys, 
" for I recollect it, and I was even taken 
once in her arms down the hill into the 
cellar of her own house, and shown a dark 
place where the wickedest of the wicked 
were put." 

Perhaps it is only natural that so many 
of the reminiscences have to do with Miss 
Goodell's discipline but there are not 
wanting pleasant recollections of another 
sort. One of her girls writes "Every 
one seemed to me old in those days, but 
I don't think she seemed any more so 
than all grown-up people. I was fond of 
her perhaps because she was more in- 
dulgent to me than to most of her scholars. 
She was a faithful teacher and was I think 
fond of her scholars." And one of the 
boys speaks of her as " one from whom I 
had great affection and for whom I still 
cherish the very pleasantest recollections." 
Others recall with pleasure their school 
days, the privilege of sitting by Miss 
Goodell's side and of rendering her some 
little personal service, learning to knit, 
which was made almost a game by counting 
aloud at the beginning of each needle in 
the stocking and the certificates for good 
conduct which they carried home. 

This paper would be incomplete without 
especial mention of Miss Goodell's sister, 
Miss Lucretia, who so often bestowed 
upon the boy or girl sent to her house 
for some errand, a pear, an apple, a 
doughnut or cookey, a few raisins or even 
a piece of mince pie ! It is said that she 
was not always amiable and then the visits 
were less enjoyable. " She guarded the 
house and grounds from the intrusion of 



AN ANCIENT SCHOOL-DAME. 



477 



the boys to whom she was rather a terror. 
But doubtless she wished well to them all 
and on one notable occasion when all the 
pupils were invited to a cherry festival at 
Miss Goodell's house, it was Miss Lucretia 
who dealt out the cherries with a liberal 
hand." 

Visits from parents were probably rare, 
though a day is remembered when Rev. 
Dr. Arms and another gentlemen came in, 
seeming enormous in size and imposing in 
dignity. And quite as memorable was a 
visit of Henry Bond, Edward Harland and 
Ned Stedman to the school from which 
they had graduated, for they shone in the 
eyes of the scholars with a lustre trans- 
cending what they have since gained in 
commerce, war, and literature. 

There is not much that is personal in 
Miss Goodell's records. Memoranda oc- 
casionally of days lost during the term on 
account of bad weather or illness or re- 
pairs made necessary by the carpenter's 
bad work, for all which she scrupulously 
made a deduction on her bills ; of a snow 
storm April 13, 1836, when several inches 
fell between noon and four o'clock, of a 
dry spell in the summer of 1843, when for 
one month and two days there was but one 
small shower, of two fires uptown when 
the old Dr. Lord mansion was burned 
Sunday, May 10, 1852, and Mr. Peter 
Lanman's factory the next day. The ages 
and birthdays of the children are often 
noted, and sometimes the death of those 
who had been her scholars. We have a 
glimpse of tenderness, perhaps unsuspec- 
ted, in recording the death of Richard 
Turvill Adams, aged 12, of consumption, 
in 1847, she adds the words : 
" Happy soul thy days are ended, 

All thy mourning days below," and the 
text 
" Suffer the little children to come unto 
me. 



Repeatedly in the early days I find 
such a note as this. u These four Elizas 
were Mrs. Lemngwell's scholars," as 
though at that time there was no public 
school that these girls could attend. 

We are dealing with days long past. 
These reminiscences are of a period forty, 
fifty, sixty, seventy years ago, so that Miss 
Goodell is to be regarded as a type of her 
own generation rather than compared with 
teachers and methods of the present day. 
Yet modern teachers would value such 
tributes from their scholars as the fol- 
lowing : 

" She always seems to me when I think 
of her so unique and genuine and in- 
teresting a character that I do not like to 
have the memories of her work pass away 
unrecorded. I always think of Miss 
Goodell and her school with great satis- 
faction. She was \he frie?id oi her pupils. 
Her principal object was not to make 
money. It was not to go through a mere 
routine of school work. It was to have 
the boys and girls good, obedient and 
thorough in what they pretended to study. 
She had the same fidelity in her humble 
department of work, which President 
Woolsey had in his. What she taught us 
we had to learn. She also sought to form 
character. She would have considered it 
the most absurd of theories that a teacher 
was to instruct the children in spelling 
and geography, but not to teach them 
order, industry, obedience, kindness, and 
reverence for their elders. The thought 
of duty to God and man ruled her own 
soul and she aimed to make it rule the 
souls of her pupils. 

" If she were still on earth I should say, 
May God bless and reward her. I do say 
so. And may God bless the old school- 
mates and friends wherever they are 
scattered to-day." 






AN OLD TIME HERO. 



COMMODORE CHARLES MORRIS. 



BY ELLEN D. LARNED. 



II. 



IN years of continued service Charles 
Morris faithfully fulfilled every duty 
assigned him and enjoyed many interesting 
experiences but did not come prominently 
before the public till in connection with 
the " Old Ironsides " in the war of 1812. 
Just one week after the declaration of war 
June 25, he entered upon service as first 
lieutenant of the Frigate Constitution, 
Capt. Hull. The equipment of the ship 
was very imperfect, only part of her guns 
mounted, complement of men deficient 
and lacking specific training- On July 
12th, they set out for New York to join 
the fleet under Commodore Rogers. 
Scarcely had they passed the mouth of 
the Delaware when they espied a number 
of ships in the offing, and when morning 
came found the Constitution surrounded 
by the British squadron. A large frigate, 
a ship of the line, three small frigates, a 
brig and a schooner, about two miles 
astern with English colors flying and all 
sails set, were ready to bear down upon 
them. Had the nearest frigate gone for 
them at once escape would have been im- 
possible, but a needless manoeuvre causing 
some ten minutes delay allowed our Old 
Ironsides to gain a distance that proved 
of inestimable value in the succeeding 
chase. For two days and nights the gal- 
lant ship managed to evade this body of 
pursuers. All means were adopted that 
promised increase of speed. Hammocks 
478 



were removed, clothes rolled up, the sails 
drenched with water to tighten the texture 
of the canvass, but the ship at best was so 
poor a sailor that escape seemed hopeless. 
In the first morning the enemy called all 
its boats together and prepared for a 
combined attack, but a breeze sprung up 
that carried the Constitution onward 
before their sails could be set to profit by 
it. It was then that Lieutenant Morris 
suggested an expedient practiced on board 
the "President" in Mediterranean harbors. 
It was to move the ship by means of ropes, 
or "warping" as it was called. "The 
launch and first cutter were sent ahead with 
a kedge (light anchor) and all the hawsers 
and rigging from five inches and upwards 
that could be found making nearly a mile 
in length. When the kedge was thrown 
the men hauled on the connecting hawser" 
and they were enabled whenever the wind 
slackened to keep well in advance of 
the fleet. After another anxious and 
sleepless night they found their pursuers 
had closed in around them and would 
soon be within gun shot. Their only means 
of escape was tacking in face of the enemy 
and exposed to a broadside from the 
nearest frigate, but again the English 
captain failed to improve an opportunity 
and Old Ironsides sailed off ahead of them 
all. As the wind increased during the 
day the contest became a sailing match. 
At times some of the English ships would 



AN OLD TIME HERO. 



4/9 



gain speedily upon them but by unremit- 
ting care and skill, with favoring winds and 
showers the Constitution more than held 
its own, and on the morning of July 19th, 
it was so far in advance that the foe gave 
up the chase. This escape from so large 
a force was considered a remarkable 
nautical achievement and brought officers 
and crew honor. Arriving in Boston July 
27th, Capt. Hull was so loaded with com- 
pliments that he posted a card at the 
public exchange asking the public " To 
transfer a great part of their good wishes 







CHARGES MORRIS. 

to Lieut Morris and other brave officers 
and the crew under his command. " 

In just a month, August 19, the Con- 
stitution achieved the memorable capture 
of the Guerriere, so vividly depicted in 
true-blue color upon household wares 
held as our highest treasures. After 
skirmishing through the afternoon, the 
ships opened fire about six and engaged 
in a most spirited conflict. Going aloft 
to consider the chances of boarding, 
Lieutenant Morris received a ball through 
33 



the body, and another lieutenant was 
instantly killed. Still greater losses and 
injuries were suffered by the Guerriere, 
which at 6.30 fired a gun in token of 
surrender. This victory at so early a 
period of the war gave great satisfaction 
and encouragement to people and govern- 
ment, and was hailed as an earnest of what 
might be expected in future years from 
the United States Navy. 

Lieutenant Morris was now promoted 
to the rank of post-captain, and from the 
severity of his wound was obliged to rest 
upon his laurels for a number of months. 
After receiving command of the "Adams" 
his good fortune seemed to desert him. 
The ship was poorly adapted for service, 
and he returned from a second cruise 
" without either profit or fame." The next 
venture, August, 1814, was even more 
disastrous. In their mission of guarding 
New England coast they encountered a 
gale near Mount Desert, were driven 
upon rocks, and barely rescued life and 
vessel. Proceeding up Penobscot River 
for recruiting and repairs at Hampton, an 
express brought news that the British had 
taken Castine, and were hastening up the 
river, "To cut out the Adams." The 
militia of the neighborhood was hastily 
summoned and guns placed in favorable 
positions, but upon the approach of the 
enemy the militia broke away in dis- 
order, and the naval force was compelled 
to retreat or surrender. Having fired the 
ship and spiked the guns, they effected 
their escape, although the enemy was so 
close upon them that they had to leave 
all their personal effects and barely 
crossed the river by fording. Making for 
Portsmouth over a new road, through a 
sparsely settled country, they had much 
difficulty in finding enough to eat. 
Stopping one night at a small cabin 
without floors or glass, occupied by a 
young couple, they found nothing but 



480 TIME. 

five live sheep, which they were obliged their respective courts. He was met at 

to kill, dress and eat in genuine Arab the stairway of one by an elderly black 

fashion. Our hero's first command re- man in plain attire whom he mistook for a 

suited in loss of ship and subjection to a servant but who proved to be the Emperor 

Court of Inquiry. He bore the reverse Christopher. He gives a very interesting 

with his usual good sense and philosophy, account of the government and condition 

sustained by favorable verdict and his of affairs upon the island and of various 

consciousness of having done the best experiences that befell him in these ex- 

that was in his power. perimental services. Sometimes when 

After the close of the war Captain commissioned by the government to enter 

Morris was called to varied service. In upon negotiations with South American 

1815 as captain of the ''Congress" he con- powers he would find the government to 

veyed the newly appointed minister and which he was deputized had fallen to 

his suite to Holland. Next he was placed pieces before he had time to present cre- 

in command of a squadron in the Gulf of dentials. In all these varied services 

of Mexico when among many interesting Commodore Morris acquitted himself 

experiences he conducted negotiations with that prudence and wisdom that gave 

with Petion and Christopher, the rival him so high a place among the early 

governors of Hayti, and was presented at officers of our navy. 



TIME. 



BY ARTHUR FREMONT RIDER. 



One day I list to a river's voice, 

As it rippled and trembled and seemed to rejoice ; 

And I thought I heard it speak more strong, 

" How long? How lung?" 

And I thought of how long the river had run 

From set of sun, to set of sun ; 

Of the thousands of years it had toiled away 

To hollow its path where now it lay ; 

And I thought of the years it had flowed along, 

" How long? How long? " 

And yet I thought, compared with time 
And eternity more vast, sublime ; 
When a million years are as a day, 
What was the time it had worked away? 
What was that liver's lengthened life? 
A dot, a mote, an atom of strife. 
This was the time it had exchanged ; 
And as I thought the river changed 
It's moaning notes to a tone of cheer 
And now and again I seemed to hear 
A different song, of another sort, 

" How short ! How short ! " 



LIST OF BURIALS, CENTER CHURCH BURYING 
GROUND, HARTFORD. 



ANNOTATED BY MARY K. TALCOTT. 



1799 

April 20 



23 

May 14 
16 

23 

June 4 

10 



July 5 

5 



24 
28 



Aug:. 6 



12 



16 

17 

18 



Child of Asa Hopkins, aged 1 

year. 
Lucy Wadsworth [daughter of 

Eli and Rachel (Hill) Wads- 
worth], aged 19 years. 
Elisabeth Bunce [widow], aged 

56 years. 
Isaac Dickinson, aged 60 years. 
Son of Joseph Woodbridge 

[Harry, aged 24] years. 
Child of Geo. Burr[JamesStarr]. 
Child of John Lee, aged 1 year. 
Daughter of Mrs. Mary Barnard 

[Ann], aged 19 years. 
Benjamin Watrous (Waters,) 

aged 66 years. 
Thomas Sloane, aged 62 years. 
Joseph Talcott [son of Joseph 

and Esther (Pratt) Talcott, 

bapt. Aug. 11, 1728], aged 61 

years. 
The Wife of Joshua Hemstead 

[Anne], aged 67 years. 
Infant Child of Oliver Wells. 
Daughter of Ashbel Wells, aged 

15 years. 
[Miss] Lydia Law, aged 42 years. 
Son of John Brooks, aged 10 

years. 
The Wife of Frederick Seymour 

[Prudence Minor of New Lon- 
don], aged 30 years. 
Reuben Judd [son of Simeon and 

Elizabeth (Norton) Judd, born 

in Farmington, Aug. 9, 1750], 

aged 49 years. 
Mr. Samuel Horton, aged 22 

years. 
Son of James Cook, aged 16 

years 
Chauncey Gotten, aged 21 years. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



23 



23 



23 

28 

18 

4 

5 



Ebenezer Barnard [son of Samuel 
and Sarah (Williamson) Bar- 
nard, bapt. Jan. 9, 1726], aged 
73 years. 

A Mr. Munn. 

Joseph Day, No age given 
[son of Samuel and Hannah 
(Ashley) Day]. 

The Wife of Joseph Day [Rhoda, 
dau. Thomas and Eunice 
(Clapp) Steele]. 

Robt. Branthwait's Wife. No 
age given [Robert. Branthwait 
and Ruth Collier were married 
Dec. 29, 1768,] aged 64 years. 

Robt. Branthwait, [aged 61 
years]. 

Infant Child of Daniel Hopkins. 

James A. [H.?] Wells' Child, 
aged 1 year. 

Mr. James. 

John Thomas, aged 66 years. 

Infant Child of Norman Butler. 

Widow Hannah Day [widow of 
Samuel Day, and dau. of Joseph 
and Mary (Steele) Ashley, 
bapt. Oct. 13, 1717], aged 82 
years. 

JerushaDay[daughter of Samuel 
and Hannah (Ashley) Day], 
aged 49 years. 

The Wife of Ezra Hyde, aged 56 
years. 

Child of Oliver Borman, aged 7 
years. 

Sim. Nepton, aged 36 years. 

Infant Child of TheodoreDwight. 

John Packwood, aged 39 years. 

Mrs. Sarah Burr [dau. of Robert 
and Elizabeth (Barnard) King, 
wife of Moses Burr], aged 73 
years. 



481 



482 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



June 2 



July 



10 



24 



25 



16 William Bull [son of Caleb and 23 

Martha (Cad well) Bull, born 
Aug. 22, 1748, died in Litch- May 1 
field, Oct. 13], aged 51 years. 

16 I/ydia Andross, aged 54 years. 

17 Isaac Tucker, aged 82 years. 

20 Geo. Barrett's Child [George] 1 

aged 4 years. 1 

20 Mrs. Hannah Watson [widow of 30 

John Watson and dau. of John 
and Hannah (Norton) Pratt], 
aged 71 years. 

21 Daughter of Joshua Hempsted, 

aged 32 years. 
26 Sally Bronson, aged 46 years. 
Nov. 2 Son of George Burr [Chauncey], 
aged 10 years. 

13 Mary Spencer, aged 73 years. 
Dec. 5 Benj. Hobert, aged 37 years. 

15 The Wife of Jesse Dean, aged 25 

years. 
19 Child of Isaac Bliss,aged 5 years. 

1800 

Jan. 2 Child of Peter Colt, aged 9 
years. 

14 Child of Martin Kingsley 

[infant]. 
17 The Wife of Geo. Burnham 
[Nancy, dau. of Daniel and 
Abigail Bigelow, born Nov. 18, 
1754], aged 45 years. 

29 Child of Elijah Burr. 

30 The Wife of James Cook, aged 

38 years. 
Feb. 2 Infant Child of Thomas Chester. 
17 Elijah Clapp [son of Elijah and 

Mary (Benton) Clapp], aged 

47 years. 
Mar. 10 Clary Marsh, aged 17 years. 

15 John Barnard's Wife [Hannah Sept. 3 

dau. of Jonathan and Tabitha 5 

( Coleman )Bigelow, born 1738], 

aged 61 years. 16 

16 Wife of Roger Clapp [Mary], 21 

aged 34 years. 

23 Child of Mrs. Burr, aged 1 year. 

24 The Wife of William Moys 

(Mize in Second Church 

Record), aged 52 years. Oct. 11 

24 Infant Child of Stephen Skinner. 1 

April 15 Infant Child of William Hudson. 

15 Infant Child of Thomas Belden. 9 

17 Child of Ephraim Root, aged 4 

months. q 



Aug. 5 

5 
10 

15 

23 

27 

29 



Sarah Clark [widow], aged 90 
years. 

Freeman Seymour [son of 
Richard and Elizabeth (Wads- 
worth) Seymour, born Jan. 17, 
^S 6 ]. aged 45 years. 
Infant Child of Jonah Sloane. 
Mrs. Dodd, aged 93 years. 

Child of Ambrose Wadsworth, 
aged 4 months. 

Child of Mrs. Stanley, Burial 
Chd. Daniel Olcott [dau. of Frede- 
rick Stanley]. 

Child of Mrs. Barnabas Swift, 
aged 8 years. 

The Wife of John Wolf, aged 37 
years. 

Mrs. Ellery, Widow of John 
Ellery [Eunice dau. of Capt. 
Nathaniel and Eunice (Tal- 
cott) Hooker], aged 60 years. 

Mr. Winchell [Ezekiel], aged 42 
years. 

Child of Polly Gains, aged 1 
year. 

Child of Joseph Woodbridge 
[Emily, aged 17 months]. 

Son of Hezekiah Wyllys [Ferdi- 
nand, born 1793], aged 7 years. 

John Burbridge, aged 49 years. 

Hannah Burkett, aged 60 years. 

Daughter of Reuben Caleson, 
aged 8 years. 

William Knox, aged 35 years. 

Child of Porter Burnham 
[Henry], aged 2 years. 

Elisha Wells, Infant Child 
[Clarissa], aged 6 weeks. 

Infant Child of William Henry. 

Son of Caleb Tuttle, aged 5 
years. 

Child of Tim Keney, aged 1 year. 

The Wife of Geo. Bull [Catherine, 
dau. of Samuel and Catherine 
(Chenevard) Marsh; she died 
Sept. 20, 1800, at Northamp- 
ton], aged 31 years. 

Ebeneser Adams, aged 76 years. 

The Wife of Samuel Day, aged 46 
years. 

The Wife of Elias Francis, aged 
52 years. 

Infant Child of Isaac Bliss. 



BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 483 



17 Child of Ebeneser Phelps, aged 

6 months. 

19 Infant Child of Geo. Steele. 
Nov. 2 William Bull, aged 53 years. 

12 Child of John Haynes Lord, 
aged 4 years. 

12 The wife of Geo. Steele [Eliza- 
beth], aged 28 years. 

14 The mother of Paul King, aged 
81 years. 

18 Polly Benton, aged 49 years. 

29 AFrench Prisoner, burial charged 
the United States. 
Dec. 7 Isaac Davis, aged 35 years. 

1801 

Mar. 8 Child of Ezekiel Porter Burnham 

[Henry]. 
16 Wife of Alpeas Alford, aged 52 

years. 
25 Daughter of John Shepard, aged 

22 years. 

20 Daughter of Roger Clap[ Betsey], 

aged 14 years. 
29 Syman Clark to digging a grave 
for French prisoner. 
April 2 Charles Caldwell [son of John 
and Hannah (Stillman) Cald- 
well, bapt. Feb. 27, 1731-2], 
aged 69 years. 

10 Son of Joseph Tooker [Michael], 

aged 18 years. 
12 Child of John Graham. 

19 [Dr. ] Lemuel Hopkins [son of 

Stephen and Dorothy (Tal- 
mage) Hopkins, born in Water- 
bury, June 19, 1750], aged 50 
years. 

20 Susanah Talcot [daughter of 

Joseph and Esther (Pratt) Tal- 
cott, born August 9, 1730] , aged 
70 years. 
May 12 Wife of William Whitman[Lucy, 
daughter of Timothy and 
Sarah (Seymour) Steele, born 
1769], aged 32 years. 
20 Child of William Redfield, aged 

4 years. 

June 11 James Taylor, aged 29 years. 

11 Child of Geo. Tinker. 

18 Child of Joshua Lepingwell, aged 

5 years. 

24 William C ? [illegible], aged 48 
years. 



49 



July 



Auj 



18 

22 

8 



10 

14 

27 



26 Wife of James Lamb, aged 

years. 
16 Ralf Bingham, aged 41 years. 
18 Hezekiah Mearels [son of Capt. 
Hezekiah and Sarah (Butler) 
Merrill, born 1750], aged 51 
years. 
Daughter of Ephrem Robins, 

aged 21 years. 
Child of William Skinner. 
Roderick Olcot [son of Samuel 
and Mary (Chenevard) Olcott, 
born May 3, 1766], aged 35 
years. 
Child of William Starr [Harriet]. 
Child of Mary Avry, aged 1 year. 
Richard Goodman to toling the 
bell for Abigail Hunt [ Richard 
Goodman married Elizabeth 
daughter of Alexander and 
Abigail Hunt of, Wethers- 
field], aged 70 years. 
Child of Thomas Dickey, aged 2 

years. 
Wife of James Hanary, Charged 

the Town, aged 48 years. 
Child of Edward Dolphin, aged 

1 year. 
Child of [John and] Huldah 
Burbridge [Fitz Edward], aged 
1 year. 
Child of John Caldwell [James], 
aged 3 years. 
[After October, 180 1, many individuals, 
living in the south part of the City, were 
buried in the South Yard on Maple Avenue, 
which was opened at that time, but it is 
impossible to tell from the sexton's list 
where each person was laid. Therefore 
the names have been printed as they are 
written]. The original list from which 
the following is printed is in possession of 
the Connecticut Historical Society. 
Oct. 2 Wife of William Cad well, aged 
30 years. 
3 Child of James Indicot. 
18 Son of James Bigelow,the second, 

aged 6 years. 
18 Child of Joseph Haris, aged 1 
year. 
Timothy Shepard [Son of Timo- 
thy and Lydia (Phelps) 
Shepard, bapt. Sept. 15, 1745], 
aged 56 years. 



Sept. 6 



13 



24 



30 



26 



484 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



26 Child of Siprin (Cyprian) Nicols 
[Caty], aged 1 year. 
Nov. 12 John Jeffrey [He came to Hart- 
ford from Rhinebeck, married 
Oct. 28, 1766, Sarah, daughter 
of Capt. William Nichols], aged 
59 years. 

14 Son of Nathaniel Skinner, aged 
4 years. 

16 Child of Frank Annan, aged 1 

year. 

17 Michael Chenevard [son of Capt. 

John and Hepzibah (Collyer) 
Chenevard], aged 30 years. 
Dec. 1 Child of Menzies Rayner. 

5 Consider Barrows, aged 26 years. 

18 Eunice Tucker [widow], aged 

72 years. 

19 Moses Butler [son of Jonathan 

and Mary (Easton) Butler, 
bapt. Sept. 2, 1716], aged 86 
years. 

21 Mother of JosephHumfris[ Anne, 
widow of Dositheus Humphrey 
and daughter of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth (Cook) Griswold, 
born in Windsor, May 28,1708], 
aged 89 years. 

26 Joseph Webster [son of Medad 
and Elizabeth (Holtom) Web- 
ster], aged 50 years. 
Child of John Smith. 



3o 
1802 



Jan. 



1 
8 

27 
3i 



Feb. 



John Calder [He married Jennett 

Morrison, widow of Lieut. 

William Knox], aged 50 years. 
Child of Geo. Tayller. 
Wife of Levi Robins, aged 50 

years. 
Child of Ebenezer Moore, aged 3 

years. 
Child of William Cad well, aged 

1 year. 
James Thomas to digging a grave 

for Mrs. [widow, D.] Brown, 

aged 95 years. 
Child of Norman Goodwin of 

New Hartford, aged 1 year. 
Daniel Jones [son of Amasa and 

Hope (Lord) Jones, born in 

Colchester, Aug. 28, 1755], aged 

46 years. 
Mary Boyanton, aged 30 years. 
Allin McKey, aged 40 years. 



13 



14 



14 



15 





18 




19 




27 




3K 


April 


4 




9 




16 




25 


May 


21 




22 


June 


3 


May 


13 


June 


29 



July 12 
15 

15 
20 

24 

30 

Aug. 1 



Wife of Prince Brewster [Alethia 
daughter of Josiah and Sarah 
(Chamberlain) Foote, born in 
Colchester, July 17, 1744]. 

Daughter of John Shepard, aged 
18 years. 

Rev. Benjamin Boardman [son 
of Edward andDorothy (Smith) 
Boardman, born in Glaston- 
bury. Aug. 3, 1731]. aged 70 
years. 

Lydia Terry, charged the Town, 
aged 46 years. 

John Bartes (Baxter?), charged 
the Town, aged 55 years. 

Child of Anna Seet(?) 

Child of John Blaxson. 

Child of Samuel Danforth. 
3i(?)Child of Theodore Olcott, aged 1 
year. 

Zacariah Miller, aged 2 years. 

Daughter of Thomas Tisdall 
[Emily], aged 8 years. 

Uriah Shepard, aged 41 years. 

William Hinsdale, aged 47 years. 

John McCurdy [James, on South 
Church Record], aged 54 years. 

Son of Asel Renals, aged 7 years. 

Son of Thomas Y. Seymour 
[James Davenport, born Dec. 
19, 1797], aged 4 years. 

Child of Oliver Miner. 

Aseph Hall to toling the bell for 
Mrs. Ripaneer, aged 67 years. 

Child of Silas Swift, aged 3 
months. 

Child of Elizabeth Curtice, 
charged the Town. 

Child of James Anderson. 

Father of Benjamin Conkling, 
aged 74 years. 

Son of Jacob Sargent, aged 11 
years. 

Son of Jacob Chapman, aged 3 
weeks. 

Child of Theodore Dwight, aged 
1 month. 

Thomas Wadsworth to digging a 
grave for Mrs. Elizabeth Mash 
[widow of Capt. Jonathan 
Marsh and daughter of David 
and Lydia (Marsh) Iyoomis of 
Windsor, born Sept. 26, 1704], 
aged 98 years. 

{To be Continued.') 



MILFORD CEMETERY. 



BY M. LOUISE GREENE. 



II. 



AMONG the men of ye olden time 
whose force and • character shaped 
not only the destinies of the town but of 
the state, the sermons on these stones 
have for their text many names, and 
prominent among them aie those of 
Robert Treat and Jonathan Law. 

Attracted by Mr. Prudden's character 
and preaching, Robert Treat left the 
Wethersfield settlement to follow the 
minister to Milford. A young surveyor, 
he found his services in great demand in 
the new settlement. The "piety, integrity, 
wisdom, firmness and courage " which so 
long endeared him to his townsmen 
quickly manifested themselves. He was 
admitted a freeman and rose rapidly in 
both civil and military service. He 
served as justice of the peace, 1645, as 
delegate to New Haven General Court, 
as Deputy and, from 1659 to J 663, as 
magistrate for Milford. In 1683 he was 
governor of Connecticut. Clear-sighted 
as to the dangers threatening the ecclesi- 
astic republic of New Haven, he urged 
Milford's secession from her jurisdiction 
and union with the powerful Hartford 
settlement. So great was his influence that 
he carried his town into the Connecticut 
commonweal th,not in unwilling submission 
to the enlarged franchise but as a voluntary 
applicant for membership. This member- 
ship marked the great change which the 
first forty years of colonial life had 
wrought in men's views of church and 
state. The severe tests of the earlier day 
485 



for admission to the churches, requiring 
a rigorous examination and a public and 
personal narration of the history of one's 
conversion, was largely giving way to the 
Half- Way Covenant practice, that is, to 
the admission to a restricted church 
membership of those of moral life who 
had been baptized in infancy. In Connec- 
ticut, men had decided that government 
should be in the hands of the majority and 
no longer be centered in the exceedingly 
small minority who could so account for 
themselves as to be acceptable to the 
churches for full privileges of membership, 
including that highest one of communion 
at the Lord's table. Meanwhile the 
Indian dangers had developed Robert 
Treat's military abilities. He was ap- 
pointed Captain in 1662, Major in 1670 
and Colonel in 1674. The following year, 
he was sent with the Connecticut troops 
to Westfield and was present at the attack 
on Springfield, September 16th. He 
drove back the Indians in their assault on 
Hadley. At the famous swamp fight in 
the Narrangansett country he led the 
Connecticut soldiers, following the Ply- 
mouth men under General Winslow. 
Both town and colony rewarded his ser- 
vices with large grants of land. To return 
to his civil honors, he was elected deputy 
governor of Connecticut, 1676-1682, and 
from 1683 to 1698 served as chief execu- 
tive of the colony. Refusing further 
election, he was continued in the office of 
deputy governor until his death in 1710. 



486 



MILFORD CEMETERY. 



His Milford home was on Governor's 
Lane some rods west of the present 
Jonah Clark house. He married for his 
first wife Jane, daughter of Edmund Tapp. 




THE GOVERNOR TREAT HOUSE. 

She died April 8, 1703. The Governor's 
second wife was widow Elizabeth Bryan, 
whom he married October 22, 1705. She 
died January, 1706. 

Governor Jonathan Law's laurels were 
of the civic order. Born August 16, 1674, 
he graduated from Harvard 1695, and 
three years later began the practice of law 
in Milford. He early made a reputation 
by his judicial decisions and by his 
oratory. At thirty he had risen to be 
chief justice. He was assistant in 1717, 
and through the deputy-governor's office 
rose to the gubernatorial chair. That he 
filled from 1741 to 1750, dying in office. 
Governor Law's residence was destroyed 
a few years ago to make room for a new 
house on River Street, nearly on a line 
with the Town Hall. Governor Law had 
to deal with the vexing questions of church 
and state which rose out of the controversy 
between the Old and New Light parties in 
the churches and the resultant changes 
through ecclesiastical legislation both bad 
and good until the revision of the colony 
laws in 1750 and, again later, brought a 



larger toleration for those outside the 
Congregational pale. 

Of clergymen who here rest from their 
labors, the second, third, fourth and 
seventh pastors of the First Church and 
the first of Plymouth or the Second 
Church should receive mention even in so 
brief a sketch as this. In the two hundred 
and sixty years of its existence, the First 
Church has been pastorless only fifteen 
years and four of these followed the death 
of its founder and leader, Rev. Peter 
Prudden. The average pastorate has 
been seventeen years, yet Roger Newton 
was pastor twenty-three years, Samuel 
Andrews fifty-two years, Rev. Samue^ 
Whittlesey, thirty-one years, and Rev. 
Bezaliel Pinneo forty-four years. The 
first pastor was of English birth and edu- 
cation though finishing his college course 
at Harvard and his theological studies with 
his father-in-law, Doctor Hooker of Hart- 
ford. A specific note records that he 
" was ordained Pastour, with praier and 
fasting, and ye laying on of ye hands of 
Zach. Whitman, Elder, John Fletcher, 
Deacon and Mr. Rob. Treat magistrate, 
though not as magistrate and Deacon, but 
as appointed by ye church to joyne with 
ye Ruling elder in laying on hands in ye 




THE GOVERNOR EAW HOUSE. 



He 



name of ye church Aug. 22, 1660." 
lived where Dr. Caroli's house now 
stands. He was scholarly, popular and 
beloved. 



MIL FORD CEMETERY. 



43/ 



Rev. Samuel Andrew's name is always 
associated with Yale College, though a 
Massachusetts man and Harvard graduate 
of 1675. As resident tutor and charged 
with a large share of the college govern- 
ment for a number of years he was pre- 
paring for the part he was to take later in 
the founding of Yale, for his term of cor- 
poration-membership lasting thirty-eight 
years, and for his years of Rectorship, 
1707- 1719, 
w hen his 
own son-in- 
1 a w, Timo- 
thy Cutler 
of Stamford, 
su c c e e d e d 
him in of- 
fice. During 
these last 
years, Dr. 
Andrews in- 
structed the 
senior col- 
lege classes 
in Milford. 
Before the 
founding of 
Yale, it had 
been his 
custom t o 
instruct stu- 
d en ts in 

theology. In this he was profoundly in- 
terested. According to his ideas he was 
distinctly the minister and the pastoral 
duties of the church belong to his subor- 
dinate officers. He was markedly an 
exponent of his age, "learned, theological, 
ecclesiastical, formal, religious" — one of 
its best types. He was conservative. He 
would have nothing to do with the Half- 
Way Covenant practices. He was wealthy 
and lived and dressed befitting his station. 



The town \va.-> proud of him and corpo- 
rately and individually showed its appre- 
ciation by gifts. Much land was granted 
him, beside his salary of ^£200*. He had 
married Abigail, youngest daughter of 
Governor Treat, soon after coming to 
Milford in 16S5. With his family of four 
sons and three daughters, he lived on the 
site of Henry J. Bristol's place. Here he 
had a library of about two hundred books, 




THE TREAT CORXEK, 



a great library for that day. He died 
in 1737, at the dawn of the " Great 
Awakening," which was to wreck that 
elaborate ecclesiastical system, which, as 
one of the chief promoters of the Saybrook 
Platform, he had so carefully formulated. 
The Rev. Samuel Whittlesey, born in 
Wallmgford, July 10, 1713, was the son of 
one of the colony's wealthiest and most 
influential ministers. He graduated from 
Yale 1729, studied theology with his 



*In 1696, it was ^100 in provisions at current rates: and ^12 each from the town 
treasury for firewood ; rn 1710. /.T50 in provisions and /.~T2 for wood. 



4 88 



MIL FORD CEMETERY. 



father, and in 1737 was ordained colleague- 
pastor with the Rev. Samuel Andrew at 
Milford. His ordination was opposed by 
a very respectable minority who finally 
consented on condition that, if, at the end 
of six months, they still found his preach- 
ing unsatisfactory, the church would unite 
in his dismissal for a candidate acceptable 
to all. The minority, at the end of two 
years began again to complain of the lack 
of force and of the moral rather than 
spiritual character of his discourse. But 
the majority told them it was too late to 
complain. Neither the town nor the 




THE JONATHAN EAW MONUMENT. 



Association of New Haven County would 
listen to them. Finally they resolved to 
appeal to the colony law and as " sober 
dissenters" from the established church, 
they, under the leadership of George Clark 
Jr. withdrew from worship in the First 
Church. They worbhipped in Clark's 
house the first Sunday of December.i 741, 
and on the last Tuesday of Janunry,i742, 
having taken the required oath before the 
court they proceeded to organize the 
Second or later Plymouth Church. Like 
other followers of Whitfield and the New 
Light preachers their path was thorny 



with restrictions and petty persecutions 
so long as the Old Lights controlled the 
votes in the colonial councils. By 1747, 
the seceders were permitted to sit down 
in peace under the ministration of their 
first settled pastor, Rev. Job Prudden, 
grandson of Peter — The epitaph upon his 
gravestone — " A bountiful benefactor to 
mankind, well-beloved in his life and 
much lamented in his death" sums up his 
life. He was a man to lessen the cen- 
soriousness of religious opponents. The 
factional spirit died out after a while, but 
it had been so strong that the Second 

Church had 
judged it best 
in order to 
avoid possible 
trouble to send 
delegates to 
ordain Mr. 
Prudden in 
New Jersey. 
Mr. Prudden 
died of small- 
pox,contracted 
while visiting a 
patient. He 
left consider- 
able property 
to his church. 
From 1743 to 
about 1839, tne i r church stood next Mr. 
George Strong's house. On October 19, 
1776, the two churches agreed to com- 
mune together. Meanwhile the Rev. 
Samuel Whittlesey continued his pros- 
perous ministry with the majority of the, 
old church until his death. He himself 
did not begin nor personally encourage 
the strife between the churches. He was 
by nature a man of peace, lovable and 
loving and. the controversy was a great 
grief to him. It couldn't be helped ; it 
was in the air, pitting church members 
against one another. 



MILFORD CEMETERY. 



489 



The Rev. Bezaliel Pinneo, the seventh 
pastor of the First Church was a native of 
Lebanon, Connecticut. He was born 
July 28, 1769, was a graduate of Dart- 
mouth, 1 79 1, and pastor at Milford 1796 
to 1839, where he died September 28, 
1849, at ^e age of eighty. "Next to Mr. 
Andrew, his was the most memorable of 
all the pastorates of the Milford Church." 
During his pastorate, powerful revivals 
occurred, noticeably those of 1816, 1828 
and 1832, the "cholera summer." During 
the early years 
of 1800, he 
preached once 
in two weeks 
in Orange until 
a separate 
church was es- 
tablished there. 
His hold upon 
his people was 
strong and he 
was commonly 
spoken of as 
" Father Pin- 
neo." He was 
"eminently dis- 
creet, faithful 
and successful" 
as minister, pas- 
tor and a most 
revered citizen. 

During Father Pinneo ; s ministry, the 
present house of worship was erected. 
On February 16, 1823, he gathered his 
people for the last time in the home where 
for nearly thirty years he had led and 
counselled them, — in the shaky old 
building where nearly a hundred years 
before the Rev. Samuel Andrew had 
preached the first sermon.* In his day, 
it had been the famous three decker with 
its second gallery for the blacks of which 
there were a considerable number both 



bond and free. The building was 80 by 
65 feet, three stories high with steeple, 
95 feet high. It had three entrances, the 
pulpit being on the north side. Towards 
its cost was given the proceeds from the 
town's flock of sheep, and a tax of 7d was 
laid in 1728 and one of 9d in 1729. A 
bell, weighing six hundred pounds was 
added in 1740, and also a tower clock. 
The long benches were removed in 1775 
and pews built. The interior was arched 
over, closing in the second gallery in 1803. 




THK PINNEO SIONKS. 

It was made a misdemeanor to sit out of 
one's own seat and the transgressor was 
fined. At the peace jubilee of 18 14, a 
lighted candle was placed before each 
pane of glass. The decorating of the 
present church with the more enduring 
tablets of brass in memory of her faithful 
servants, heroes of peace and soldiers of 
the church militant, on the recent two 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of her 
organization was a most fitting and worthy 
memorial. 



* The church of 6000 sermons, of 982 baptisms, of 813 admissions and of 576 con: 
munions. 



REV. CHARLES M. LAMSON. 



REV. Dr. Charles Marion Lamson, usefulness and honor, was born in the 
fifteenth minister of the First farming community of North Hadley, 
Church of Christ in Hartford, whose Mass., on May 16, 1843. The boy early 



■'-■ ■ ; ' ■';>"■"■ ■ ; .-* : .- : .' ■•.,.-■ - : ^'■v-;'^--4,. .•*.•',.*; -iv;;:- -W-i'i---^. 






REV, DR. CHARLES MARION EAMSON. 




sudden death at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, manifested a scholarly bent, which was 
on August eighth, ended a career of great developed under the training of Williston 

490 



REV. CHARLES M. LAM SON. 



491 



Seminary at Easthampton, and of Amherst 
College, where he graduated in the class of 
1864. Study at college was followed by a 
year of teaching at the Seminary where he 
had been a pupil, and by several years of 
instruction in Latin and English at his 
alma mater — a period interrupted by a 
course of study at the University of Halle 
in Germany. In spite of more than ordi- 
nary success 
as a teacher, 
however,Dr. 
Lams on's 
thoughts 
turned in- 
creasingly 
toward the 
ministry as 
his life-work, 
and with 
this purpose 
in view he 
studied 
t h eology 
during all 
the later 
portion of 
his tutor- 
ship, under 
the guid- 
ance of Pres- 
ident (then 
Professor) 
Julius H. 
Seelye, the 

impress Copyright 1899 by W. D. B. Clark. 
of whose DR. SAMSON 

thought he 

ever after bore. In 1S69 he became 
pastor of the Porter Church at Brockton, 
Mass., and the same year married Miss 
Helena F. Bridgman of Amherst, Mass. 
Two years later he entered on his longest 
pastorate, that of the Salem Street 
Church of Worcester, Mass. — a relation 
which he sustained till i88q, when he was 




settled over the North Church at St.Johns- 
bury, Vermont. From St. Johnsbury he 
came, in 1894, to Hartford. For ten years 
before his death he served on the Board 
of Trustees of Amherst College. He was 
a member of the Executive Committee of 
the Congregational Home Missionary 
Society. Since 1897 he has been Presi- 
dent of the American Board of Commis- 
sioners for 
Foreign 
Missions. 

Such, in 
the barest 
outline, are 
the more 
important 
events in the 
life of Dr. 
Lamson. 
But none 
who have 
ever met 
him can for- 
get his strik- 
i n g figure, 
and none 
who have 
come to 
know him 
can have 
failed to 
feel the win- 
someness of 
his nature. 
He won 
friends 
readily, and 
they loved him the better the more they 
knew him. His vigorous and vital 
presence, the air of hearty good cheer 
he carried with him, his entire absence 
of self-seeking, his simple and unaffected 
interest in the needs of other men, 
made him welcome everywhere. And his 
gifts were such as to rank him among the 



IN HIS STUDY 



492 



A RAINY DAY. 



first of the citizens of the places of his 
ministry. Always ready to serve the in- 
terests of the community to the extent of 
his powers, unsparing of labor or of time, 
he was useful as few men are. The posi- 
tions of trust and influence that he occu- 
pied sought him, they were never sought 



by him, and he brought to each his best. 
Kindly, simple - hearted, peace - loving, 
hard-working ; efficient in speech and in 
act ; of earnest, healthful, Christian char- 
acter, Dr. Lamson was an illustration of 
the New England type in its best de- 
velopment. Williston Walker. 



.. , <} . , -,,■■;:■?. .■■■■:■■■■■■ ; 



. I, t ;./.4.-. 









A RAINY DAY. 



BY HERBERT RANDALL. 



The white surf whispers through the rain 

In dreary cadency ; 
I hear the bell-buoy's muffled call ; 

The wild gulls dreamily 
Sway to and fro and dip their wings, 

Recrossing in their flight 
A murky sail that gropes its way 

To harbor for the night. 



The line is lost beyond the bar 

Where sea and sky should part ; 
The low winds grieve and reawake 

The memories in my heart ; 
The darkness of the past drifts down 

Across my reverie, 
And still the white surf whispers on 

In dreary cadency. 



GdlMM,®© 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all uauies of persons and places so that they cannot 
be^misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped, envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



CORRECTIONS. 

Query No. 77. Date in fourth line of 
query should read 1679 instead of 17 19. 

Query No. 92. Ann and Eliakim Hitch- 
cock were married about 1736-7 instead 
of the parents of Ann, whose birth, names, 
marriage and death records are wanted. 

ANSWERS. 

To No. 74. — Ebenezer Russell of Bran- 
ford married Abigail Rossiter, daughter 
of Benjamin and Sarah ( Moss, Baldwin) 
Rossiter of North Guilford. June 23, 
1784. He died in North Guilford Oct. 
12, 1850, aged 92. B. R. 

To 80 (a). — A genealogy of Bishop of 
Guilford and of some other Bishop fami- 
lies may be found in Putnam's Histori- 
cal Magazine, 1 896-1 899. Enquire at 
any large library. 

To Query 89 (b), The Chatham records 
show three, possibly four Jesse Higgins. 
1. Jesse 6 , b. Dec. 4, 1756, son of Lem- 
uel 5 and Elizabeth Cole Higgins. He 
(it is supposed) died at Danbury, Ct., 
of an accidental wound, Nov. 24, 1777. 
His line is Jesse 6 , Lemuel 5 , David 4 (b. 
Eastham or Orleans, Mass., 1706, d. in 

493 



Middle Haddam, 1771) Richard 3 , 
Benjamin 2 , Richard 1 , of Plymouth and 
Eastham, Mass. 2. Jesse 5 , b. June 28, 
1 731, at Eastham or Orleans, Mass., m. 
Nov. 16, 1752, Ruth Darte, dau. of 
Ebenezer and Ruth (Loomis) Darte of 
Haddam Neck, Conn. Mrs. Ruth Darte 
Higgins d. Oct. 1, 1776. And Jesse 5 
is said to have died in 1778 in the War. 
They had at least two children : Jesse 6 , 
b. 1753, m. Jan. 26, 1772, Keziah 
Stevens. Ruth 6 , b. 1755 (?), m. May 
5, 1773, John Wright, Jr. The line of 
Jesse 5 is Israel 4 (m. Ruth Brown) 
Samuel 3 (M.Hannah Cole), Benjamin 2 , 
Richard 1 , of Eastham, Mass. 3. Jesse 7 
Higgins, b. in Chatham, Conn., Jan. 25, 
1784, was son of Lemuel 6 and Charity 
Eddy Higgins. Lemuel 6 was brother 
of Jesse 6 1. above. Jesse 6 and Keziah 
(Stevens) Higgins had: Samuel 7 , b. 
Sept. 16, 1774. Jesse 7 , b. Aug. 21, 
1776, m. Lucynthia Smith, Nov. 9, 1798. 
Seth 7 , b. Dec. 2, 1778. m. Nancy S. 
Spencer, April 1, 1800. I know nothing 
about the ancestry of Keziah Stevens. 
Homer W. Brainard, 

88 Kenyon St., Hartford. 



494 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



QUERIES. 

97 . {a) Merwin. — Mary, wife of Lieut. 
Miles Merwin, of Durham, Conn. She 
was born 1722-4, d. at Durham, Jan. 
18, 1793. He was born at Milford, 
Conn., March 29, 17 20-1, d. at Dur- 
ham, Conn., Dec. 12, 1786. Wanted, 
names of father and mother of Mary. 
(b) Loomis. — Mehitable, of Windsor, 
Conn., married John Cole, Jan. 5, 1691. 
Who was her father and mother ? 

E. S. Chittenden, St. Paul, Minn. 

98. Baldwin. — Henry. Revolutionary 
soldier, private 6th Company, 7th 
Regiment. Enlisted from Saybrook, 
Conn., July n, 1775. Discharged Dec. 

18,1775. Capt. , Edward Shipman, 

Col. , Chas. Webb. After the war 

married Jane Shipman of same place 
and moved to Cornwall, Conn. Who 
were the parents of Henry Baldwin and 
Jane Shipman? Did they have any 
brothers and sisters? 

L. J. T. 

99. Wilcox. — John, of Hartford, died 
1651; his son John 2 , m. t. Sarah 
Wadsworth. 2. Katherine Stoughton. 3. 
Esther Cornwall, and moved to Middle- 
town,Conn., after second marriage. His 
sons were : Israel 3 , b. 1656. Samuel 3 , b. 
1658, and Epraim 3 , b. 1672 who m. 
Silence Hand. Israel 3 , m. Sarah Savage 
and had: Israel 4 , b. 1679, John 4 , b. 
1682, Samuel 4 , b. 1685, and Thomas 4 , 
b. 1687. It is desired to connect with 
the foregoing, John Wilcox, who was b. 
in Killingworth, April 15, 1732, m. 
Anna Stevens,and had : Ebenezerjohn, 
James, William, Anna, David, Levi, 
Amy and Dinah. T. 

100. Grihme (Graham). — Henry Grih- 
me and his wife Mary lived in Wethers- 
field Lane, Hartford, 1661. They had 
three sons : Benjamin, John and Joseph. 



Benjamin was afterward known as Ben- 
jamin Graham, and married for his 
first wife AbigailHumphrey of Weatogue 
in Simsbury. They had five sons : 
Benjamin, who died young, George, 
John, Benjamin and Samuel. W T anted 
— Whom did Samuel marry, the names 
of his children and the date of his 
death? H. C. L. 

101. Piatt. — Zebulon, moved from 
Redding to New Fairfield, Conn., in 
1 79 1. He married before 1773 Eunice, 
daughter of Abel Hubbell of Fairfield. 
It is thought his father's name was 
Timothy Piatt, Jr. What was his 
mother's name? W. C. P. 

102. (a) A n drews. — Joseph, fourth son 
of John the settler, born at Farmington, 

May 26, 165 1, married Rebecca . 

They located about the center of New- 
ington. Who was she? 

(b) Curtiss. — Dr. Joseph Andrews, 

son of John and Rebecca- , of 

Wethersfield (parish of Newington) 
married Sarah Curtiss of Long Island. 
Who was she ? 

(c) Hurlburl. — Elijah, third son of 
Dr. Joseph Andrews of Newington was 
born about 17 14. He married Phebe 
Hurlburt in 1745. Who was she? 

(d) Wright. — John Stanley, son of 
John Stanley and Esther Newell, born 
Feb. 17, 1682, married Mary Wright of 
Wethersfield, Dec. 9, 1714. Who were 
her parents ? 

(<?) Mix. — John Stanley, son of John 
and Mary Wright Stanley, born about 
1716, m. Sarah Mix. Who was she? 
(/) Griswold, — Mary, born 1783, m. 
Ebenezer Andrews, Oct. 26, 1800. She 
was dau. of Ashbel Griswold and Eliza- 
beth Woodruff. Who were they? 

E. L. P. 







EDITORIAL NOTES. 



VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT. 

ALONG the line of improvements in 
public libraries, now common, and 
public art galleries, which it is hoped, soon 
will be common, the village improvement 
in its various lines, play an important part 
as educational factors in the life of the 
people. The tendency for private enter- 
prise to take an interest in what has here- 
tofore been regarded as public work is a 
good sign, and the more this is done in 
the right spirit, the better for all. It is 
gratifying to note the interest taken in 
many places in the village green or city 
park, but it is not gratifying to note the 
almost universal neglect throughout Con- 
necticut accorded our railroad stations. 
The entrance to a town should be more 
worthy of it. There should be some 
means taken to remedy the appearance of 
what is usually the most unattractive spot 
in the town. An instance worthy of 
emulation in this respect is what has been 
done in the town of Norfolk in this state. 
Led by a few public spirited residents, 
who stood not upon precedents, but 
stepped boldly forth to a new order of 
things, the result is a model of its kind 
inside and out. The means necessary, to 
accomplish like results in other places will 
of course vary with the circumstances of 



each case. Every town has public spirited 
individuals who could and would do much 
more for the town's improvement in various 
ways with a little more encouragement of 
custom. In this respect Norfolk holds a 
prominent place. No town is a better 
example throughout, of public spirit by 
private individuals. Let their example be 
contagious. 

* * 

RAILROAD VINDICTIVENESS. 

The "Consolidated" road believes most 
thoroughly in the principle of " Living," 
but the " Letting live " is entirely another 
story. Its whole career is marked and 
marred by a series of petty persecutions 
of its competitors in business, . and its 
patrons also, that if recounted, would show 
as contemptible and disgraceful a record 
as one would care to contemplate. The 
latest of its achievements is the spiteful 
attempt to block the Central New England 
Railway Company's extension line to 
Springfield. By buying land to shut off 
the right of way, and then by securing 
injunctions through legal technicalities in 
defective charter rights, it has succeeded 
in delaying the completion of the line, but 
we hope in the name of common justice 
and for the best interests of the state that 
the delays will be of short duration. 



495 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



IN the year 1839 the town of Sharon, 
Conn., celebrated the first century of 
its existence, and an historical address was 
delivered by Gen. Charles F. Sedgwick. 
This address he elaborated and enlarged 
into a history of the town, which was pub- 
lished in 1842. Thirty-five years later 
a new edition was issued which soon be- 
came, like the first, one of the rare books 
of Connecticut history. And now the 
enterprise of Mr. Charles Walsh, a pub- 
lisher of Amenia, N. Y., has brought out 
a third edition of the little book. The 
addition of new material by way of appen- 
dices and the insertion of a number of 
illustrations have increased the size of this 
edition to an octavo of 200 pages. Mr. 
Sedgwick's work as an historian was well 
done, and is the only history of the town. 
The volume is for sale by the publisher in 
cloth binding at $2 per copy. 



One of the most persevering and care- 
ful historians of Connecticut to-day is 
Miss Ellen D. Lamed, author of a history 
of Windham County. Her pen seems to 
be ever busy ; in addition to the two 
volume county history, she has published 
numerous short sketches and magazine 
articles of historical value, and has pre- 
pared papers for various societies and 
gatherings. Nine of these sketches — 
several of them entirely new to the pub- 
lic — have now been published under the 
title Historic Gleanings in Windham 
County, Connecticut. The titles of the 
papers are Spent Lights, Windham Co. 
Women of Early Time, Other Lights, 
Revolutionary Echoes, Windham Co. and 
Province, A Life's Record, Dodge the 
Babbler, Our First Woman Artist, Japheth 
in Search of His Forefathers. It is only 
necessary to add that the book is written 
throughout in Miss Larned's usual enter- 
taining style. 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



The field day of the Connecticut Society 
Sons of the American Revolution at New 
London and Groton on the 6th of the 
present month calls up many thrilling in- 
cidents of our little state's history. The 
day was chosen in commemoration of the 
burning of New London by the British 
troops and the massacre of the garrison at 
Fort Griswold across the river from the 
town. On September 6, 1781, the British 
troops to the number of 1600 were landed 
in two equal parties, one of which attacked 
the town and the other the fort at Groton. 
The defenses of the town were of little 
account and the defenders few in number. 
The British headed by Arnold soon en- 
tered the town where they set fire to the 
principal dwellings and storehouses, des- 
troying 143 buildings, and to the shipping 
at the wharves. 

The other party attacked Fort Griswold 
on Groton Heights and after the garrison 
of 120 men had killed more than that 

496 



number of the enemy the fort was sur- 
rendered and occupied by the British who 
immediately committed acts of the most 
barberous and shocking brutality upon 
their defenseless prisoners. Two survivors 
of the scene, Rufus Avery and Stephen 
Hempstead wrote accounts of the sur- 
render which, with the narrative of Jona- 
than Rathun who arrived on the following 
day, were published in 1840- But for 
these accounts of eye witnesses we could 
hardly credit the stories which have come 
down to us. The killing of the com- 
mander Col. William Ledyard with his 
own sword by the officer who received it 
in surrender ; the firing by platoons into 
the heaps of the wounded ; the bayoneting 
of many ; the indescriminate piling of the 
wounded into a cart which ran down the 
steep hill until suddenly stopped by a tree 
— these and other incidents seem almost 
incredible as the acts of those whom we 
now look upon as one of the most enlight- 
ened and civilized peoples of the earth. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES AND 
POTPOURRI. 



When making returns to The Connecticut 
Magazine office, newsdealers will kindly 
affix business stamp to package, whether 
sent by mail or express and oblige. 

The Shumway Company of 739 Main 
Street, Hartford, has just issued an illustrated 
booklet, " Good Things for Housekeepers," 
which they will mail to any address free of 
charge, or will dispense to those calling at 
their office. In another part of the magazine 
a further explanation will be found. We 
advise reading it. 

Prize competitions are quite the thing 
nowadays, especially if there is sufficient 
recompense for the contestants. Pride 
figures largely in such competitions. The 
National Phonograph Company has arranged 
a $2000 prize competition to stimulate an 
active and critical interest in the Edison 
Phonograph records. For the details of the 
competition we refer our readers to the 
advertisement of The Hartford Grapho- 
phone Company. Edwin L. Northam, mana- 
ger, will explain the competition to our 
readers, personally, or by mail to any who 
choose to write him. 

The publisheis of The Connecticut Maga- 
zine desire names and addresses of persons 
out of the state, who might be interested in 
subscribing to the magazine. With this 
object in view we have utilized a column on 
the last advertising page of this issue, leav- 
ing blank spaces for names and addresses. 
We ask our readers to assist us in securing 
as many names as possible. The publishers 
will refund any postage that is required in 
sending us these names. 

It is not our mission to comment on 
styles, but inasmuch as there are many of 
the fair sex among are readers, we feel war- 
j ranted in calling their attention to the exhi- 
bition of high grade furs at 99-100 Pratt 
Street, the fur house of Alfred Williams & 
Son. This house has been in the fur busi- 
ness since 1843. They do not advertise to 
sell "cheap," but their motto is " small 
profits and first quality." 

The board of park commissioners of Hart- 
ford, recently left to Messrs. Russell and 
Fairfield the selection of suitable names for 
the old South Green and the new park, which 



Cbe J armington Uailey Sanatorium, ColUnwme ' 



Con 11. 



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lllllll - 




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The large, handsome house is very cheerful, airy, newly 
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the grounds, and on all sides are beauty and quiet. The 
pure spring water is plentiful, and the air invigorating. The 
drives in all directions are unsurpassed. References from 
patients cured and other information will be cheerfully given, 
on request. Address, I>r. F. U. Peltier, Hartford, Conn. 



CURES 
MALARIA 



NON-QUIN 

without producing dizziness or ringing in the ears 
BOX SENT to any address on receipt of 25 cts. All Druggists. 

NON-QUIN CO., Hartford, Conn. 



INSURED 
INVESTMENTS. 



Bristol, Conn., Nov. 12, 1898. 

Mr. E. C. Linn, Sec'y and Treas., 

The Connecticut Building and Loan Association, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Dear Sir; I am just in receipt of the check of 
the Association for $1,091.00, in payment of the 
maturity value of ten shares (insured class), held 
by my Lite husband, which also includes the reserve 
accumulations of the shares. 

I wish to thank you for your promptness in the 
settlement of this claim. Yours truly, 

Clara J. Clayton. 

$10 a month for 120 months produces $2,n00, 
which will be paid in cash upon maturity of shares, 
or at prior death the proceeds of the life insurance 
will be paid to heirs together with cash withdrawal 
value of shares. 

$850,000.00 
100,000.00 



Assets, Over, 

Guarantee Fund, (paid in Cash;, 



The Connecticut Building and 

Loan Association, 

252 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn* 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



METAL LATH. 

This article is fast superseding the wooden spruce lath for plas- 
tering. It is tire-proof, does not shrink and therei.y crack the 
plastering, and is exceedingly durable, takes less space and hoMs 
plaster the best. 

JOHN B. CLAPP & SON, 



61 Market Street, 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



AUCTIONS 



in all parts of 
the state. 



Sales conducted throughout the state on Real 
Estate, Land Plots, Farms, Live Stock, Store 
Stocks, Furniture, Art Sales, etc. Write me 
if you wish to sell. 



Howard C. Bestor, 



Hartford, Ct. 



€^ce^^. 



UTtcAA/: 



3.30 ro 78.30. 



zsorof 



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$ 



4- 



TAKE ELEVATO/f. 






RICHLY UPHOLSTERED 




ALL FREE 



Morris Chairs 
aud Couches; 
Writing Desks, Watches, Silver Tea Sets, 
etc., with our assortment sales of 

SOAPS. EXTRACTS and TOILET GOODS. 

Beautiful Catalogue mailed free. 
Premiums shown at our office. 

739 Main Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 



SHUMWAY CO , 



Combined lAT^iting sine! Copying Ink 

Equal to the Best 




But 



25 per cent. 
Cheaper. 

All kiuds and Colors. Ask 

your Dealer for it. 

'•Standard" Mucilage Sticks 

better than any other. 

BAIRSTOW INK CO., 

42 Union Place. Hartford, Conn. 



School Books, School Supplies, 

of all kinds — Kindergarten Goods, 
Wedding invitations and Visiting 1 
Cards a Specialty . All kinds of 
Fashionable Engraving. 

"Trolley Trips in Historic New England," 

PRICE, 10 CENTS. 

The BOOK Store. 



SMITH & McDONOUGH t 
30 J Main Street, . Hartford, Conn. 




Does Your Piano 
Look Blue? 

TRY 

DIAMOND 

HARD OIL POLISH. 



A housekeeper's necessity. Any- 
one can use it. Works like magic 
on furniture of all kinds. Warran- 
ted not to gum or hold the dust. 
Bottle to any address, 25 cts. 



Hartford Diamond Polish Co. 
n8 Asylum St., Htfd , Ct. 



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POTPOURRI - Continued. 

is now commonly known as South Park. 
The fact that a park much farther south had 
been laid out seemed to undo the title of South 
Green and it was decided after deliberation 
to name the old green " Barnard Park," after 
the Hon. Henry Barnard, who lives upon its 
border. The Barnard house has stood there 
for ninety years, it having been built by 
Chauncey Barnard, Dr. Barnard's father, two 
years before Dr. Barnard was born. 

The South Green used to be the central 
gathering point. Dr. Russell remembers 
going there with his father in 1824 to a cattle 
show, and being taken into the Barnard 
house, as his father wanted to see the father 
of Dr. Henry Barnard. The green was the 
exhibition place for circuses and the like for 
many years later, and between seasons the 
raised circle of the ring was visible in the 
middle of the green. No name has been 
determined upon as yet for the new south 
park. — Hartford Courant. 

We believe the system of leaving it entirely 
with the contractor as to finish of the wood, 
the selection of mantels, fireplaces, etc., in 
new homes is wrong. We should no sooner 
allow the contractor to specify the color or 
design of a fireplace or mantel than to tell 
us what kind of carpets or furniture we 
should have in the house. The fireplace and 
mantel are part of the furnishings and aid to 
such an extent in the attractiveness of the 
interior that it is wise for persons building a 
home for themselves to give this matter 
their close, personal attention. You will 
prefer to choose for yourself if you 
see the really interesting display of fire- 
places, mantels, andirons, etc., at The Hart- 
ford Mantel & Tile Company's establish- 
ment at 164 State Street, Hartford. — They 
will send a free illustrated catalogue to any 
address. 

Is it undignified to read advertisements ? 
Indeed, no. Is it undignified to say to a 
merchant that you saw his ad. in the Con- 
necticut Magazine ? Again, no. The mer- 
chant will be overjoyed to know it. Some 
of the brainiest men in the world of art 
devote their whole attention to creating 
designs for advertising. It requires brains 
to be original. An advertising artist's 
work, whose designs must of necessity 
be original, is entitled to the attention 
of the public as much as the painter 
(copier) of landscapes. The originality 



VISIT THE HIGH ART 

EXHIBITION 



.OF.. 




HIGH 
GRADE 

furs 



It will pay you to 
buy them zvhere 
they are made. 



Prices Right. 

Styles— 
Up-to-Date. 

ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS. 

Now is the time to have them done. 

Alfred Williams & Son, 

99-101 Pratt St., HARTFORD, CONN. 



Nobby Goods, 
Nobby Fit, 
Question is 
Who made it? 

Toothaker Brothers, 



They make garments for the best 
people in the state. 



Experience has taught 
the intelligent public who 
want proper suitings, 
proper jit and unvary- 
ing courtesy to look into 
their handsofne suite of 
rooms in the SAGE- 
ALLEN BLDG. 
Hartford, Conn. 




Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



This competition 
is open to any 
one sending us a 
2c stamp for 
application bl ank 
containing the 
eleven rules gov- 
erning the com- 
petition, and all 
other necessary 
information. 

To stimulate an 
active and critical 
interest in Edison 
Phonograph Records 
$2,000 is offered in 
prizes for the best 
descriptions of these 
Records. '1 his 
competition is 
arranged and guar- 
anteed by the Na- 
tional Phonograph 
Company by whom 
a book of explanation 
i* pr nted for 
distribution by the 

fiartford 
Grapbopboite 

£7* Ed win T. 
luv*t Northam, Mgr, 

80 Trumbull St., 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



Prize 

(OMPET/TM 



HISHOLINESS POPE LEO XIII 
AWARDS GOLD MEDAL 

In Recognition of Benefits Received from 










fJ'ifJill 



MARIANI WINE TONIC 

FOfi BOI?r. BJ?A/Mam WEAVES 

Spec/a i Oeeea - 7o a// w/?o wr/fe i/s /ne/?f/o/7 - 
/ng //?/s paper, we sen of a 6oo/fconfa/'n/ng por- 
fra/fo an of encforsements oSSa/pe/pops, £mppess, 
Pp//vcesSapd/mals, Arc/yb/shops, an of offter 'cf/sfm- 
gc//s/?eor personages. 

A/a/?/aa// & Co., 52 W£sr/5™Sr. /VewYopx. 

fOff SALE A7 AU DPUGG/STS EI/£AYW//Efi£ AMWSL/BSr/ri/rES. BEH/AftEOf/M/rAT/OAfS. 

Paa/s-4/ Sou/ewcr Hauss/najw. I DAWON'83Morf//7?erSf. Af o/?frea/ -87 Sr. James Sf. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 






POTPOURRI— Continued. 

and attractiveness of magazine advertise- 
ments is the secret of success in this line of 
advertising. 

There are many seekers after old furniture, 
bric-a-brac, etc., who go to a great expense 
to have such articles restored and made pre- 
sentable, but any article of furniture, old or 
new, requires attention from time to time, to 
keep the surface from cracking. There is a 
preparation called the Diamond Hard Oil 
Polish that accomplishes perhaps the best 
results in this line of any of the polishes. 
We have heard it highly recommended and | 
believe a bottle at 25 cents is a good invest- 
ment for anyone. It is prepared at 118 
Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Some time ago the United States govern- 
ment erected a statue at West Point to the 
memory of Major-General John Sedgwick, 
and nqw his last resting place in Cornwall 
village is to have an old field piece to mark 
it. 

Not long ago the government offered a 
howitzer to General Sedwick's family to be 
placed on or near the grave. The offer was 
accepted, and a howitzer has been sent to 
Cornwall. It is the largest and oldest piece 
of its kind in the possession of the govern- 
ment, and accompanied General Sedgwick in 
his Mexican and Southern campaigns. By 
permission of the town of Cornwall it will 
be mounted in the green opposite to the 
cemetery. The bronze work, including a 
portrait medallion of the general, will be 
done by Mr. James J. Hawley, a pupil of 
St. Gaudens, and now associated with Mr 
J. Massey Rhynal of New York. — Hartford 
Times. 

It is quite the proper thing among the 
present-day ladies to have all their stationery 
embellished with a handsome monogram, 
and it is a custom that commends itself 
favorably to one's notice. Wherever style 
exists you will invariably find the young lady 
eager to be up-to-date. Many of Hartford's 
best citizens already know of an establish- 
ment that has been producing engraving for 
the past forty years, and all these years in the 
same location. No doubt this business 
house could show many interesting cards 
engraved for men and women who have been 
gone many years A glance into the show- 
case tells you what a variety of work is 
done ; the cutting of address dyes, letter 
heads, monograms, calling and business 







„//•*„.„ 1 BH 




I --_-_ -~<_ 


leodor F.Gelbart. 
ROOM N?8 





There's Cheer 

IN A HANDSOME 

FIRE-PLACE. 

WE CARRY ALL SORTS OF . . 

MANTELS 




LOOK THEM 
OVER. 

FREE CATALOGUE. 

The HARTFORD MANTEL and TILE GO. 

L. M. GLOVER, Manager. 

Manufacturers and Manufacturers' Agents. 
Mosaics, Interior Marble and Slate; Gas Combination 
and Electric Light Fixtures; Fireplace Furniture of all 
Descriptions. 

164 State St., Hartford, Ct. Telephone Connection. 



W ONDERFU L 

Our Xew System of Development 
for MAN, WOMAN or CHILD. 

Develops every part of your body. 

Increases your vitality. 

Insures good health. 

Cures Insomnia, Dyspepsia and 

Nervousness. 

Send 4 cents iu stamps for Descriptive Circular. 
Add. Strength, Dept. A, Box 722, H'tf'd, Ct. 



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PRESERVE 

WMM QUARTERLIES 

They will make a valuable addition to 
your library v, hen they are bound. 

WE BIND THEM in Russia Back and Corners, 
Raised Bands, with Marble Paper Sides, $1.00 

Per Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Back and Corners, as above, $1.25 

All kinds and qualities of Magazine Binding. 

Blank Books of every description with flat opening backs. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 

HARTFORD, CONN, 



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can be engaged for Concerts, Religious and Social 
Entertainments, Funerals and work for Fraternal 
Orders. 
For terms, dates, etc., address William Richard Grif- 
fith, Bus. Man., 66 State St. Hartford, Conn. 




g^%\ First 

-r cost, 

f) Only 
Cost* 






No "Laundry 
Bills if you 
wear the 



Windsor 

jWJ Collars and Cuffs. 

« % A little Sapolio or Soap 

will clean them without 

ff ' '" injuring the goods 

Free Illustrated Catalogue to any address. 
Trade Mark 

TheWindsor Soods. 

Water Proof 

COLLARS, GUFFS, SHIRT FRONTS AND NECKTIES. 

We Want Agents Everywhere. 

The Windsor Collar & Cuff Co., 

Chicago, 111. Windsor, Conn. 




A "Weekly Paper Devoted to the Agriculturist 
in all matters pertaining to the 



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Subscription Price $1 00 per year. 
From date to Jan. J, 1900, 25 cents. 
SPECIAL OFFER— From date to Jan. l t 
1901, $1.00. 

Send for Sample Copy. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



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POTPOURRI- Continued. 

cards, wedding invitations and the like. 
Mr. Theodore Gelbart is the proprietor — 
his place 863 Main Street, Hartford. 

The subject of physical development in 
relation to health has of late years played a 
very important part in the welfare of the 
American people. 

A healthy body is indespensible to what- 
ever vocation a person is called, and a 
healthy body is only maintained by some 
form of exercise. .w-..: »-^p-H- % 

Light exercise, taken regulaily every day 
is advocated as one of the best means of 
keeping the system in good running order. 

The new system advertised by the 
" Strength " people, which does not require 
the use of any apparatus is the most com- 
plete and efficient method ever put before 
the public. Four cents in stamps secures 
an illustrated descriptive circular. Address 
"Strength," Dept. A, Box 722, Hartford, Ct. 

In all the walks of life there is a demand 
for men of experience. The public confides 
in such men. The world is crowded with 
pretenders who try one thing, then another, 
and never make a success of anything. We 
might cite a meritorious example of success 
gained through experience which in turn was 
acquired by perseverence along one line. 
Mr. Henry G. and Mr. Horace W. Toothaker, 
brothers, each of whom has devoted over 
half a generation to studying the require- 
ments in wearing apparel for men, haVe so 
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public that any hour of the day finds some 
prominent man of our state selecting his 
season's wardrobe in their handsome suite 
of rooms in the Sage-Allen Building, Hart- 
ford. 

In a recent issue we announced that the 
Wolcott Library Association had purchased 
of Mr. Samuel Marsh of New York the place 
known as the Gates Corner. Last week it 
became publicly known that John A. Van- 
derpoel of New York, would erect there a 
handsome building in memory of his grand- 
mother, the late Mrs. William Curtis Noyes. 
It will be for the use of the Library and the 
Historical Society and will be known as the 
" Noyes Memorial Building." 

This is a most fitting tribute to one who 
was not only of Litchfield ancestry but who 
spent her summers here in the old family 
house, the Major Talmadge place on North 




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POTPOURRI— Con tiuued. 

street. Mrs. Noyes loved Litchfield and its 
people and it was only natural that she 
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upon his wise choice of a memorial and on 
behalf of the town we extend to him our 
heartiest thanks for his great generosity. It 
is also extremely fitting that the architect 
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'here. 

Litchfield has long needed just such a 
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should be located right where the first Tem- 
perance Society in the United States, if not 
in the world was organized. 

— Litchfield Enquirer. 
July 5, 1899. 



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Vol. V. 



October, 1899 



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Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



OCTOBER, 1899. 



vol. v. CONTENTS. No. jo. 



The Cove from Lovers Leap, (Frontispiece.) 

New Milford. Illustrated. Dwight C. Kilbourn, 499 
List of Burials, Center Church Burying Ground, Hartford. Annotated by Mary K. Talcott, 520 

When Last I Close My Eyes. Poem. J. A. Spaulding, 525 

Samuel Johnson, Jr., and his Dictionaries. Henry Pynchon Robinson, 526 

Extracts from the Diary of Dr. Mason F. Cogswell. Compiled by Ellen Strong Bartlett, 532 

Indian Pipe. Poem. Elizabeth Alden Curtis, 537 

Departments. — Genealogical Department. 538 

Book Notes. 540 



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' "111 fares the land, to hastening ills a prey. 
Where wealth accumulates, and men decay. 
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34 



The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. 5. 



October, 1899. 



No. 10. 



NEW MILFORD. 



BY DWIGHT C. K1LBOURN. 



S early as 1671 the colo- 
, y"% \\ w T nists of Stratford discov- 
A% \\ ;; ered the beautiful lands 
A m*// T at Wyantenock, and 
bought them of some of 
the Indians for "one 
piece of good cloth and other good pay." 
These lands were seven miles in length 
and three miles in breadth each side of 
the Great river and adjacent to and north 
of the island which is just below Great 
Falls, where a Mr. Goodyear had some 
years previously established a trading post. 
The people of Stratford became involved 
in considerable difficulty about their 
church matters ; some of the ministers 
desired to preach a sermon two hours in 
length, while some of the brethren wanted 
to limit it to an hour and a half, and the 
trouble broadened into matters of doctrine 
until one faction seceded and emigrated 
northerly. Some of them went to Pom- 
peraug, now Woodbury, of whom we have 
a full record, others followed up the Great 
river to Wyantenock, of whom we have no 
records and it is impossible to tell just 
how many of them there were. 

499 



Meanwhile the Colony of Milford en- 
tered the field, and obtained permission 
of the General Court to buy lands of 
Indians. So they in 1702 bought substan- 
tially these same lands of other Indians, 
and proceeded to divide them into 109 
rights, which was accomplished in 1706. 

The printed history of the settlement 
of this plantation is entirely from the 
Milford point of view ignoring completely 
the Stratford colonists except an occa- 
sional allusion to the name. 

John Noble of Westfield, Mass., ac- 
quired one of these Milford rights and in 
1707 wandered through the woods to the 
place where his vast possessions lay. With 
him went his little daughter Sarah, nine 
years old, and also his son John, Jr., a 
young man, and these are called the first 
settlers — yet they found Zechariah Ferris 
ploughing on his Stratford right near 
where the present Town Hall is, and Mr. 
John Read and his family were living in a 
log house that stood near or on the pres- 
ent site of the Ingleside School. 

Undaunted and undismayed he erected 
his house of logs and clay a little distance 



,oo 



NEW MILFORD. 





THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

from the other dwellers, near where the 
present Memorial Church stands, and be- 
gan his pioneer life. It was not a howling 
wilderness — some one before him had 
cleared considerable land and the Indian 
fires had kept the brush and trees from 
growing. At the foot of the hill westerly, 
peacefully flowed, as 
now, the ''Great 
river," and beyond it 
on the plain beneath 
the mountain was the 
broad "Indian field" 
where grew the 
maize and fruits of 
the partially civilized 
red men. 

Bye and bye John 
Rostwick with his 
son John came from 
Stratford by the way 
of Derby and became 
a neighbor. He was 
of the Read and Fer- 



ris faction. In six years there were twelve 
families in the plantation and this rapid 
accession of population so frightened Mr. 
John Read that he sued the Milford 
claimants before the General Court for 
trespass upon his domains. He had six- 
teen lawsuits in succession from 1708 to 
1 7 10, and gained his cause fifteen times, 
but lost it on the sixteenth trial. Then 
abandoning litigation he tried persuasion 
and petitioned the General Court for 
relief. His petition is so quaint that we 
copy it : 

'• To ye Coll. Genii. Assembly at New 
Haven, Oct., A. D., 17 10. 

May it please ye Honbl : Court : Mis- 
fortune in my adventures have undone me 
utterly, for as I tho't, with a prudent fore- 
sight, I purchased abt. twenty thousand 
acres of land at Wiantenock, parcell of a 
purchase obtained thirty nine — recorded 
37 years past, last Genii. Court time in Colo- 
ny records ; had spent much to settle and 
defend it ; settled some inhabitants with 
me ye after I had tryed the title and re- 
corded ; finally agst home pretenders to it 
by a late patt't sixteen times I have been 
to Court and had tryails about it. even 
gained finally till ye last Court Assistants 
wherein I lost finally and am utterly dis- 
couraged and broken • finding two things, 
first yt I am not able to maintain suits 




THE QUAKER MEETING-HOUSE. 



NEW MILFORD. 



501 



forever, yt Indian titles are grown into 
utter contempt, yt as the times are I must 
fail — these things make we weary of the 
world. 

Wherefore I pray, seeing I nor my 
father have had one foot of land bv divi- 



living and pray for your health & prosper- 
ity with great content. Jno Read." 

This petition was favorably acted upon 
and Mr. John Read, to sooth his wounded 
spirit, was allowed about twenty thousand 




3^r --s» 







THE GREAT FALLS AND GORGE. 



sion or grant of Town or County, tho' 
spending all our days in it : that I may 
have liberty if I can find a place in 
the Colony (wch I know not yet) not 
granted to nor purchased by any, yt by 
your allowance I may purchase it, and 
settle it with some others, my friends, 
where in obscurity, we may get a poor 



acres in another locality, part of which is 
now the town of Redding. 

After this the plantation filled up rapidly 
with settlers, was incorporated as a town 
in 1 712, and received its name of New 
Milford. The settlers used Mr. Read's 
house as a place of worship for several 



K02 



NEW MILFORD. 



years, Mr. Read himself preaching in it 
oc casionally. This man's history is quite 
int eresting ; he was a grandson of John 
Read, a settler of Rehobeth. R. I., was 



and one of his children was the celebra- 
ted Col. John Read of Redding. During 
his residence in New Milford and while 
his lawsuits were progressing he was ad- 














born in 1673, graduated at Cambridge in 
169 7, studied divinity and became a dis- 
cing uished preacher. He married Ruth, 
daughter of Maj. John Talcott of Hartford 



mitted as an attorney and for some little 
time both preached and practiced, and 
was frequently appointed by the General 
Court as Queen's or King's attorney and 



NEW MILFORD. 



503 



in various other public Colonial matters. 
He finally removed to Boston and became 
unquestionably the leading lawyer of his 
day. He died there in 1749. 

Litchfield County was organized in 
1752 and New Milford became, as it still 
is, its southwestern town. It is situated 
upon both sides of the Housatonic River, 
about forty miles from its mouth. The 
river enters at the northwest corner and 
running an irregular course for nearly 
twenty miles leaves it at the southeast 
corner, and furnishes magnificent water 
power should it be 
required. The town 
originally com- 
prised a very large 
territory ; but from 
its first bounds have 
been taken about 
all of the present 
town of Brookfield, 
the New Preston 
part of the town of 
Washington, and 
the whole of the 
town of Bridge- 
water, fo r m e rly 
known as the Ship- 
pauge Neck or sim- 
ply "The Neck" 
and yet with all of 

these abstractions it is now twelve miles 
long by five to eight wide. 

It was the chief seat of the Indians of 
Western Connecticut, and the sachem had 
his palace near the Great Falls. This was 
constructed of barks, curiously held to- 
gether, the smooth side inwards, which a 
distinguished Indian artist had ornamented 
with pictures of all known species of beasts, 
birds, fishes and insects, making it a kind 
of natural history room. It is said that 
this chief, the great Waramaug, had about 
two hundred warriors directly under his 
command, and that the other neighboring 



tribes, the Pomperaugs, the Bantams, 
Piscatacooks and Weataugues, were also 
under his authority. Together they made 
a very formidable opposition to the incur- 
sions of the fierce Mohawks, when they 
went on the war path, or took a trip to 
the waters of the Sound. Now Waramaug 
was a good Indian, even before his death, 
and his subjects were far in advance of the 
other Indians in raising crops, fishing with 
nets, and building their wigwams. Prob- 
ably he and they had gained a good deal 
in their contact with the whites who 




THE ROGER SHERMAN HALE. 



occasionally visited them, and a trading 
post at Goodyear's Island had for years 
provided them a market for their surplus 
products of the forests and furnished them 
with implements and clothes ; but it was 
when he came to die that the Indian 
sachem's best qualities were discovered. 
Parson Boardman took him in hand, and 
christianized him so that he died in the 
faith. The Rev. Boardman writes thus of 
him : " That distinguished sachem, whose 
great abilities and eminent virtues, joined 
with his extensive dominion rendered him 
the most potent prince of that or any 



NEW MILFORD. 



505 



other day in this Colony ; and his name 
ought to be recorded by the faithful his- 
torian, as much as that of any crowned 
head since his was laid in the dust." He 
was probably buried in the Indian burial 
place near there, and a monument, which 
has within recent years been removed, 
was erected to his memory on Falls 
mountain. 

So the Indian memories of the region 
are inseparably blended in the mind with 
the romantic scenery near the Great Falls. 
History tells us that these falls were 
formerly one hundred and forty feet high 
instead of only seventeen, as at present, 
and were farther down stream. Just 
below them, the river has worn its way 
through the mountain forming a most 
picturesque gorge, then suddenly spread- 
ing out into a broad 
basin, called the 
Cove, once noted 
for its being a great 
fishing place, at the 
farther end of 
which is Goodyear's 
Island. In their 
deeds of the land 
to the whites the 
Indians reserved 
their fishing rights 
here and returned 
each year at the 
proper season to 
fish for lamprey 
eels and shad until 

within the memory of those now living. 
These fishing rights the white man always 
recognized and respected. 

Not far from here run the waters of Still 
river, passing through the little village of 
Lanesville and emptying into the Great 
river just above the falls. This stream 
comes from Danbury ten miles distant and 
has scarcely any current until it nears its 
mouth, when it passes down the limestone 



rocks making the falls where David Gris- 
wold and his son Jacob were in 17 14 
induced to come from Wethersfield and 
establish a grist mill, thus saving the in- 
habitants the long journey with their 
grain to Derby, Woodbury or Danbury. 
Other manufacturing as the years rolled 
by, was added to it, but all the buildings 
are now in ruins. 





ALL SAINTS' MEMORIAL CHURCH. 



SI. JOHN'S 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



Halt a mile west 
from these ruins is 
the old Quaker 
Church, built about 
1805, an d its grave- 
yard adjoining. 
Formerly there 
were a number of 
Quakers in this vi- 
cinity ; now there are none. They had 
other buildings for worship previous to 
this one. Their society was first formed 
in 1 73 1 when sundry members of the First 
Church " fell away" to Quakerism, as the 
Rev. Daniel Boardman phrased it. 

Concerning the erection of the building 
now standing we read in Orcutt's history, 
"When this meeting-house was raised, tra- 
dition says, the number of members of the 



506 



NEW MILFORD. 



society being small, it was feared there 
would not be men enough to put up the 
frame, and hence the news was circulated 
that Ezra Noble would be present in a 
one-horse 
wagon. This 
drew a large 
number of 
people, for 
not only was 
it the first 
wagon of 
the kind in- 
t roduc ed 
into the 
town, but 
many de- 
clared that 
a wagon 
could not 



The Quakers were a thrifty and consci- 
entious people, leaving a good record 
here as they do wherever they are known. 
There are several Quaker weddings re- 




STREET AND GREEN. 



be made light enough to bear a load and 
at the same time strong enough to be 
drawn by one horse. Two-horse wagons 
had been introduced about twenty years 
before." 



nesses, one 
as late as 
1822. One 
of the earli- 
est of these 
give: 

" Whereas 
John Ferris 
of New Mil- 
ford in the 
County of 
New Haven, 
sonofZach- 
ariah Ferris 
and Sarah 
his wife, 
and Abigail 
Tryon of New Milford having declared 
their intention of marriage with each 
other before the monthly meeting of the 
people called Quakers at Mamaroneck 
according to the good order used amongst 
them, whose proceedings therein, after 



NEW MILFORD. 



507 



deliberate consideration thereof, and hav- 
ing consent of parents, and nothing ap- 
pearing to hinder: These may therefore 
certify all whom it may concern that for 
the accomplishing their said intention, 
this fifteenth day of ye third month in the 
year one thousand seven hundred and 



promising to be unto her a true and loving 
husband till death shall make a separation, 
and then and there in the same assembly 
ye said Abigail Tryon did in like manner 
declare that she did take the said John 
Ferriss to be her husband, promising to be 
to him a true and loving wife until death 





thirty-eight, the said John Ferriss and 
Abigail Tiyon presented themselves in 
public meeting of the said people and 
others at the house of Joseph Ferris in 
New Milford and then and there the said 
John Ferris taking the said Abigail Tryon 
by the hand and did in a solemn manner 
declare that he did take her to be his wife, 



shall separate them ; and moreover ye said 
John Ferris and Abigail Tryon there, ac- 
cording to the custom of marriage, she 
assuming the name of her husband, as a 
further consideration thereof did then and 
there to these presents set their hands, 
and we whose names are hereunder sub- 
scribed being amongst others at the 



5o8 



NEW MIL FORD. 




RESIDKNCE OF MRS. GEORGE W. WRIGHT 



solemnizing of the said marriage and sub- 
scription as above said, have also as 
witnesses set our hands to these presents. 

John Ferriss. 
her 
Abigail — Ferriss. 
mark. 
Witnesses : 

her 



ment was made 
with Rev. Daniel 
Boardman and he 
was ordained to be 
their minister. 
Among other things 
in the agreement 
was one to the 
effect that the soci- 
ety should dig a 
well for the minister 
which they accord- 
ingly did and it is 
still in existence on 
the grounds of Mrs. 
W. D. Black's house 
lot. 

The first meeting- 
house for this society stood in what is 
now the highway above the north end of 
the present green. It was not completed 



Jane Try on, 
Richard Cornwell, 
Nathan Gaylord, 
Peter Thatcher, 
Samuel Bolls, 
Daniel Prindle, 
Daniel Farrand, 

her 
Martha | Prindle, 

mark 
Joseph Rodman, 
Thomas Weller, 
Richard Hallet, 
Joseph Rennels, 



Hannah H Talcott, 

mark 
John Prindle, 
Daniel Prindle, 
Ziba Tryon, 
Sarah Ferriss, 
Joseph Ferriss, 
Benja. Ferriss, 
Zachariah Ferriss, 
James Tryon, 
Oliver Tryon, 
Nathan Talcott, 

her 
Sarah) — (Noble, 

mark 
Samuel Prindle — 25. 

The legal or Congregational Church, 
from which the Quakers " fell away," was 
formally organized in 17 16. There was 
the usual petition to the General Court 
and the permission obtained, the usual 
steps toward the settlement of a minister, 
which was accomplished when an agree- 




METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



NEW MIL FORD. 



509 



until 1722 or 1723 and the society built 
a second meeting-house in 1754. The 
present edifice was built in 1833. This 
church has had a rather remarkable 
history when the dissensions of Quakers, 
Episcopalians and Separatists are taken 
into account, and many of the pastors 
have been men of mark who have left an 
honorable and enduring record. Such, 
besides the Rev. Boardman, have been 
Rev. Nathaniel Taylor, his successor and 



m, &*e£t' 






Mr. Wm. D. Black and the building 
erected by Mrs. David C. Sanford as a 
memorial to her husband, Judge Sanford. 
The church is of native stone, exquisite 
in design and furnished with a chime of 
twelve bells. The interior decorations 
and furnishings are costly with some un- 
usually fine glass and brass work. 

The Methodist Episcopal Society has 
an edifice on Elm Street, and near by is 
the Roman Catholic church. 

To matters 
ofeducation 
as well as re- 
ligion our 
forefathers 
paid much 
attention 
and they 
early estab- 
li s h ed a 







pastor for 
fifty-two 
years, Rev. 
Stanley 
Griswold, 
Rev. Noah 
Porter, and 
others. 

The Epis- 
copal Church 
has been an 

important religious body in New Milford 
from the time of the formation of their 
society in 1743, when twelve churchmen 
petitioned and obtained a grant of land 
from the town whereon to build a church 
of England. Their present beautiful St. 
John's Church was finished in 1882. In 
1880 a number of communicants withdrew 
from St. John's and in 1882 and 1883 All 
Saints' Memorial Church was built for their 
house of worship. The site was given by 



AT THF, FAIR. 

school system in New Milford which has 
left a worthy record. 

Their enterprise has been manifest in 
other public works from the time they 
built the " great bridge " in 1 737, the first 
bridge built over the Housatonic between 
this place and Long Island Sound, down 
through the years when they had to build 
other bridges and supply boats as ferries 
to take the places of the first and still 
later bridges that were carried away by 



5io 



NEW MIL FORD. 




ROMAN CATHOUC CHURCH. 

reshets. They took under consideration 
in 1822 the project of building the Ousa- 
tonic Canal through the Housatonic Val- 
ley from tide-water 
to the state line at 
Canaan, and later in 
1827 another plan 
for a canal was pro- 
jected from New 
Milford to the 
Sound at Sauga- 
tuck. These pro- 
jects never materia- 
lized, partly on ac- 
count of many of 
the New Milford 
people giving their 
attention to the set- 
tlement of the 
Western Reserve in 
Ohio. 



In 1840 they took an active part in the 
building of the Housatonic Railroad which 
was opened by an excursion train from 
Bridgeport to New Milford, February it, 
1840. The historian's account of the 
event is as follows: "The people came 
from all parts of the country and waited 
until late in the afternoon, on a cold winter's 
day, and some went home before the train 
came ; but finally it made its appearance 
to the great pleasure of the interested 
multitude. In the expression of the ap- 
preciation of the event the church bells 
were rung with much earnestness, and the 
old cannon, located on the rocks then 
south of the village houses, poured forth 
its thunder of welcome to the screaming 
railroad-steam-engine-whistle." 

Among those largely interested in the 
Western lands was Hon. Elijah Boardman, 
a grandson of Rev. Daniel Boardman, and 
one of the most prominent men of New Mil- 
ford. He became a merchant in the town 
and in 1793 built the house now owned 
and occupied by Mrs. Cornelia E. Wright, 
his granddaughter. In this house is a full 
length portrait of himself and one of his 
wife, who was Mary Anna Whiting of 




THE HENRY W. BOOTH PTACE. 



NEW MILFORD. 



5ii 




HON. ELIJAH BOARDMAN. 

Great Barrington, Mass. In the quaint 
one of his wife may be seen their eldest 
son as a child by her side, and it is 
interesting to think of this child becoming 
in later years Judge William Whiting 
Boardman, prominent in his profession 
and the business interests of New Haven, 




a member of the state legislature and a 
.United States congressman. 

Besides the large interests of the Hon. 
Elijah Boardman in Ohio, where the town 
of Boardman still perpetuates his memory, 
he served his town and state for several 
terms in the General Assembly both in the 
Lower and Upper Houses, and as a 
United States senator. 




HON. DAVID CURTIS SANFORD. 



MARY ANNA WHITING BOARDMAN 
AND SON. 

New Milford was the home of another 
United States senator, also, Hon. Perry 
Smith, and at an earlier date Roger Sher- 
man, who became nationally the most dis- 
tinguished of her residents, lived here for 
a number of years. He came here as a 
shoemaker, and the old shop in which he 
worked is yet in existence. He rose to 
the rank of a land surveyor and many of 
the plots of his surveys are on the town 



512 



NEW MIL FORD. 




RESIDENCE OF HON. I. B. BRISTOL 



records made by his own hands. He was 
a man of tremendous energy and industry, 
studied for the law and was admitted to 
the bar. He was a county judge and 
Representative at several sessions of the 
Assembly ; was chosen Governor's Assis- 
tant and appointed Judge of the Superior 
Court, which office 
he held twenty - 
three years; a 
member of the first 
Continental Con- 
gress and continu- 
ing a member of 
Congress nineteen 
years, until his 
death, being in the 
Senate the last two 
years. He was a 
member of the com- 
mittee to prepare 
the Declaration of 
Independence o f 
which document he 
was one of the sign- 
ers, a member of residence of mrs. e 



the committee to 
prepare articles of 
Confederation, a 
member of the Gov- 
ernor's Council of 
Safety in Connec- 
ticut, and of the 
convention which 
formed the Consti- 
tution of the United 
States. 

In the senate of 
the United States in 
1847, John C. Cal- 
houn of South Caro- 
lina said, " That it 
was owing mainly 
to the states of Con- 
necticut and New 
Jersey that we had 
a federal instead of a national govern- 
ment ; the best government imtead of 
the most intolerable on earth. Who 
are the men of these states to whom we 
are indebted for this admirable govern- 
ment? I will name them; their names 
ought to be engraven on brass and live 







F. SHEPARD. 



NEW MILFORD. 



5'3 



forever. They were 
Chief Justice Ells- 
worth and Roger 
Sherman of Connec- 
ticut and Judge Pat- 
terson of New Jersey. 
To the coolness and 
sagacity of these 
three men, aided by 
a few others not so 
prominent, we owe 
the present constitu- 
tion." 

On the front of the 
Town Hall in New 
Milford, recently 
named the Roger 
Sherman Hall, is a 
brass tablet bearing 
these words : 

" On the site of this 
building once lived 

Roger Sherman 
Born 1 72 1 — Died 1793 
One of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. 





lotos lodge 



SUMMER RESIDENCE OF H. L. 
LAKE WARAMAUG. 



35 



RESIDENCE OF GEORGE H. DINES. 

Placed by the Roger Sherman 
Chapter Daughters of the 
American Revolution." 
Of the many other honorable and 
worthy residents of the town we can men- 
tion but few. The Hines were a notable 
family from the time James Hine, the first 
settler of that 
name, came from 
Milford in 1726. 
Squire Abel Hine, 
his son, was a 
synonym for in- 
tegrity and punct- 
uality, and Beebe 
Hine and Anan 
Hine were among 
those of the fam- 
i 1 y who were 
prominent. Anan 
Hine was for a 
number of years a 
merchant in the 
town and a boy 
coming along and 
reading his name 
on his sign inter- 
preted it thus : 



RANDALL, 



514 



NEW MILFORD. 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. G. E. PIXI,EV 



"Ann, Ann Hine, — two old maids." 
David Sherman Boardman was another 
member of the Boardman family deserv- 
ing mention, so long identified with the 
town and so well versed in what pertained 
to its history and the lives of its people. 
Col. Elisha Bostwick, for fifty-two years 
was town clerk, to 
whom for his well 
kept records and 
other services pos- 
terity owes a debt 
of gratitude. In 
the legal profession 
David Curtis San- 
ford, for ten years, 
and until his death 
in 1884, a judge of 
the Supreme Court, 
held a high and 
honored place in 
his town and state. 
The second min- 
ister in point of 
time was the Rev. 
Nathaniel Taylor residence 



who married the 
daughter of the first 
minister, the Rev. 
Daniel Boardman. 
Among the direct 
lineal descendants 
of " Priest Taylor," 
as he was always 
called, was the Rev. 
Dr. Nathaniel W. 
Taylor, for many 
years pastor of the 
Center Church of 
New Haven,and the 
founder of the new 
school of Congre- 
gational theology. 
It was by his side 
that the Rev. Dr. 
Lyman Beecher de- 
sired to be buried. Besides those men- 
tioned and many other representatives of 
the same family names, among those who 
have been prominent in helping to make 
New Milford what it is, the names of 
Noble, Canfield, Booth, Bennitt, Lines, 
Soule, McMahon, Mygatt, Pickett, Ran- 




OF GEORGE W. ANTHONY, P. M. 



NEW MILFORD. 



5*5 



dall, Ruggles, Bald- 
win, Bristol, Merwin 
and Starr hold a 
conspicuous place. 
No mention of 
New Milford can 
be complete with- 
out recalling the 
memory of William 
D. Black. Retiring 
from New York 
where he had con- 
ducted business as 
a member of the 
firm of Ball, Black 
& Co., he came to 
live in New Milford 
as his home about 
1874, and soon be- 
came one of its most 
prominent citizens 
— foremost in pub- 
lic spirit and in works tending to the real 
elevation of life in the village and vicinity. 
Mr. Black died in 1889, and will long be 
remembered as an active and liberal 
citizen in promoting those street, side- 





THK COLONEE TAYLOR PLACE. 



walk, electric light and park improve- 
ments which have made New Milford so 
charming. 

One of the old residents now living is 
Col. William J. Starr, now more than 
ninety years old. 
His homestead has 
been in the family 
since 1764 and is 
the village resi- 
dence of an active 
farmer. In his 
time he has seen 
the transformations 
that have made this 
once uncouth, un- 
pleasant and wild 
looking village one 
of the gems of New 
England towns. 
The center street, a 
swampy hole with a 
muddy brook driz- 






RESIDENCE OF A. H. MCMAHON, 



zling through it, a 



5*6 



NEW MILFORD. 



public pasture, has become a smooth lawn 
with broad concrete sidewalks and beauti- 
ful shade trees. Col. Starr holds his mili- 
tary title by being colonel of a Connecticut 
Militia Regiment for fourteen years, and 
his stories of those great times, the May 
muster and then the General Training in 
October at Litchfield are very interesting. 
What wonderful days those were, no pomp 
and circumstance of war in modern times 
can equal them. I have seen an hundred 
thousand men in arms pass in review be- 



The Colonel is a frequent witness in 
the courts in questions relating to old 
roads, fences and land boundaries, and 
when he begins to tell of matters seventy 
or eighty years ago it is amusing to watch 
the judge's face as if doubting his know- 
ledge, until he asks him his age when the 
look of doubt changes to one of interest. 

It is interesting to ride with him about 
town and hear him tell of the past. He 
is as active as a boy and is fond of wit and 
jokes. He is a large land owner and owns 




Jti' 




NEW MII.FORD HAT CO. 



fore a nation's President, but no officer in 
that grand parade could put on the style of 
the Captain of the Blues or the Union 
Rifles as he drew his saber and saluted the 
Colonel on the Center Square at Litch- 
field, and the Colonel himself with those 
long gauntlet gloves and high topped boots 
on that prancing black horse — was there 
ever such majesty or high-mightiness ! 

Nathaniel Wheeler of Bridgeport, used 
to say that Colonel Starr was the finest 
looking officer on the finest horse that he 
ever saw. 



very much of the " Indian field " on the 
west side of the Great river and says if he 
only owned a certain four acre lot he 
would be one of the rarest property owners 
in the world, in that he would own all of 
the land that joins him. In one of his 
lots is a large limestone rock with two 
deep water worn holes in the top like the 
impressions of a couple of feet. Directly 
opposite on the other side of the river is a 
high peak at the end of Long Mountain, 
and some one has said that when they ran 
the devil out of Kent he jumped from the 



NEW MIL FORD. 



517 



top of this peak over the river and landed 
on this stone thus making these impres- 
sions. The Colonel says it may be true, 
but he never knew when the old Nick 
left Kent. 

The modern town of New Milford is 
in many respects a remarkable one. It 
has a population of nearly six thousand 
inhabitants and is almost entirely an 
agricultural community. The principal 
industry which brings ready cash has been 
for many years the raising of tobacco. 
Each one has a few acres of fine rich land 
upon which he spends all of his energy 
from April to September in growing a 
crop of tobacco. The cutting, curing and 
preparing for market of this crop during 
the fall and winter months gives employ- 
ment to a large number of workmen and 
several large warehouses are used for as- 
sorting and packing this product. 

For nearly twenty years New Milford 
has claimed an important part in the 
great hat industry of the country. In 
1 88 1 the manufacture of hats was started 
by Mr. J. E. Bates and Mr. S. S. Green, 
a stock company being organized in 1888 





THE LIBRARY. 



COIyONEIv WIUJAM J. STARR. 

to continue the business, which had grown 
extensively. The burning of the plant in 
September, 1898, necessitated the con- 
struction of a new factory, which is a 
model establishment. The building 
throughout is modern and 
the equipment is such that 
the factory is now producing 
150 dozen stiff Derbys yearly, 
which find a ready market 
in every part of the country. 
Mr. Seymour S. Green is 
secretary and treasurer, Mr. 
William G. Green, superin- 
tendent, and Mr. John E. 
Bates, manager of the New 
York office ; Andrew G. 
Barnes of New Milford is 
president. To these gentle- 
men belong the credit of 
furnishing employment for 
235 operatives in a business 
that is said to surpass any 
stiff hat enterprise in New 



5i8 



NEW MILFORD. 



England. A short distance south of the 
town there is a pottery works, and at the 
Great Falls there are the extensive works 
of the Bridgeport Wood Finishing Com- 
pany. There are one or two other small 
establishments besides the usual carriage 
repairing and blacksmith shops of a 
country town. 

The building of the Housatonic Rail- 
road in 1840, caused this town to be the 



time stages run to Bridgewater, New 
Preston and Sherman. 

As a convenience to the farmers out- 
side, the village has constructed a large 
number of public horse sheds, thus enab- 
ling them to have a comfortable place, for 
their teams while attending to their busi- 
ness in town. 

Three hotels open their doors and pro- 
vide for the comfort of the strangers within 




INGIvESIDK SCHOOL. 



center of a large country trade and at the 
present time it has several large well 
stocked stores which are daily resorted to 
by customers from the surrounding coun- 
try. For many years it was the terminus 
of important stage lines, the one from 
Litchfield, twenty miles distance being the 
most important as it brought mails and 
passengers not only from Litchfield but 
from Woodville, New Preston, Marble- 
dale and Northville. At the present 



their gates ; the New Milford hotel near 
the railroad depot, the New England 
House, facing the center square, and the 
Wayside Inn on Aspetuck Hill are all 
pleasant well kept hostelries. 

A very handsome library building has 
recently been occupied which was mainly 
paid for by a bequest from the late Egbert 
Marsh. In it rooms are provided for the 
meetings of the G. A. R. 

The educational privileges are of a high 



NEW MIL FORD. 



519 



order ; a fine graded 
school, with a high 
school room, furnish- 
es education for the 
general public ; a well 
appointed kindergar- 
ten provides for the 
younger children. 
The Rectory School 
for Boys, under the 
charge of Harvey E. 
Taylor offers home 
discipline and a 
thorough preparation 
for business or col- 
lege. The Ingleside 
School for Girls, 

under the direct care and supervision of 
Mrs. William D. Black, its patroness, has 
already gathered girls from twenty-two 
states and Canada, and ranks high among 
the leading institutions of this kind in the 
country. With a well chosen corps of 
specialists, a curriculum extending over 
into the college course, the school has in 
the seven years of its existence acquired 




HICKORY HEARTH." RESIDENCE OF MRS. WIEEIAM D. BEACK. 
On site of the first house built in the village of New Milford. 



a generous patronage among the wealthy 
and cultivated class. Both of these 
boarding schools have day pupils, and 
have done much in raising t*he literary 
tone of the town. 

Such is New Milford — a typical Con- 
necticut town, and a worthy representative 
of the land of the steady habits. 




MAIN STREET SHOWING OED EEMS. 



LIST OF BURIALS, CENTER CHURCH BURYING 
GROUND, HARTFORD. 



ANNOTATED BY MARY K. TALCOTT. 



802. 

Aug. 10 Child of Deen. 

21 Joseph Whipell charged the 

Town, aged 45 years. 

22 Wife of Charles Way, charged 

the Town. 
Sept. 3 Samuel Marsh [son of Nathaniel 
and Thankful (Goodwin) 
Marsh, bapt. May 9, 1731], 
aged 91 years. 
8 Child of Ebenezer Speers. 

16 Aaron Bradley [son of John and 

1 Mercy (French) Bradley, born 

in Guilford, Sept. 5, 1742], 

aged 61 years. 
18 Child of Archer Collom, aged 2 

years. 
18 Son of Mary Barnard [Bpaphras 

son of William], aged 11 years. 
26 Wife of Joseph Burr, aged 32 

years. 
15 Child of Joseph Winship, aged 1 

year. 
Oct. 15 Mary Carter, [widow] aged 86 

years. 

17 Jemimy Scott, charged the Town, 

aged 63 years. 

23 John Porter, aged 29 years. 

29 Wife of William Henry, aged 31 
years and 6 months. 
Nov. 5 Anna Sheldon [widow of Capt. 
Isaac Sheldon, daughter of 
Rev. Jonathan and Margaret 
(Whiting) Marsh, born Jan. 28, 
1730], aged 73 years. 

11 Nathanail Bunce to digging a 
grave for Anna Pager of New 
York, aged 49 years 

13 Hezekiah W. Bissell [son of 
Hezekiah Bissell, Esq., of 
Windsor, Surgeon and Lieut, 
in the United States Army], 
aged 30 years. 
520 



Dec. 22 



28 



1803 

Jan. 19 



17 Wife of Benjamin Wood [Lucy 
daughter of John and Lydia 
(Wadsworth) Seymour, born 
Aug. 19, 1765, in West Hart- 
ford], aged 37 years. 

26 Sarah [Elizabeth] Kneeland 
[ Elizabeth, daughter of William 
and Elizabeth (Brace) Sedg- 
wick, bapt. in West Hartford, 
July 5, 1745, widow of Ebenezer 
Kneeland]. 
Daughter of John Shepard, aged 

22 years. 
John Lawrence [son of Capt. John 
and Marian (Beauchamp) Law- 
rence, born June 11, 1719, 
Treasurer of Connecticut], aged 
83 years and 6 months. 

Child of Edward Dolphin, aged 
3 months. 

Daughter of Jonathan Chapman 
[Anna Amelia], aged 3 years. 

Nathaniel Seymour [son of 
Charles and Elizabeth (Hum- 
phrey) Seymour, born in 1769], 
aged 34 years. 

The estate of Mrs. Martha (?) 
Cheney to toling the bell for 
her, aged 64 years. 

Willard Smith, aged 37 years. 

Child of Allen Goodwin, aged 8 
months. 

Child of Rachel Dix (?), aged 6 
years. 

Rachel Lord [widow of John 
Haynes Lord, daughter of 
Captain John and Rachel 
(Olcott) Knowles], aged 77 
years. 
Mar. 5 SarahLarkem, charged the Town, 
aged 97 years. 



Feb. 



26 



30 



30 
9 

16 

17 



BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 521 



Child of Samuel Marsh, aged 6 

years. 
Wife of Joseph Grist, aged 49 

years. 
Child of George Cole, aged 6 

months. 
Elihu Eglestone[son of Kbenezer 

and Mary (Lane) Eglestone, 

born in Middletown, Aug. 1, 

1742], aged 59 years. 
15 Theodore Hopkins [son of Capt. 

Thomas and Anna Hopkins, 

bapt. Dec. 10, 1749], aged 53 

years. 
Samuel Benton [son of Moses 

Benton], aged 52 years. 
Son of Abel Flint [ Royal Bissell ] , 

aged 1 and 3 months. 
8 Robert Center, aged 36 years. 
15 Wife of Isack Jones [Anne]. 
17 John Foot [drowned in Conn. 

River]. 

17 Joseph Watson [drowned in 

Conn. River], aged 30 years. 

21 William Boardman to digging a 
grave for Mrs. Catlin [Mary, 
widow of Ebenezer Catlin, and 
daughter of Deacon Joseph and 
Abigail (Hastings) Holtom, 
bapt. Sept. 15.. 1728], aged 75 
years. 

31 Miss Mary Allen, aged 78 years. 
1 Elisha Wadsworth [son of Icha- 
bod and Sarah (Smith) Wads- 
worth, born Sept. 21, 1721], 
aged 81 years. 

15 Anna Sandbye (?), aged 49 years. 

19 Robert Seymour (son of Capt. 
Daniel and Lydia (King) Sey- 
mour, born 1766], aged 47 
years. 

18 Child of Amasa Jones, aged 1 

year. 
23 Child of Frances Davis, aged 8 

days. 
25 John Jones, aged 55 years. 
29 George Burr [son of Thomas and 

Sarah (King) Burr, bapt. Dec. 

15, 1751], aged 51 years. 
Child of Daniel Hopkins, aged 9 

months. 
Jerusha Skinner, aged 82 years. 

19 Hezekiah Cadwell, Jr., charged 

the Town, aged 23 years. 



28 

29 

Aug. 26 

27 

27 

28 

29 
30 

3i 
3i 

Sept. 4 



23 
25 



Oct. 1 
9 

9 
11 

15 
18 



Wife of Eliakim Fish [Sarah, 
daughter of Capt. Nathaniel 
and Sarah (Allyn) Stillman of 
Wethersfield married (i)Capt. 
Samuel Lancelot, of Wethers- 
field, (2) Oct. 18, 1769, Dr. 
Eliakim Fish], aged 66 years. 

Daughter of Roderick Sheldon 
[Catherine Julia], aged 3 years. 

Child of Josiah Smith, aged 3 
days. 

Son of Geo. Steele [William], 
aged 1 year and 6 months. 

Son of Martha Brunson, aged 4 
years. 

Son of Oliver Boardman, aged 1 
year. 

Child of William Pairce (?) aged 

1 year. 

Wife of Abel Buel, aged 34 years. 
Richard Lord, charged Oliver D. 

Cook, aged 19 years. 
Son of Amasa Jones, aged 8 years. 
Daughter of Henry Salsbury, 

aged 1 year and 7 months. 
Child of Daniel Butler. 
Daughter of Hezekiah Bull, aged 

2 years. 

Mary Nichols [daughter of 

William and Mary (Farns- 

worth) Nichols, bapt. April 10, 

I743L aged 60 years. 
Daughter of Daniel Danforth, 

aged 4 years. 
Child of Isack Nelson, aged 9 

months. 
Remember (Reuben ?) Judd's 

wife was buried, aged 29 years. 
Timothy Church, aged 69 years. 
Wife of Joel Huntington, aged 20 

years. 
Elizabeth Allin, aged 70 years. 
Son of Joseph Winship [Tim- 
othy], aged 14 years. 
Son of Joseph Milard, aged 9 

years. 
Michael Olcott, to digging a 

grave for a child of Clarks, 

aged 1 year. 
Daughter of K. Wells, aged 8 

years. 
Wife of Joseph Winship[ Sarah], 

aged 60 years. 



522 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



Oct. 19 Son of Peter Morgan, aged 2 1804. 

years. Jan. 10 

19 Child of Alfred Janes [Albert], 

aged 1 year. 
22 Son and daughter of John I« 

Wells, both buried in one grave 10 

[Anne Aurelia], daughter aged 

4, [Seth Elsworth] son, a 2. 
25 Child of Thomas Lloyd, aged 3 

months. 
28 Daughter of Samuel Drigs, aged 

3 years. 
Nov. 7 William Lawrence to toling the 

the bell for the funeral of Mrs. 

Sarah Hail of Coventry [Sarah 

Adams, widow of Major John 

Hale, of Coventry], aged 50 

years. 
9 William Brown [son of Samuel 

and Hannah (Landon) Brown, 

born in Guilford, Nov. 30, 

1764], aged 39 years. 
James Wadsworth [son of Blisha 

and (Cad well) Wadsworth, 

bapt. June 28, 1752], aged 51 

years. 
Son of Captain Bacon. 
Wife of James [John]McCracken 

[Rebecca, daughter of Dr. 

Lemuel Hopkins], aged 21 

years. 
Samuel Thompson, aged 35 

years. 
Son of Nathaniel Winship 

[Henry], aged 1 year. 
Martha Shepard, aged 80 years. 
Wife of Moses Smith, Jr, 

[Thirza], aged 28 years. 
Dec. 2 Daughter of Benjamin Smith 

[Roxy], aged 2 years. 
3 Son of Noah Humfry [Horace], g 

aged 6 years. g 

6 Son of Joseph Butler, aged 1 

year. 
Wife of Henry Weeden. 
Son of Thomas Wells, aged 5 

years. 
Mary Sheldon [wife of John 

Sheldon, and daughter of Rev. 9 

John and Love (Sanfordj Gra- 19 

ham of Suffield], aged 84 years. 
Son of Thomas Wells, aged 1 27 

year. 



13 



26 



25 
26 



13 
18 

26 



28 



15 
19 
22 
Feb. 2 
15 

17 



19 
23 

27 

27 

March 3 

4 

5 



17 
April 8 

23 

29 

May 2 



Daniel Skinner [son of Daniel 

and Abigail (Smith) Skinner, 

bapt. Aug. 18, 1745], aged 58 
years. 
Son of Thomas Watts, aged 3 

years. 
Mary Clark, charged to Ithamar 

Coles, aged 3 years. 
Child of Benjamin Pratt, aged 1 

year. 
Child of Ethemy(Ithamar)Coles, 

aged 1 year. 
Daughter of John J. White, aged 

7 years. 
Son of Capt. James Bigelo, aged 

2 years. 
Child of Geo. Tinker. 
Wife of John J. White [Elizabeth 

Shelton, born April 4, 1776], 

aged 27 years. 
Child of Josephus Fitch. 
Wife of Henry Wadsworth [Betsy 

Bidwell], aged 38 years. 
Son of Jackson Brown. 
Samuel C. Day, aged 30 years. 
Charles Merels, aged 49 years. 
Son of Aseph Hall, aged 1 year. 
Son of Joseph Hanson. [Joseph 

Williams], aged 1 year. 
Dorothy Welles [widow], 

87 years. 
Child of Joseph Hanson. 
William Hooker, charged 

sider Burt, aged 55 years. 
Wife of Henry Hall, aged 24 years. 
John Lawrence, aged 31 years. 
[Col.] Jeremiah Wadsworth [son 

of Rev. Daniel and Abigail 

(Talcott) Wadsworth, born 

July 12, 1743], aged 61 years. 
Asa Rogers, aged 77 years. 
Dr. Eliakim Fish [son of 

Nathaniel and Mary (Pabodie) 

Fish, born in Stoniugton, Feb. 

2, 1740-41: Yale Coll., 1760: 

first President of the Hartford 

County Medical Society], aged 

63 years. 
Simon Clark, aged 37 years. 
Son of Samuel Marsh, aged 4 

years. 
Son of Josiah P. Burnham, aged 

1 year. 



aged 



Con- 



BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 523 



May 30 Daughter of Noah Humfry 
[Mary], aged 4 years. 

June 6 Daughter of Mary Day [daughter 
of Samuel Day, (So. Ch. rec.)], 
aged 3 years. 

7 Sarah Terry, aged 36 years. 
July 2 Son of Charloty Canfield [Geo. 

Newton, son of E. Canfield. 
(So. Ch. rec.)], aged 3 years. 
21 Daughter of Seth Sweetser, aged 
4 years. 
Aug. 6 Daughter of Reuben Wadsworth 
[Harriet], aged 9 years. 

8 Mary Barnard [widow], aged 54 

years. 
12 Mother of Henry Butler, aged 78 

years. 
14 Wife of Thomas Steele [Eunice], 

aged 59 years. 
24 Mary Cone, charged to Luther 

Savage, aged 15 years. 

26 Wife of John Lee, aged 44 years. 

27 Son of Benjamin Withenbury. 

aged 5 years. 
31 Son of Nathaniel Jones, aged 5 
months. 

John Howard, aged 34 years. 

Joseph Hanson, aged 33 years. 

Daughter of John Putnam, aged 
1 year. 

Son of Roger Barnes (?) 

Child of Mary Burbrig. 

Son of Thankful Basset. 

Susanah Cadwell, aged 77 years, 

Levi Kelsey, aged 49 years. 

Son of Benjamin Smith. 

John Jackson, charged to Oliver 
Terry. 

Child of Benjamin Smith. 

Wife of Enos Doolitel, aged 45 
years. 

Child of Daniel Love charged to 
the Town. 

Wife of Jeremiah Barrett, aged 
42 years. 

Timothy Goodwin [son of Natha- 
niel and Sarah (Easton) Good- 
win, bapt. Jan. 12, 1706-7,] 
aged 98 years. 
Dec. 7 Daughter of Titus L. Bissell. 
15 Child of Asa Allen [William], 

aged 8 months. 
15 Daniel Curtis, charged to the 
Town, aged 65 years. 



Sept. 7 


15 


22 


23 


28 


Oct. 3 


6 


11 


12 


14 


24 


29 


Nov. 22 


25 



20 

28 
31 

1805. 

Jan. 3 



Feb. 1 

7 



21 



24 



Mar. 15 



26 
April 2 

9 
17 



25 
May 19 

22 

29 



Daughter of John Lee, aged 9 

years. 
Child of Steven Tomson, aged 1 

year. 
Child of Peg Stoker, alias Flag. 
William Warner, charged to the 

Town, aged 57 years. 

Son of Samuel Holtom Webster, 
aged 11 weeks. 

Job Cook, charged to the Town, 
aged 43 years. 

Son of Roger Clap. 

The estate of Aaron Hosford for 
toling the bell, aged 33 years. 

William Thomas, charged to the 
Town, aged 70 years. 

Mary Ensign [widow], aged 78 
years. 

Wife of James Goodwin [Hannah, 
daughter of Nathaniel and 
Elizabeth (Allyn) Mather, born 
in Windsor, March 20, 1762], 
aged 43 years. 

Wife of Chancey Goodrich [Mary 
Ann, daughter of Gov. Oliver 
and Lorain (Collins) Wolcott, 
born in Litchfield, Feb. 16, 
1765; "One of the most famous 
beauties of her time"], aged 
40 years. 

Child of Jonathan Root. 

Child of William [illegible] 
charged to the Town. 

Francis Rockwell [son of Fran- 
cis Rockwell], aged 19 years. 

Moses Ensign, [son of Moses and 
Love (Andrews) Ensign, bapt. 
Dec. 24, 1732], charged to the 
Town, aged 72 years. 

Daniel Roberts [Oliver Roberts, 
(So. Ch. rec.)], aged 34 years. 

Alcis E. Hart [son of Maj. Jona- 
than and Abigail (Riley )Hart, 
born in Kensington, Oct. 10, 
1782], aged 22 years. 
Child of Edward Danforth. 

Child of Eliflet Smith, aged 2 

years. 
Mary Shepard [widow], aged 43 
years. 

WilliamGoodwin[son of William 
and Elizabeth (Collyer) Good- 
win, born Nov. 10, 1733], aged 
71 years. 



524 BURIALS IN CENTER CHURCH BURYING GROUND. 



May 30 Mary Tailor [daughter of James 
Taylor, Deed], aged 6 years. 

June 18 Wife of Thomas Bull [Ruth, 
daughter of Moses and Sarah 
(Howard) Butler, born April 
16, 1765], aged 40 years. 

July 11 John Peden, aged 33 years. 

21 Wife of William Olcot, aged 47 

years. 

22 Wife of John Ripley, aged 54 

years. 

23 George Pratt, aged 49 years. 
23 John Cook, aged 74 years. 

Aug. 3 Sarah Swetland [widow], aged 
82 years. 
5 Wife of John Steele [ Sarah ] ? 
aged 42 years. 

20 Elizabeth Webster [widow of 
Medad Webster, and daughter 
of Deacon Joseph and Abigail 
(Hastings) Holtom, bapt. June 
7, 1724], aged 82 years. 

20 Kbenezer Bogg, aged 30 years. 

26 Child of Jabish Perkins, Jr. 
30 Child of Ebenezer Spear. 

Sept. 3 Child of Rachel [illegible], aged 
2 years. 

5 Child of Ebenezer More. 

6 Son of Simon Pease, aged 13 

years. 

7 Cnild of Simon Pease. 

8 Nathaniel Blake, aged 42 years. 

11 Daughter of Simon Pease, aged 3 

years. 

14 Jonathan Ramsay [son of Hugh 
and Lydia (Craig) Ramsay, 
born in Londonderry, N. H., 
Sept. 9, 1757], aged 48 years. 

25 Fish, aged 24 years. 

25 John Wells [son of Thomas and 
Abigail Welles, bapt. Apr. 5, 
1730], aged 75 years. 

27 Son of Gideon Manly, aged 2 

years. 
30 Child of Hannah Smith, aged 9 
months. 
Oct. 4 Zacariah Peat, aged 78 years. 

8 John Chenevard [son of John 
Michael and Margaret (Beau- 
champ) Chenevard, born July 
2 9> I733L aged 7 2 years. 

8 Child of Joel Jones, aged 19 
months. 

12 Jeremiah Taber, aged 83 years. 



24 



27 



Nov. 2 



11 



Dec. 



26 



28 
29 

30 



11 



12 
16 



17 

17 

22 
24 

28 

30 



Child of Jonah Sloane, aged 1 

year. 
Margaret Goodwin [widow of 

William Goodwin and daughter 

of Capt. John Cook], aged 70 

years. 
Wife of William Dexter [Lur- 

ancy], aged 42 years. 
John Benton [son of Ebenezer 

Benton, bapt. Nov. 15, 1724], 

aged 81 years. 
Wife of Henry Hudson [Maria, 

daughter of Gov. Jonathan and 

Eunice (Backus) Trumbull, 

born Feb. 14, 1785, in Lebanon], 

aged 21 years. 
Isack Mason, aged 46 year. 
Wife of Charles Olcot [Mary, 

daughter of Thomas Stedman 

of Berlin,] aged 29 years. 
Daughter of Moses Sash, aged 20 

years. 
Daughter of William Davy, 

[Mary], aged 1 years. 
Asa Hopkins [son of Joseph and 

Hepsibah (Clark) Hopkins, 

born in Waterbury, Sept. 1, 

1757], aged 48 years. 
Caty Wadsworth [daughter of 

Eli Wad sworth], aged 21 years. 
Wife of Jonathan Hancock 

[Patty], aged 20 years. 
Child of Menzies Rayner, aged 

1 year. 
To toling the bell for Elias 

Morgan's wife [Sally daughter 

of Joseph Webb, of Wethers- 
field.] 
Mary Shepard, aged 72 years. 
Henry Sanford, charged to 

Dorcas Sanford [son of Isaac 

Sanford], aged 7 years. 
Mary Wheeler, charged to the 

Town of Hartford, aged 87 

years. 
Daughter of Elias Morgan, aged 

y/ 2 years. 
John Carter, aged 51 years. 
Child of James Perkins, aged 3 

months. 
Child of Nancy Humfry, aged 6 

months. 
Child of Titus Thomas, aged 2 

years. 



WHEN LAST I CLOSE MY EYES. 



525 



1806 








22 


Jan. 


17 
19 
23 


Wife of Miller Fish, aged 40 

years. 
Child of Samuel Allison, aged 10 

months. 
Child of William Wing. 




22 
30 




24 


Caleb Turner, aged 62 years. 


April 


3 


Feb. 


8 

25 
28 


Son of Isack Swetland. 
James A. Welles, aged 39 years. 
Joshua Hunt,charged to Richard 
Goodman, aged 67 years. 




26 


Mar. 


1 
19 


Horace Skinner, aged 29 years. 
Joseph Watson, aged 3 years. 







Mrs. Reffield [Redfield?], aged 
38 years. 

Steven charged to Samuel 

Kilbourn, aged 19 years. 

Daughter of James Perkins, aged 
6 years. 

Son of Jonathan Skinner, aged 1 
year. 

To toling the bell for Capt. James 
Pitkin, East Hartford, [his 
wife, RosannaM. Knox, daugh- 
ter of Capt. William and Jen- 
nett (Morrison) Knox, died 
April 23d.] 



WHEN LAST I CLOSE MY EYES. 



BY J. A. SPALDING. 



When last I close my eyes upon the light, 

To see no more the face of friend, or form 
Of aught the earth has held so fair and bright ; 

AVhen lone I grope in darkness for the warm 
And loving hand that's led me hitherto, 

To lead me in this drear and unknown way ; 
When vain I listen for the voice 1 knew, 

Some word of cheer or comfort now to say : 
When breath is gone, and only soul remains, 

Probation past, the future yet to know, — 
And with unmeasured toil my spirit gains 

The farther shore of Death's abysmal flow ; 
Great Comforter of helpless souls ! To Thee 

I look, in direst need and peril sore. 
Oh meet me now, and condescend to be 

My Helper, Friend and Saviour evermore ! 






SAMUEL JOHNSON JR., OF GUILFORD AND HIS 

DICTIONARIES. 



BY HENRY PYNCHON ROBINSON. 



AT the celebration of the two hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of Guilford, 
Connecticut, in 1889, among the literary 
curios displayed was a homely little book, 
oblong in shape and bound in leather. It 
was a school dictionary by the Rev. John 
Elliot and Samuel Johnson, Jr., of Guil- 
ford ; its printer, Edward Gray of Suffield ; 
its publishers, Oliver D. and Increase 
Cook of Hartford, where it was sold in 
1800. bound or in sheets for three and 
six pence. 

Samuel Johnson, Jr., was identified as 
sole author of a dictionary, published 
shortly previous (1798) and received with 
favor. This, set amply forth, at the dis- 
play of a thousand heirlooms of the town 
in 1889, it is fair to say did not transfix 
the attention of the ladies and gentlemen 
who, for two days beheld the sober little 
book and shied a glance at its story. 

In July, 1898, a letter appeared in a 
Guilford newspaper asking for information 
of Samuel Johnson, Jr., stating that his 
school dictionary, issued in 1798, was the 
first in America that only two copies were 
known, one in the British Museum and 
one, imperfect, in the library of Yale 
University. The replies which this drew 
forth contained little information concern- 
ing the dictionary. 

What can we say of a work so unknown, 
and what of its author, belonging to the 
generation of our great grandfathers? 
While all knowledge of the book has almost 
utterly passed away, not so of the author 
526 



himself, who is remembered to-day by a 
few patriarchs who recall from childhood 
a tall, spare, old gentleman with piercing 
eyes and rounded shoulders, who moved 
briskly between the home on Fair street 
and the fulling-mill on the upland meadow. 
The Johnson family, not without rivalry 
from the Elliots, has led our local names 
in literary and learned eminence since Dr. 
Samuel Johnson so fell in love with Moses 
and the children of Israel as to wish to in- 
troduce Hebrew here and did actually put 
out a little slip of a Hebrew grammar, one 
edition after another, 1767-71. He had 
become first president, in 1754, of King's 
College to be followed in 1787 by his 
eminent son, Dr. Samuel William Johnson, 
first president of Columbia College. He 
had gone abroad and got the " Great 
Bear" of English literature, Dr. Samuel 
Johnson, " who hated Americans " to love 
one American and to present him with a 
folio copy, elegantly bound, of his dic- 
tionary, third edition, 1765. The Ameri- 
can Johnson had a younger brother, 
Nathaniel, as had also the Englishman, 
who was first warden in 1744 of the Epis- 
copal Church in Guilford. Nathaniel 
married Mary Morgan, grand-daughter of 
Governor William Jones and great-grand- 
daughter of Theophilus Eaton of New 
Haven. Their son, Samuel married 
Margaret Collins,great-great-grand-daugh- 
ter of Governor William Leete of Guilford. 
Their son, Samuel Johnson, Jr., great 
nephew of the lover of the Hebrews is the 



SAMUEL JOHNSON, JR., OF GUILFORD. 



527 



one concerned in our inquiry. The family 
homestead was on Fair street, now owned 
by Edward Long, and there Samuel, Jr., 
was born, March 10, 1757. He married 
Huldah Hill of Guilford, May 24, 1780, 
and deceased June 20, 1836. Of children, 
three sons and one daughter, only one 
son, Samuel C, married and lived to ad- 
vanced age. The Johnson physiognomy 
and physique from one generation to 
another, have preserved the courtliness 
of their magisterial descent and it has 
been the peculiar property of the family to 
transmit eyes of rare and lustrous beauty. 

Aside from being teachers, the Johnsons 
were clothiers or fullers of cloth. Their 
establishment being the first in the state 
(1707). 

The farmers then generally kept sheep, 
and the frisking lamb had the place held 
by the saucy dog. They took the wool in 
bales and bundles to the Johnson mill to 
be carded and the cloth to be fulled. It 
was then colored in stylish blue with indi- 
go or in black with logwood, but most in 
butternut, and our yeomen wove stout 
homespun suits dn that good, working 
color. All proud old gentlemen wore the 
blue coat with blue buttons and a prouder 
coat never honored the back of a man. 

Teaching was hereditary for generations 
in these two collateral branches of the 
family, and possibly for the greater period 
from 1750 to 1 805-1810 Samuel Johnson, 
Sr., and Jr., taught in the academy on 
Guilford green. Men and women of that 
day have told of the old academy with its 
cob-webbed hall and two chimneys with 
open fire-places built out into the room, 
and the "corder" outside, where the 
wood was thrown between the posts and 
measured ; and the red cloak and fools- 
cap, hung in the wardrobe of punishment, 
kept to shame the village dunce. 

Reading, writing and arithmetic, the 
famous three Rs, were the useful trivium 



of common instruction, supplemented with 
grammar and geography, and lessons in 
reserve from the birch and mahogany 
rulers. 

There Master Johnson shone like a 
luminary of learning to the region around. 
He was a Federalist ; one day when the 
country seemed to be going over to 
France, that is to Infidelity and Revolu- 
tion, he set the urchins this copy, 
" Demons, Demagogues, Democrats, and 
Devils." If the line betrays the rash and 
fiery patriot, its shades of meaning show 
the lexicographer. To his favorite pupil, 
Fitz Greene Halleck, the poet, he gave a 
copy of Campbell's Pleasures of Hope ; 
upon another he bestowed an apple tree, 
not in the shape of twigs of correction, 
which now a mighty wreck, a century old, 
still bears fruit. The master was among 
the first in this region to propagate fruit 
trees, and grafted apples and pears for the 
farmers around. He was a student of 
genealogy, a skillful calligraphist and given 
to writing down choice English extracts 
from classic authors. Being rather spare 
of limb, one day a peddler accosted him 
and despite his protestations that he 
wanted nothing insisted like a good ped- 
dler upon selling something, until the 
master, in sheer desperation cried out : 
"Well have you a pair of tin boots?" 
" I have," said the peddler " and they will 
just suit you." Out went the man of tin 
and brought in a pair of candle-moulds 
saying " there, I guess those will fit you." 

But what could have set Master Johnson 
to making a dictionary? Let us now 
explore this past, where we once lost a 
dictionary and put ourselves in alignment 
with that heroic era of our history and 
show our learning. Let us recall contem- 
porary names and events, and so, slowly 
and respectfully, approach the meaning 
to us of such a phenomenon. However 
it may dishearten the present or dis- 



5 2l 



SAMUEL JOHNSON, JR., OF GUILFORD. 



courage the future generations, we must 
testify to the superior beings who appeared 
in Guilford after 1 780, sons and daughters 
of the Revolution who marked the culmi- 
nation of an era. To-day, to stimulate or 
flatter or shame us, our clergy phrase it to 
us under the euphemism, " there were 
giants in those days." 

It is new evidence of those giants, who 
developed into civil magnates and poets 
and wilful beauties whom we have seen 
passing off the stage, venerable and 
honored, that in their youth they stimula- 
ted Master Johnson to make a lexicon 
and were the real climate and soil in 
which it grew. 

Further, the position of Connecticut 
was then commanding. When James 
Hillhouse was in Congress, before and 
after 1800, forty-seven members, one-fifth 
of the whole number in both houses, were 
natives of this state. In 1798 Oliver 
Wolcott went out as governor and Jonathan 
Trumbull, son of "Brother Jonathan," 
came in. Timothy Dwight, called " Pope 
Dwight" because he never liked to be 
contradicted, became president of Yale 
College inT795. In 1797 Dr. Jedidiah 
Morse wrote : " A thirst for learning 
prevails among all ranks of people in the 
state." He had prepared two monster 
volumes of geography to quench it ; of 
which Dr. Noah Porter, Sr., writing in 
1864 of the days of 1799 in Yale College, 
says : " Our memories were severely 
tasked on Morse's two huge volumes of 
geography; we were required to recite 
the whole of them." 

1798 was fourteen harvests after the 
Revolution and affairs were expanding. 
Language itself expands, but not always 
genteelly. Noah Webster declared that 
u a vicious pronunciation prevailed ex- 
tensively among the common people of 
the country." 

Now mending the accent has been a 



favorite pastime of our Guilford school- 
masters. Remnants of such disorderly 
words as pompoddlers (strange visitors), 
pantopound (forest), Gillkicker, furzino 
(as far as I know), nip, sling, winkum, 
stun, portin ; with Scran, Grissel, Gutt- 
ridge for Scranton, Griswold, Goodrich, 
appearing about that day in our Guilford, 
show a dangerous disorder of palate and 
cartilaginous tongue. There was even a 
tendency among the young to wander 
from the native vernacular and take to fine 
foreign language. Miss Roxana Foote 
(the mother of the Beechers) became 
so infatuated with French as to tie it in 
books to her spinning wheel and study it 
while spinning out the flax. . But grand- 
mas mixed a little French with their 
dialect and when the children were noisy, 
Grandma B. would say : I should think 
those children were having a regular 
,f fudigy " (feu-de-joie) . 

The danger that Guilford would turn 
about and talk Hebrew, out of respect for 
the Jews, has once loomed up here when 
that earlier Samuel Johnson introduced 
his little Hebrew grammar, which he be- 
lieved to be the first and original language, 
taught by God to mankind. And it was 
much beloved by all old-fashioned and 
looking-backward people as the supposed 
parent of all tongues and mothers used 
Hebrew to call their children : and Aaron, 
Reuben, Ichabod, Zebulon, Abigail, Mehit- 
abel, all back to Noah's flood, handicap- 
ped the urchins and jarganized the house- 
holds. 

This penchant for the Hebrew in other 
quarters of New England is shown curi- 
ously by notes made by the Marquis De 
Chastellux, in his travels in North America 
in 1782, when, finding that some of the 
people proposed to abandon their own 
language he says ''Nay, from their dislike 
of everything English, they seriously pro- 
pose introducing a new language and 



SAMUEL JOHNSON, JR., OF GUILFORD. 



529 



some persons were desirous that the 
Hebrew should be substituted for the 
English. The proposal was that it should 
be taught in the schools and made use of 
in all public acts." 

But further, at that day some chose to 
talk like the Romans. In a decision on 
the question, "is the study of the learned 
languages beneficial ? " President Dwight 
said : ''When I was tutor and had occasion 
to introduce foreigners into the library, 
I could converse with them in Latin." 
Dr. Dwight again, in another decision of 
a dispute of the Senior class, given in 1S1 1 
upon the question of foreign immigration, 
the notes of which are before me, declares : 
"If you introduce foreigners, our language 
would be a mixture (sic) of Scotchmen, 
Irishmen, Frenchmen, Spanish, Portu- 
guese, Dutch, Danes, Swedes, Germans, 
Switz, etc. What would be the language 
of such a mixture ? ' ' 

Against these dangers and alarms Mas- 
ter Johnson fought, not with empty trum- 
pets like Joshua at Jericho but he silently 
resolved a sober little book that should 
mayhap show mothers how to call their 
children and give mongrel folks from 
Europe something to be guided by. It 
was a School Dictionary by Samuel John- 
son, Jr., of the most useful words, not at- 
tainable by common school books, printed 
and sold by Edward O'Brien in Xew 
Haven, without date but advertised Nov- 
ember, 1 79S, in the Connecticut Journal. 

The words in single columns are 
ushered in by remarks on the parts of 
speech and the duties they are expected 
to perform, and a page of errata closes 
the book in good Oxford style. It is a 
24 mo. of 19S pages and near 4300 words. 
Sally Stanton's copy now in the Yale Uni- 
versity Library, which came from the sale 
of George Brinley's library in 1SS6 is a 
literary curio with marks of pathos. Sally 
seems to have nibbled off in her hungry 



moods between meals some of the thin 
paper and paste from the rude chestnut 
covers. 

The preface asserts that : " The author, 
from long experience as Instructor, having 
found the want of a sizeable School Dic- 
tionary has been stimulated to compile 
and now offers to the public the following 
performance. It is not calculated or 
intended to afford either entertainment or 
instruction to persons of education." 
However, when the master brought out 
his book and introduced it to his reading 
and spelling townsmen, those who could 
not get instruction from it were bound to 
get entertainment, and I am pained to 
say and confess it as a fault that certain 
Guilford folk, not lovers of language, 
laughed at the new dictionary. 

Perhaps our first American lexicogra- 
pher thought he could aim higher than 
the sun : for tradition says, he strove 
to restore the chattering tongue to its 
more sonorous action, and to give the 
vowels their old fashion, as i long in active, 
native (as from nativus) before it was 
shortened by sluggish utterance which 
word — wardens like Savce. Earle and 
Skeats have discovered and denounced. 
He taught '•' nater " for nature and in- 
stilled simpleness and vigor instead of 
artfulness and sloth in speech. This very 
word, nature, was observed by his kins- 
man, Dr. Samuel William Johnson, while 
in England, to be uttered with u long 
until after 1770 when out of the theatre 
came the style of saying "nachur," and it 
became the fashion. 

The following are quaint treasures from 
the book, many of them found also in 
Bailey, Halliwell, and even Webster 
marked obsolete : 
belive, speedily, quickly. 
lout, to bow awkwardly, 
mome, a dull person, 
mizzy, shaking meadow. 






36 



530 



SAMUEL JOHNSON, JR., OF GUILFORD. 



mouth-honor, insincere civility, 
nustle, to fondle, to cherish, 
night-foundered, lost in the night, 
passing-bell, a bell rung when dying, 
russet, country dress, 
stingo, fine old beer, 
tongue-pad, a very great talker, 
yard-wand, measure of a yard. 

This literary awakening in Guilford is 
a transcript of what happened further 
abroad. At that day sharp comparisons 
were made between English use and 
American use of the common language. 
The critical notes of foreign visitors, 
traveling in our country to find things to 
dislike, were severe. Later Inchiquin's 
Letters and their review, attributed to 
Southey, stirred replies and were answered 
also by Dr. Dwight, who presents com- 
parative columns of words misused in 
England and in America. Then ap- 
peared Pickering's Vocabulary and pur- 
sued the subject in a scholarly manner 
from notes made in London, where from 
1799 to 1 80 1, Pickering watched the 
English in their speech. 

Of dictionaries then there were a plenty, 
and the Roxbury school had a special 
desk to hold one. Nine lexicons were 
advertised at once on sale at Albany 
before 1798, but not one was fit for school 
use or would go into a boy's pocket. 
English orthography had become settled 
in its present form about 1650, but with 
some it was never settled and here again 
in our very own home and dooryard, the 
hereditary spelling was odd and wayward, 
as appears in examples taken from 
Steiner's new history of Guilford and 
Madison: "gurls," "naibprs," "divell," 
"prophane," " knockt," "sawsy," " in- 
specshon," " colledge corne " that went 
up from poor Guilford to then poorer 
Harvard ; in the town decrees to secure a 
" Scowlmaster " and to give him " fiftene 
pound" for his encouragement; and that 



no u hors be tyed " to any part of the 
meeting house. 

Toward the close of the century what 
looks like a reading or spelling mania 
swept over the country and Webster's 
spelling books, with the immortal boy in 
the apple tree and the romantic milk- 
maid, began to fall like leaves in autumn 
upon the land. Indeed spelling that 
demands incredible cunning and presence 
of mind, became so great a fashion and 
disorder that it took the place of plays 
and sports, as we have seen it break out 
like a frolic in our own day ; so that it 
stirred the envy of lovers of rival learning 
and so late as 1825 we find it charged 
"that the spelling book is the greatest 
barrier to intellectual improvement." 

Noah Webster, born in 1758, had been 
busy since 1783, writing as a publicist 
and the most practical litterateur of the 
day. He took hold with vigor to straight- 
en out the native tongue, arrest phonetic 
decay and restore letters to their natural 
rights of accent and order. He cautioned 
such as were about to say "ax" for ask, 
" chimbley" for chimney, "cornich" for 
cornice and devised reforms, even greater 
then could be carried out. Webster had 
long been plotting great designs for edu- 
cation with his three volumes of Grammat- 
ical Institutes, Speller, Grammar and 
Reader. Such a man must have been too 
busy or too lofty to give a friendly nod to 
Samuel Johnson, Jr., and his dictionary. 

But let me not affect so great ignorance 
and injustice here : for Webster, who had 
come early in 1798 to live in New Haven, 
indeed did notice and warrant the school 
dictionary, issued by Elliot and Johnson 
in 1800. Our Johnson's first lexicon, de- 
clared to be tentative and introductory to 
a future improved edition, had gone off 
so like hot cakes on a wintry morning, 
and it has been so faithfully used and 
abused that only two copies have come 



SAMUEL JOHNSON, JR., OF GUILFORD. 



53* 



down to us. The author now set about a 
new and larger work, this time with more 
skill and company. 

In East Guilford lived parson John 
Elliot, grandson of the reverend, quaint 
Jared, who catching Plebrew from Dr. 
Johnson yet remotely loved to read and 
mumble it daily to himself, and so became 
a great monger of words. These two 
polyglots then like suns in conjunction 
revolving and conniving together, brought 
out in 1800 the school dictionary already 
quoted. In Worcester's list of lexicons, 
this stands as the first American diction- 
ary. He seems not to have known the 
earlier book, which that great hunter of 
books, George Brinley of Hartford, dis- 
covered. 

The first issue, of two hundred and 
twenty-three pages, has near nine thousand 
words. Later copies, issued the same 
year, making a so called second edition 
have twenty pages less of prefatory matter. 
The preface is dated Guilford, Jan. 1 
1800. The brave little book, an oblong 16 
mo. declares itself to be " for all America. 
A selected pronouncing and accented 
dictionary : comprising the choicest words, 
found in the best English authors : to- 
gether with the addition of a number of 
words, now in vogue, not found in any 
dictionary." 

Hon. Hezekiah S. Sheldon, of Suffield, 
has the two editions of 1800 and recollects 
using the book in his school days. The 
Yale, the Lenox, and the New York 
Historical Society libraries have copies. 

I have striven with scant present 



knowledge to make amends for past 
ignorance and to restore the well nigh 
forgotten memory of a master, whom I 
have heard mentioned with respect by his 
pupils, and who himself nobly declared 
" that his ruling passion was to be ser- 
viceable to youth." At this late day, we 
will offer no faint patronizing praise to 
such a man. He belongs to the class of 
masters like Ezekiel Cheever, who also 
made his own text-books and cultivated 
an orchard and " when he stroked his 
long beard to a point it was a sign to the 
boys to stand clear : " who taught Cotton 
Mather and was buried from his own 
school-house, the dignitaries of the Massa- 
chusetts Colony attending, and who at 
the age of ninety-four " dyed a candidate 
for the first resurrection." 

Without exaggerating the merit of the 
special work Master Johnson performed, 
it was fundamental and unique, far more 
significant then than it could be now. The 
language had few watchmen and warders. 
That it was not abandoned by maddened 
patriots, nor degraded by local looseness, 
nor mongrelized by mixed European influ- 
ences already enumerated, has been due 
in a measure to the sagacity and vigilance 
of such men as Webster, Pickering, Elliot 
and Johnson, who defended it and beat 
back the Hebrew and fought its other 
enemies with spelling-book and lexicon. 

So Samuel Johnson, Jr., accomplished 
that triad of achievements, which Sterne 
has declared warrants a man in living ; he 
planted trees and wrote a book and handed 
down his name to posterity. 




EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF DR. MASON 
FITCH COGSWELL. 



COMPILED FROM ANNOTATIONS OF REV. DR. LEONARD BACON 



BY ELLEN STRONG BARTLKTT. 



PART I. 



IT is to that inexplicable magic of events 
that sometimes baffles us, that the fol- 
lowing precious and interesting manu- 
script owes its restoration to the land of 
its origin. 

Written in 1787, by the Dr. Cogswell, 
who afterwards achieved such a position 
in Hartford, and was, through his daughter 
so intimately connected with the estab- 
lishment of instruction for the Deaf and 
Dumb, it gives the pleasant incidents of 
a horseback journey among those noble 
old Connecticut families, whose names 
are still cherished among us. These way- 
side notes were evidently written for the 
pleasure of personal recollection and with 
no thought of the public or the future. 

Oblivion has fallen on their travels and 
their hiding-places for the following 
seventy years ; but no mystery of the 
concealment ot those yellow pages could 
be more remarkable than the place and 
circumstances of their discovery and res- 
toration, for they were found among 
absolute strangers in a southern state, and 
were returned to the very family connec- 
tion therein described. It was thus : 

Of the three sons of the Rev. Dr. 

Leonard Bacon, who were in our army 

during the Civil War, two were at the 

siege and capture of Richmond. One of 

532 



them was afterwards instrumental in 
returning to a southerner a certain record 
book which was desired. In the course 
of the acknowledgments of the courtesy, in 
the shape of newspapers, historical pam- 
phlets, etc. sent to Dr. Bacon there 
appeared a soiled and torn manuscript, 
which it was suggested might be of " local 
interest to Connecticut people !" But 
the strangest part of the story is that the 
diary was found among the papers of an 
old Presbyterian divine, the Rev. John D. 
Blair, who preached with acceptance for 
years in Richmond. A singular arrange- 
ment existed, whereby he and an Epis- 
copal minister used the same hall of the 
House of Delegates, for religious services 
on alternate Sundays. 

He was born in Pennsylvania, of Scotch- 
Irish parentage, and was educated in 
Pennsylvania, acquiring " doubtless " an 
orthodox prejudice against New England 
Divinity and an old-time Pennsylvanian 
dislike of Yankees generally. To quote 
Dr. Bacon, " It was among the papers of 
this Scotch-Irish Presbyterian minister, 
born and educated in Western Pennsyl- 
vania and domiciled for more than thirty 
years or more in Virginia, that our manu- 
script was found. How it came there is 
a mystery, for Mr. Blair is in no way 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



533 



related to Connecticut or to New England. 
How it happened to remain there — why 
it was not taken for waste paper — why it 
did not go as a minister's old sermons 
ordinarily go after his decease is another 
mystery. 

" The first leaf (if no more) is missing \ 
and at the top of what I suppose to have 
been the third page, we find the diarist 
recording that he ' went to bed and slept 
luxuriously after supping plenteously on 
sweetmeats and cream pompion pie and 
br.dal kisses.' Evidently he had been at 
a wedding. Then comes a date. "Friday. 
14th,' with no mention of the month or 
year, but with the record, ' slept late in 
ihe morning on account of the wedding, 
made several morning calls — wished the 
bride more joy — got my horse shod and 
set out for Xorwalk, where I made a 
cousinly visit and ate, drank and slept 
for nothing. In the evening called 

on Miss C n, who treated me with 

friendly attention, unaffected smiles and 
sprightly wine — the last she gave with a 
good will'." 

The next day ('"Saturday, 15th") we 
find him setting out early in the morning. 
•'Rode to Greenfield," he says, ,; and break- 
fasted with Mr. Dwight." This was the 
Rev. Timothy Dwight of Greenfield, 
Conn., who was a grandson of Jonathan 
Edwards and who was from 1795 to 1S17 
the light and the pride of New Haven. 

The diary goes on: "Staid much 
longer than I intended to. I however 
forgave myself very readily when I con- 
sidered the cause of the detention." Dr. 
Bacon explains that " the pastor of Green- 
field Hill was like Coleridge's Ancient 
Mariner in the power of fascinating even 
a wedding guest and holding him fast." 
Our wedding guest (for so we may call 
him) escaped in time to dine at Stratford 
where he seems to have had friends, but 
found nobody at home ; and thence he 



pushed on to New Haven. He makes 
no mention of the ferry across the Housa- 
tonic, but evidently the day was far spent 
before he was on the Milford side of the 
river. "The last part of the ride," he 
says, " was solitary, as it was in the even- 
ing, but it was better calculated for 
reflection. I was drawing nigh to the 
seat of my former pleasures, the recollec- 
tion of a thousand happy circumstances 
crowded round my heart and awakened 
some of its choicest emotions. In this 
way was the gloom of the evening for- 
gotten, and the tediousness of ten long 
miles entirely lost." In this sentimental 
mood he arrives at New Haven, an hour 
perhaps after the Saturday sunset. " Un- 
willing to sit down and spend the 
remainder of the evening with strangers, 
gro^-bruisers. etc.." he says, "I immedi- 
ately went in pursuit of my old friend 
Leander, but he was, unfortunately for 
me, out of town on a tour of duty. Not 
satisfied with a single attempt. I repaired 

to Mr H s. and the very friendly 

reception I met with from everyone 
secured me as a guest. My portmanteau 
was sent for and I was made as happy as 
I wished to be. After answering all 
the questions that were asked me in as 
satisfactory a manner as I could, I retired 
to my couch and slept in peace." 

Dr. Bacon fails to find a clue for 
" Leander," but he feels sure that Mr. 

H was "Captain" James Hillhouse, 

then living at the head of Temple Street. 
Though still a young man, he was already 
eminent among his fellow citizens, and 
his house was always a center of hospitality. 
It was there, we may believe, that our 
traveler was sleeping that Saturday night. 

His next day"s record begins thus : 
" Sunday 30th. Attended Divine service 
in the forenoon at the Brick, and heard a 
solid discourse from Dr. Dana; in the 
afternoon, my old place of worship, the 



534 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



Chapel, was honored with my presence, 
where I was highly entertained with a ser- 
mon from Dr. Edwards, from these words : 
' In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt 
surely die.' The discourse was accom- 
panied with good music." Thus far the 
diary has given us no mention of the 
month in which it was written, but looking 
forward for dates, we find that " Sunday, 
30th " is followed by " Monday, Dec. 1st." 
Dr. Bacon took the trouble to examine 
the diary of President Stiles in the College 
Library, and was rewarded by finding 
therein that on Nov. 16, 1788, Mr. 
Morse, who had been called to the church 
in Charlestown, Mass., preached in the 
forenoon in the College Chapel, and that 
in the afternoon Dr. Edwards, pastor of 
the White Haven Church in the Blue 
Meeting-house exchanging pulpits with 
Dr. Wales, Professor of Divinity in Yale 
College, preached in the afternoon from 
Gen. II, 17, 'In the day that thou eatest 
thereof thou shalt surely die.' If a ser- 
mon from Jonathan Edwards could be 
familiarly described as "highly entertain- 
ing," what must have been the " solid 
discourse " of Dr. Dana? 

So the question of month and year is 
settled and a search in the town records 
of Stamford shows that on the thirteenth 
of November, 1788, David Holley and 
Martha Coggeshall were married by Col. 
Abraham Davenport ; and thus the 
imagination may supply the missing begin- 
ning of the diary. Dr. Bacon goes on 
with the account : " Our traveler spent 
the evening at Dr. Stiles'," whose house 
(his official residence) was on the spot 
now covered by the College Street Church. 
He had a pleasant time that Sunday even- 
ing. His record is, ' The ladies are the 
same as when I was last at New Haven, 
Amelia somewhat indisposed and con- 
sequently deprived of a part of her 
volubility. She was quite as agreeable, 



however as she used to be. The circum- 
stance of meeting Messrs. Fitch and 
Morse added considerably to the pleasures 
of the evening.' " 

This " Mr. Morse " was no other than 
the •' Father of American Geography," 
Jedidiah Morse, the father also of the 
inventor of the telegraph and " Mr. Fitch" 
was then one of the college tutors, and 
was afterwards the first president of 
Williams College. 

Dr. Bacon goes on : " We are becom- 
ing acquainted with the writer cf this 
dingy manuscript, though as yet we have 
no indication of what his name was. He 
employed himself the next day, Monday, 
17 th, in visiting old friends, feeling 
happy himself and endeavoring to make 
others so." Evidently there was sunshine 
in his face all day ; and his diary tells us 
how the day ended. ' In the evening 
joined a party of about twenty couples at 
Mr. Mix's and danced till about twelve.' 
At Mr. Mix's, where was that? The 
house remains to this day ra good condi- 
tion, though of course not without some 
changes internal and external. Through 
a series of years it was my own ' hired 
house ; ' and to this day I never pass by it 
without a tender remembrance of those 
busy, anxious and happy years." 

"It is on Elm Street, next below the 
first Methodist Church. Devout old 
ladies venerable as the ' elect lady ' to 
whom — as the Apostle John addressed 
one of his Epistles — have told me how 
they, in the ' auld lang syne ' have danced 
in the ballroom there, which was at the 
eastern side of the house, on the second 
floor, and which in my day had been 
divided into two apartments. But where 
are the ' twenty couple ' who met there ? 

" 'To chase the flying hours with glow- 
ing feet,' Nov. 17, 1788. They seem to 
have had a lively time. Our genial friend 
records his own enjoyment of the evening : 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



535 



'I was never in a room before with so 
many good dancers, not an indifferent 



dancer in the room. 
B w, and E — 



Miss S s, B s, 

s were alternately 
honored with my hand. I did my best to 
persuade them that I was a good partner. 
I retired to my couch with comfortable 
reflections and a good appetite for sleep.' 
" Can we make out the four names which 
are indicated by initial and final letters? 

Miss 3 s is evidently Miss Stiles, a 

daughter of the president. Miss B s 



is probably Miss Beers, but I cannot iden- 
tify her. Miss B w was perhaps a 



Miss E- 



■s is Miss Edwards. 



I knew her when her dancing days were 
over, and when the beauty of 3 outh had 
become the dignity of an honored matron. 
She was Mrs. Johnson of Stratford, the 
elder sister of the late venerable Mrs. 
Whitney. Herself a grand -daughter of 
the world-famous theologian, Jonathan 
Edwards, who died president of a Presby- 
terian college at Princeton, her husband 
was a grandson of Samuel Johnson, the 
founder of the Episcopal Church in Con- 
necticut, and president of King's, (now 
Columbia) College in New York. Her- 
self the daughter of the brilliant laywer, 
Pierpont Edwards, her husband was the 
son of a more illustrious laywer, William 
Samuel Johnson. 

"The next day, 'Tuesday, 18th,' our 
traveler records that he ' breakfasted with 
Samuel Broome, was treated with hospi- 
tality by the whole family, and set out to 
Hartford with him.' The Triennial 
Catalogue of Yale College shows that 
Samuel Piatt Broome graduated A. B. in 
the class of 1786 : that he was admitted 
to the same degree in the college at 
Princeton the same year, and that he died 
in 181 1. At the date then, of the journal 
before us, he was a graduate of two years 
standing; and we may be sure that there 
was not in New Haven a young man 



whose prospects in relation to wealth were 
so brilliant as his. For a considerable 
period, the firm of Broome & Piatt was 
more conspicuous in the commerce of 
New Haven than any other. The two 
partners lived near each other in what we 
call East Water Street, where one of their 
dwellings remains to this day, and in 
those two houses there was probably 
more of the luxury and display of wealth, 
more of ' dash ' and ' fashion ' than 
anywhere else this side of New York. 
There was between the two families some 
alliance by marriage, and Mrs. Piatt, 
whether daughter or sister of Mr. Broome, 
was celebrated for her beauty. She was 
said to be the most beautiful woman in 
America ; and if that was so she was cer- 
tainly the most beautiful in the world. 

•'• Both families have passed away from 
New Haven, and their memory is passing 
away. The last survivor there was a 
grand-daughter of Mr. Piatt who died in 
i860. She had lived for years in a very 
humble dwelling at the corner of Crown 
and Temple Streets, and as her old age 
had been sustained and cheered by the 
christian brotherly kindness of the church 
in which she was a member, she be- 
queathed to that church for its poor 
members the little remnant of her worldly 
goods — the last of the wealth of the 
great house of Broome and Piatt. 

" Samuel Piatt Broome, no doubt, 
figured at the dancing party of Monday 
evening, November 17, 1788; and there 
(we may suppose) having learned that 
our traveler was going to Hartford the 
next day, he offered to go with him, and 
invited him to breakfast. 

"Accordingly, our friend, for so we may 
call him, having packed his portmanteau 
and thrown it over his saddle, takes leave 
of Mr. Hillhouse's hospitable family, 
rides to Mr. Broome's mansion, enjoys a 
sumptuous breakfast, and the two fellow- 



53^ 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



travelers, instead of taking seats (as we 
do) in a railway carriage, mount their 
horses and set out for Hartford. The 
road in those days ( for neither the 
'Hartford turnpike,' through Meriden, 
nor the ' Middletown turnpike ' through 
Northford, had come into existence) was 
by Cedar Hill to North Haven and thence 
to Wallingford, where they halted for the 
night. The next day they breakfasted at 
Durham, dined at Middletown, and about 
sunset arrived at Hartford. 

" There, if I may continue to mix up 
my personal recollections with my com- 
mentary on the journal, they were on 
ground with which I began to be familiar 
about twenty-four years later, and there 
was my wife's birthplace. We were 
therefore curious to know just where our 
friend would go in Hartford. The next 
words of the diary told us." 

"As soon as our horses were attended 
to we repaired to Col. Wadsworth's, 
Broome with his compliments, and I with 
my letters." 

" ' Col. Wadsworth's ! ' We knew very 
well where that was, for my wife's mother, 
then a young lady of fifteen years, was 
Col. Wadsworth's youngest daughter, and 
to my wife herself in her childhood that 
house was as familiar as our own house is 
today. 

" Col. Wadsworth's house was on the 
spot where the Wadsworth Athenaeum now 
stands. It was the house in which he 
was born, and in which his father had 
lived and died — the Rev. Daniel Wads- 
worth who was pastor of the first church 
in Hartford, from 1732 to 1747. In his 
boyhood, he was apprenticed by his 
widowed mother, to Matthew Talcott, of 
Middletown, who was her brother, and 
to whom she felt that she could safely 
entrust the bringing up of her only son to 
the business of a merchant. Young 
Jeremiah Wadsworth learned that busi- 



ness well. He became a prosperous 
merchant in Middletown, trading largely 
with the West India Islands. Living 
with his uncle, whose wife was a daughter 
of Rev. William Russell and a grand- 
daughter of Rev. James Pierpont, he 
married the younger sister of Mrs. Tal- 
cott, Mehitable, (otherwise called Mabel 
Russell) and Middletown continued to 
be his home till after the beginning of the 
war for Independence. In 1 7 7 7, he remov- 
ed his family to the old homestead, and in 
that house in which his children were born 
his children were brought up. 

" By reason of his extraordinary ability 
as a business man, he became Commissary- 
General of the Continental Army, and 
afterwards Commissary- General, in effect, 
of the French auxiliary army. In the 
last mentioned employment he con- 
tinued till the end of the war ; and 
thus instead of being beggared, as so 
many Revolutionary officers were by 
the bankruptcy of the Continental 
treasury, he found himself wealthy, per- 
haps the wealthiest man in Connecticut, 
for as having been the purchaser of 
supplies he had accounts to settle with a 
goverment that could pay. 

" The relation of Colonel Wadsworth to 
those armies made his house on one 
occasion the scene of a memorable inter- 
view. In the summer of 1780, Washing- 
ton, whose headquarters were on the 
Hudson, proposed to the Count de 
Rochambeau, then at Newport in com- 
mand of the recently arrived French 
army, an attack on New York. Letters 
were sent to the French Admiral in the 
West Indies with a request for naval • 
assistance from that quarter. 

" Meanwhile a conference between 
Washington and the commanders of the 
welcome but as yet useless French fleet 
and army was necessary. Just then it was 
that Benedict Arnold, who had been en- 



INDIAN PIPE. 



537 



trusted with the command of the fortress 
at West Point, attempted to consummate 
his crime. On Thursday, the fourteenth 
of September, 1780, Washington wrote 
from his headquarters to Arnold at West 
Point, ' I shall be at Peekskill on Sunday 
evening, on my way to Hartford to meet 
the French Admiral and General. You 
will be pleased to send down a gaurd of a 
captain and fifty men at that time and 
direct the quartermaster to have a night's 
forage for about forty horses. You will 
keep this to yourself as I wish to make 
my journey a secret.' Arnold was already 
in correspondence with Sir Henry Clinton 
at New York and he saw that the time 
had come to attempt the execution of his 
design. Washington began his journey 
on Monday, Sept. 18, and in his company 
were LaFayette, Knox and Hamilton. 
They could hardly have arrived at Hart- 
ford before Wednesday, September 20. 
On their arrival in Hartford, they were 
received with military honors, the Gover- 
nor's Guards and a company of artillery 
being on duty. Governor Trumbull, Col. 
Wadsworth and other distinguished men 
met the great commander-in-chief and 
conducted him to the house of Col. Wads- 
worth. The French General, Count de 
Rochambeau and the French Admiral, 
the Chevalier de Ternay with their suite, 
arrived soon afterwards and were received 
with appropriate honors at their landing, 
and then the consultation was held at the 
house of Col. Wadsworth and from that 



house, after a day of anxious conference, 
Washington set out on his return to the 
Highlands, where during his brief absence, 
Arnold's great treason had been exposed 
and baffled. 

"This was only eight years and two 
months before the evening in which 
Samuel Broome and our friend, who is as 
yet nameless, called at the same door, the 
one with his compliments, the other with 
his letters of introduction. 

" ' We,' says our friend, ' were rather in 
our dishabilles, but 'twas no matter, we 
were travelers, and they were none of 
them in the habit of regarding a powdered 
head and a pretty coat as the standard of 
excellency — their tastes are formed upon 
better principles. After delivering our 
compliments and letters, we wefe about 
leaving them, but were prevented by their 
importunities to stay and spend the even- 
ing. We needed but little coaxing, we 
laid aside our hats and our whips and 
resolved to stay as long as they wanted 
us. The beautiful Miss H 11s, (Hop- 
kins) the handsome Miss S r, (Sey- 
mour), and thepretty Miss B 11, (Bull), 

were of our party. Music, dancing and 
sociality constituted our amusements. 

Miss B 11 sang * The Hermit ' sweetly. 

I wished to accompany her with a flute, 
but I dared not tell them so. The bell 
rung much earlier than I wished and I 
left them when I would willingly have 
staid longer.' " 

( To be Continued. ) 



INDIAN PIPE. 



ELIZABETH ALDEN CURTIS. 



Strange, waxen flower, thy down-bended 
blooms, — 

Half hid 'neath fragrant droppings from 
you pine 

Up-reared so gaunt and barren, — in de- 
cline 

Of vulgar notice haunt the forest glooms ; 

And here, close clustered, guard their 
faint perfumes, 

Through the long summer, where the slant 
suns shine. 



It was not skill, but happy chance, made 

mine 
To catch the glister of thy crisp-curled 

plumes ! 
What place, mysterious flower, dost thou 

hold 
In this strange-fashioned earth's economy ? 
For-time, men plucked thee as a remedy 
'Gainst lesser hurts of body manifold, — 
Truly of mind as well, be-seemeth me. 
Being over beautiful and nothing bold ! 




BEB»ILMA 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self -addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department. Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



ANSWERS. 

67. (a). — The widow of Isaac Royce 
was Elizabeth, dau. of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Scudder) Lothrop. (Old 
Houses of Norwich, page 505), but she 
was not the Elizabeth " Roys " who m. 
Ebenezer Clark, Dec. 22, 1696. She 
m. 2nd Joseph Thompson and died 
before June n, 1690. (New Haven 
County Court Records, Vol. I, p. 178.) 
The wife of Ebenezer Clark was Eliza- 
beth, widow of Joseph Royce, son of 
Samuel, (New Haven County Court 
Records, Vol. I, pp. 234 and 256). 
She was the dau. of John and Hannah 
(Bassett) Parker. (Davis' History, 
Wallingford.) Ebenezer Clark died 
April 30, 1 72 1 and his widow Elizabeth 
m. 3 Nathaniel Andrews, Oct. 6, 1721, 
(Wallingford Town Records and Vol. 
V New Haven Probate Records.) (s) 
James Steele m. " Bethyah " Bishop, 
Oct. 18, 1 65 1. (Guilford Town Rec- 
ords, Dr. Alvin Talcott's ms. genealogy 
of Guilford Families and Savage's Gen- 
eral Dictionary under " Bishop.") She 
was the dau. of John and Anne Bishop 
of Guilford as shown by Talcott and 
Savage above cited and by the will of 
538 



Anne Bishop, widow of John as 
recorded in the Hartford Probate 
Records. She was one of the original 
members of the Second Church at 
Hartford and her name appears on 
Mrs. Smith's memorial to the original 
sisters of that church. Frank Barnard 
King of Albany, N. Y., is now preparing 
a revised edition of the Steele family. 
James Srepard, 

New Britain, Conn. 

97. — Mary, wife of Lieut. Miles Meiwin 
was dau. of Hezekiah Talcott, and 
Jemima, his wife. Mary was born in 
Durham, Feb. 16, 1723; d. Jan. 18, 
1793 Hezekiah Talcott moved from 
Hartford to Durham. He died in Dur- 
ham, Feb. 13, 1764, in his 70th year. 
Jemima d. Feb. 2, 1757 in her 66th 
year. A. M. Camp. 

83. — Mrs. Henry Walters of New Britain 
or Waterbury, Conn., has data concern- 
ing the Gladding family. 

86. (b). — Eber Merriman married (2) 
Hannah Rogers. Eber was son of 
Rev. John and Jemima (Wilcox) 
Merriman. Rev. John was son of John 
and Elizabeth (Peck). John was son 
of Nathaniel and Hannah (Lines). 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



539 



Nathaniel, born in England, was an 
early settler of New Haven. Hannah 
Rogers was from New London or 
Waterford. See Southington History, 
Genealogies, p. 168. 
67 • (P)- — Mary Hopkins, who married 
Capt. William Lewis, is said in the 
History of Wolcott to be the daughter 
of William Hopkins of Stratford, Conn. 

A. M. T. 

QUERIES. 

103. Aye?\ — William, was born Oct. 3, 
1 753, at Haverhill, Mass. He was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War for 
two years and three months ; was with 
Washington the memorable winter at 
Valley Forge and at one time was one 
of his body guard. He died at New- 
bury, N. H., June 5, 1827 ; was buried 
at Bradford Center. Who were his 
parents and brothers and sisters ? 

E. A. R. 

104. Joh?ison. — Wanted ancestry and 
birthplace of Robert Graham Johnson 
who was born in 1779, married (1) 
Hannah Bradley; (2) Wealthy Hum- 
iston, and died in Terryville, Conn., in 
1 86 1. His brother, Atwater Johnson, 
lived in New Haven and another 
brother, Samuel, lived in Bethlehem, 
Conn. F. R. S. 

105. (a) . — Wakeman.-- When and where 
did David Wakeman and his wife, 
Mary Jennings die? They removed 
from Fairfield about 1758 to New 
Fairfield, Conn., where they lived 
many years and where most of their 
children were born. He died about 
1 81 2-13, and it is tradition that he, 
and probably his wife also, in their old 
age went to live with some of their 
married children and there died. 
Their children lived in New Fairfield, 
Danbury, Easton, Conn, and Ridgefield, 

{/}). — Want date of the marriage of Jere- 
miah Wakeman, son of the above to 



Phebe Hendrick, daughter of John 
Hendrick, a Revolutionary soldier. 
Jeremiah and Phebe were born in Fair- 
field, Conn., but went to New Fairfield 
when children with their parents and 
probably married there about 1780-85. 
(c). — Would like the dates of their 
childrens' birth, also of David and 
Mary Wakeman's children. 
{d). — When was Eunice, eldest child 
of Jeremiah and Phebe Wakeman 
married to Aardn Piatt of Weston, 
Conn ? When did she die and where, 
and what was her age at death? Their 
other children were Martha and Mary. 
I want particularly the date of Martha's 
birth, (about 1793-5) and of her mar- 
riage (1810-n) to Hezekiah Wellman, 
(sometimes called Wildman) and date 
of her death. 

(e) . — Root— Want name of the wife of 
Thomas Root of Hartford and North- 
ampton, with date of marriage and 
date of wife's death. Would like list 
of his children, with dates of birth, 
especially the sixth child, Hezekiah. 
(/). — Tilton. — Want the family name 
of Elizabeth, wife of the Hon. Peter 
Tilton of Windsor, Conn., and Hadley, 
Mass., and correct date of their mar- 
riage. Want the correct date of their 
daughter Mary's birth and of her mar- 
riage to Joseph Eastman of Hadley, 
Mass., son of the emigrant, Roger 
Eastman. 

(g). — Williams. — Who was the Mr. 
Williams spoken of in Barber's " Conn. 
Historical Collection," page 11, in a 
list of names of men who served as 
committees from the three towns of 
Hartford, Windsor and Wethersfield 
at the beginning of the Pequot War ? 
He was father of the Mary Williams 
who married in 1647 Joshua Jennings, 
son of John Jennings of Hartford. 

C. L.S. 



540 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



106. — Merrill. — John married Esther 
Strickland April 14, 1731. Their chil- 
dren were Elizabeth, Gad, Asher, John. 
Who were the parents of the elder John ? 
Asahel Merrill, b. Feb. 2, 1764, married 
Abigail Judd, settled first in Danbury or 
Bethel and named one of his sons 
Bethel. Who were his parents? 

J. W. M. 

107. — (a). — Hall. — John, Jr., b. in Eng- 
land, 1619, died at Middletown, Conn., 
Jan. 22, 1694 ; was town clerk and re- 
corder 665-1694. Who was his wife? 
(b). — Plum. — Benoni, b. 1670, died at 
Middletown, Conn., Oct. 6, 1754. He 
married (1) the daughter of Daniel 
Hubbard of Middletown; (2) Dority 



Coall in Middletown, Nov. 1709; (3) 
in Middletown Jan. 8, 17 15, Abigal 
Gilbert of New Haven. Who were the 
parents of Benoni and Dority ? 
(<f). — Hubbard. — Joseph of Hartford 
and Middletown ; married Dec. 29, 
1670 in Middletown Mary Porter, who 
died there June 10, 1707. Who was 
she? W. P. Bacon, 

New Britain, Conn. 
108. — Yemans. — Who were the parents 
of Prudence Yemans (or Yeamans) 
born in Tolland, Conn., March 29, 
1772. She had a brother Julius, also a 
sister Abigail. She was married at 
Norwich, Vermont, Feb. 27, 1794, to 
Simeon Dewey. W. T. D. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 



A little tale of Japan, that beautiful far 
away land of many myths, where the 
cherry blossoms are revered, where the 
babies never cry and where the children 
are always respectful to their parents. 
Such is Tora's Happy Day, a children's 
story simply and plainly told by Florence 
Peltier Perry of Hartford, Conn., and is 
illustrated in the Japanese style by Gain- 
gero Yeto, a graduate of the New York 
Art League. Two of the old mythical 
tales are woven into this story of a boy's 
day ; and it ends with a pretty little lullaby 
now for the first time rendered into 
English. The figures in the illustrations, 
which are in colors, are full of spirit and 
action, and the whole is kissed in dainty 
style. We only regret that the tale ended 
with a day, and did not continue for a full 
week. The price of the story is fifty cents, 
46 pp. Alliance Publishing Co., New 

York. 

* * * * 

A genealogy is apt to be a dry state- 
ment of dates and facts ; not so with A 
Collection of Family Records from 



Bartholomew, Botsford and Winston 
Lines of Genealogy recently compiled 
by Mrs. J. Almeron Pond of Bristol, Conn. 
It is the most breezy little work that has 
recently come to our notice ; from the first 
to the last page the personality of -the 
author appears. The Winston line in 
particular, which we believe has not pre- 
viously been written up, will protfe useful 
to Connecticut genealogists. For sale at 
50 cents by the compiler. 

A fourth volume of Early Connecticut 
Marriages edited by Frederic W. Bailey 
of New Haven is received just as we go to 
press. Mr. Bailey deserves much com- 
mendation for his enterprise in publishing 
these records of early days, all being before 
the year 1800, and gathered from widely 
separated localities. 

The records of eleven churches, cover- 
ing every county in the state, are given. 
In his preface Mr. Bailey makes some very 
pertinent remarks as to the careless man- 
ner in which many of the old records are 
now kept and urges some action for their 
better care and preservation. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES*AND 
POTPOURRI. 



The November number of the Connecticut 
Magazine will contain among other interest- 
ing matter an article " A Case of Witchcraft 
in Hartford," by Charles J. Hoadly, LL. D., 
State Librarian. 

A theme now exciting intense interest 
among cultured ladies is found in the fasci- 
nating story of the "Colonial Dames." Any- 
thing strongly suggestive of that antique 
period seems to add keen zest to the absorb- 
ing subject, which, in some localities, has 
really become a craze of lively discussion 
upon its many varied bearings. 

Apropos thereto, a series of four exquisite- 
ly executed and highly colored pictures of 
Colonial Dames is about to be issued. 

An artistic calendar of the seasons for 1900 
will accompany each design. 

To secure copies of all these without cost, 
clip three shell trade-marks from the front of 
the cartons containing the bottles of Baker's 
Flavoring Extracts, and mail same to Baker 
Extract Company, Springfield, Mass. 

The publishers beg to acknowledge a 
letter from Robert E. Goodwin of Sharon, 
Connecticut, stating that the discharge 
1 paper of Hezekiah Goodwin referred to in 
{the "Rose of Sharon" published in the 
'September number is now in the possession of 
! George D. Goodwin, son of Hezekiah Good- 
jwin instead of grandson as stated in the 
J article. 

The New York World has engaged a num- 
ber of popular song-writers, such as Howard 
land Emerson, authors of " Hello, Ma Baby," 
JMax S. Witt, author of "Moth and Flame," 
etc., to write for it a series of ten songs. 
iThese songs The World has advertised that 
.it will give away with its Sunday paper, one 
each week. This is a gigantic piece of news- 
paper enterprise. It will involve a free 
(distribution of over five million pieces of 
.sheet music among regular readers alone, 
^during the ten weeks. This number, on 
doubt, will be raised materially, as the offer 
Mis made by The World to send the ten songs 
[by mail along with ten weeks subscription 
iko its Sunday paper for fifty cents. London 
parted Sunday papers a few months ago and 
wouldn't make them pay. America's metrop- 
olis supports Sunday papers so materially 
j:hat they are enabled to go into enterprises 
|:hat cost enough to swamp an ordinary 
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Oil Heaters, Tables, Silver &ets, Gold Watches and 
twenty other gifts for disposing of our five and ten 
dollar assortments or toilet articles. 

No Wait for Goods. Premiums where 
you may examine at our office. Write for beautiful 
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can be engaged for Concerts, Religious and Social 
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WRITING AND COPYING INK: 




Equal to the BEST But 

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All kinds and Colors. 

Ask your Dealer for 

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Standard Mucilage sticks bet- 
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POTPOURRI— Continued. 

The publishers of the Connecticut Maga- 
zine announce on another page an advertis- 
ers' contest. They desire good, clean and 
attractive advertisements, and as a special 
inducement to advertisers, and to stimulate 
an active and critical interest among their 
readers in the advertising pages, they 
offer three prizes for the most attrac- 
tive and meritorious advertisement appear- 
ing in the December (Christmas) number. 
This number will be a particularly bright and 
attractive one and the contest should awaken 
advertisers generally to take space in this 
number and to strive for an ad. of excep- 
tional merit. First prize will be awarded 
for the most meritorious advertisement re- 
gardless of space it occupies — winning ad- 
vertisement getting six free insertions in the 
next six following issues, each insertion 
occupying same amount of space as was 
used in the competing advertisement. 
Second prize will be four free insertions, 
and third prize, two free insertions. The 
contest is announced well in advance in 
order to give advertisers sufficient time to 
prepare attractive advertising for this issue. 

It is worth the while for any advertiser to 
try for some free advertising that is good, 
clean and profitable. 

The publishers offer advertisers the benefit 
of yearly rates for a single insertion in this 
number. 

As the furnace fires are started in the fall 
we often notice that a peculiar fume or 
bluish appearance overspreads the piano and 
brightly polished articles of furniture in our 
homes. "Does your piano look blue?" is 
the question that one of our advertisers is 
asking just now. A Washington, D. C. piano 
and organ house writes a letter to the Hart- 
ford Diamoud Polish Company that is con- 
vincing, as will be seen by a glance at the 
advertisement in another column. The Wil- 
cox & White Organ Company of Meriden 
also speak highly of the polish manufactured 
by the Diamond Polish Company. The 
polish has found favor all over the country, 
and is an especially effective application for 
blue pianos. 

A public meeting was held in the 
Acton Library in August to consider 
the feasibilty of erecting some memorial 
i upon the site of the first building of the 
Collegiate School which afterwards became 
Yale College. The act chartering the insti- 
tution was passed in the autumn of 1701. 



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POTPOURRI— Continued. 

The school itself was organized later in the 
same year. In 1702 Nathaniel Lynde 
offered a house and lot for the use of the 
college so long as it should remain in Say- 
brook, and the first fifteen commencements 
were held there. Of the fifty- six graduates at 
these commencements, ten belonged to 
Saybrook families and many of their descend- 
ants have been prominent in the life of the 
town. 

The site of this building is approximately 
if not exactly known, a very trustworthy 
tradition locating it, double the width of the 
building from the west line of the old ceme- 
tery at the Point. Early maps of the 
settlement at the Point confirm the tradition. 

Considerable interest was manifested at 
the meeting and it was the unanimous 
opinion of those present that something 
should be done to mark a spot of such 
historical importance and that this memorial 
should be dedicated, if possible in conjunction 
with the bi-centennial celebration of Yale in 
the autumn of 1901. 

Professor Samuel Hart presided at the 
meeting and was appointed chairman of a 
committee to take the matter into further 
consideration with a view to definite action. 
Professor Hart and the Rev. Dr. A. S. 
Chesebrough have been leaders in arousing 
public interest in the proposed memorial. 
— Hartford C our ant. 

It will interest many women who have 
families to know of the plan operated by the 
Shumway Company of 739 Main Street, 
Hartford, Connecticut. In some respects it 
is similar to the plan used by the Larkin 
Soap Company of Buffalo. 

The Shumway Company sells Household 
Toilet Necessities of the best quality, and 
for orders amounting to $5 or $10 worth 
gives the buyer handsome premiums ; such 
as Morris chairs and couches, handsome 
writing desks for the home, watches, silver 
tea sets, oil heaters, trunks, traveling cases, 
and the like. 

A favorite plan is for five or ten ladies to 
club together and pay a dollar or two dollars 
a month, the whole amounting to $5 or $10, 
in which case each member of the club gets 
five or ten dollars worth of toilet articles and 
a handsome premium from month to month. 
It is their privilege to change any of the 
toilet articles if they choose, or to examine 
premiums at the Shumway Company's rooms. 

Premiums are sent immediately on receipt 
of purchase. The company is sending hand- 
some catalogs to any address without cost. 





Harvey & Lewis, Opticians, PHOTOGRAPHIC 

865 Main St., Hartford, Conn. SUPPLIES. . . . 



ICE 
CREAM 

FRESH 

CANDY 

FANCY 
CAKES 

Telephone 
963. 

JACOBS, 

941 Main St., 
HAETFOKD, 
CONN. 



The Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. 








WM. B- CLARK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E. O. WEEKS, Vice-President. 

A. C ADAMS, HENKY E. RRES, Assistant Secretaries. 

W ONDERFU L 

Our New System of development 
for MAN, WOMAN or CHILD. 

Develops every part of your body. 

increases your vitality. 

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GIVEN to our READERS. 

«« Picturesque Connecticut." 




O doubt many of our readers would 
like a copy of " Picturesque Connec- 
ticut " a handsome thirty- two page 
book just published by The Connecticut Maga- 
zine Company presenting a collection of Con- 
necticut views that is seldom equalled. Let 
us tell you how to possess it. 

Notice that the page opposite is divided 
into ten squares, each numbered consecu- 
tively, marked Connecticut Magazine Pur- 
chase Slip, containing blank space to be 
filled out. We ask our readers to cut out 
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vertising pages of the January, February, 
March, April, May, June, July and August 
numbers of this year. If you have a purchase 
to make try to patronize those whose ads. 
appear in our columns. They are reliable 
houses or we would not carry their ads. With 



each purchase you make, present one of these 
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If you purchase by mail, enclose one of the 
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To any one returning ten slips, properly 
signed, to The Connecticut Magazine office, 
we will present this handsome thirty-two 
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home, and will bring out the most attractive 
scenic features of our state. 

A£t This offer will apply to purchases made 
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months of January, February, March, April, 
May, June, July or August, 1899. 



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helping its advertisers construct 
proper and attractive advertisements. 

Magazine advertisements will per- 
mit of illustration in half-tone or line 
work on account of the superior 
quality of the paper used. 

To advertisers taking a six month's 
contract we will make an appropriate 
design and submit to advertiser for 
approval ; make a half-tone or line 
printing plate — and write the adver- 
tisement if it is desired : This all free 
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tiser the best possible results and to 
make our advertising pages attractive. 

THE 

CONNECTICUT 

MAGAZINE. 



THERE 



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IN A HANDSOME 



FIRE-PLACE, 

WE CARRY ALL SORTS OF . . 

mm mantels 




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The HARTFORD MANTEL and TILE GO. 

E. M. GLOVER, Manager. 

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and Electric Light Fixtures; Fireplace Furniture of all 
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POTPOURRI— Continued. 

There has been an exceptional demand 
for copies of the September Connecticut 
Magazine, containing a sketch of the late 
Rev. Dr. Lamson by Prof. Williston Walker. 
Below are a few newspaper quotations on 
this article : 

"The Connecticut Magazine contains in 
its current issue a very interesting sketch of 
the late Rev. Dr. Charles M. Lamson, written 
by Prof. Williston Walker. The half-tone 
engravings of Dr. Lamson are very artistic 
and true to life. There are two of them, a 
portrait and a picture of him at work in his 
study. Besides being a sketch of his life the 
article is also an eloquent tribute to his 
memory." — Hartford Post. 

" It shows two splendid portraits, without 
doubt the best ever published of him. 

— The Worcester Spy. 

"It will be of special interest to many in this 
vicinity, who had personal acquaintance with 
Dr. Lamson. The article is illustrated by 
two portraits." 

— The Daily News, New Britain, Conn. 

Persons desiring copies of this number 
should order them early as the edition is 
nearly exhausted. 

Theory without practice is unproductive. 
Scarcely a day passes but that we hear some 
one propounding some excellent idea that 
will elevate the human race, or some bright 
scheme that will make its inventor immensely 
wealthy, and ten to one the man with whom 
the thought originates is wholly unfit to see 
it through to its practical attainments : in 
other words the man of original ideas is sel- 
dom a good business man. It is pleasing to 
note both of these qualities in the abundant 
success of the Williams & Carleton Company 
of Hartford. As compounders of extracts 
and medicines they are universally recog- 
nized. An instance is the careful study it 
has required to produce a remedy for corns 
that cures, and then to get the people to using 
it. Since they introduced their Williams 
Electric Corn Salve they have sold thousands 
of packages right here in New England, and 
the sale has been assisted largely through 
mail order mediums and limited price, which 
is 15 cents to any address, but the price is 
secondary, for it is invariably merit then 
market with this Company. 



TO NEW YORK DAILY. 




Stopping at all Connecticut River Landings. 



LOW EATES. 


SECURITY. 


Quick Dispatch. 


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Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. m. and 
forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecticut river, mid 
points North, East and West from Hartford. We also h>i > e 
through traffic arrangements with lines out of New York ><r 
points South and West, and shipments can be forwarded on 
through rates, and Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the 
Company. For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co.= 

Steamers "Middletown" and "Hartfokd" — Leave Hart- 
ford from foot State St. at 5 p. m.— Leave New York from Pier 
24, East River, at 5 p. m.— Daily except Sundays. 



CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY 

Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. 



SENT FREE 




For 1899, 

Is now ready for distribution, 



It contains over one hundred attractive half- 
tone illustrations, and is without doubt the 
handsomest book of the kind ever issued i<| 
any lailroad. It contains an increased list of 
Hotels and Boarding Houses, gives rates for 
board and all information sought after by thiV« 
intending to summer in the country. Don't 
neglect getting a copy. Sent free for postage, 
six cents. 

W. J. MARTIN, Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Hartford, Conn. 



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SELECT PREMIUMS 

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Send in each subscription as it is taken and we will give you due credit for each. On the 
remittance of the fifth we will mail you postpaid your choice of anyone of the premiums below. 



EITHER OF THESE 

Handsome and Useful Ingersoll Watches, 





Nickel or gilt, stem wound and stem 
set, and WARRANTED for one year. 
If the watch is not what we guarantee 
it to be we will replace it by another. 
Your choice of either pocket watch or 
the new bicycle watch and attach- 
ment. Watch can be attached to handle bar of any wheel at a 
moment's notice 

Your Choke— Famous Arms Pocket Books. 





Fine Morocco Ladies Pocket 
Book with card pocket. Specie 
pocket, three extra pockets with 
button locks ; card a pocket with 
tuck. 



Fine Morocco Combination 
Safety Purse and Pocket-Book. 
Strongly made in neat and at- 
tractive styles, and adapted for 
gentlemen's or ladies 7 use. 

Three pockets ; double lock. 



\F 



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*£ 



PQ C> 



rt „, cc 

I-*-" ~ c 



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e a* 



m 



Address THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn, 



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1 



A Gift to Our Patrons. 

Pictures of Dames of Colonial Days. 

ABSOLUTELY FREE. 






The advent of the Twentieth Century joyously heralds an 
era of prosperity— the greatest in our national history. 

The example of the patriotic and heroic people of the past 
is ever an incentive to future generations to the emulation of 
true ardor; and while we take pride in the achievements ot men 
who, by their efforts made it possible for us to keep alive the 
spirit of patriotism, we should not forget their brave com- 
panions, who shrank not from labor or sacrifice in gaining for 
us the blessed inheritance which we now enjo5 T . What more 
interesting subject, therefore, can we present to our friends than 
the women ot Colonial Days ? 

An exquisitely artistic calendar, as a souvenir of 1900, has 
been prepared by us for our pattons, free of cost. On each of 
its four pages appear the picture of a dame, New York being 
clad in the lively Dutch costume; Pennsylvania in the sedate 
gray garb of the Quaker; Massachusetts in the austere Puritan 
attire and Virginia in the rich Elizabethian dress. 

Lack of space in a brief circular precludes an extended 
description or close criticism of these four beautiful portraits. 
Suffice to say. that each is a rich gem within itself. 

A brief history of each colony accompanies the pictures; 
and a calendar for each of the seasons is most exquisitely 
wrought. 

This beautiful work has been copyrighted, and it cannot be 
purchased at any store or elsewhere. To each of our patrons 
desiring a copy,- the same will be mailed free on receipt of 
three of our : hell trade mark designs, cut from the front of the 
cartons or wrappers enclosing the bottles of our Extracts. 

The number of these calendars has been limited, and the 
coupons may be sent at any time between now and the 25th ot 
next December. The souvenir will be forwarded.: in therorder 
of reception of coupons recorded, and those anxious for the 
early copy will do well to bear closely in mind the purport of 
the old maxim, "First come, first served." 

Address, 

Baker Extract Co , Springfield, Mass 




This competition 
is open to any 
one sending us a 
2c stamp for 
application blank 
containing the 
eleven rules gov- 
erning the com- 
petition, and all 
other necessary 
information. 

To stimulate an 
active and critical 
int.erest in Edison 
Phonograph Records 
$2,QpO is offered in 
prizes for the best 
descriptions /of these 
Records. This 
competition is 
arranged and guar- 
anteed by the Na- 
tional Phonograph 
Company by whom 
a book Qf explanation 
is printed for 
. distribution by the 

fiartfejra 
GrapDopftone 

(7* Edwin T. 
Jt»v»t Northam, Mgr 

80 Trumbull St., 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



$2000° 





(pMPET/rroH 



Vol. V. 



November, 1899. 



No. 11. 



THE 



CONNECTICUT 
M AGA 




AN ILLVSTRATED 
MONTHLY 




IN THIS NUMBER. 

(^w t^* £?* 

The Plantation of Thirty- 
Mile Island. 

Roaring Brook, Cheshire. 

A Case of Witchcraft in 
Hartford. 

Old Milford Houses. 

From the Diary of Mason 
Fitch Cogswell. 
Etc., Etc. 

i2Fi 10^* t&^* 

See Contents on First Page 



? 




$1.00 a Year. HARTFORD, CONN. IO cts. a Copy. 




Paid up Capital $1,000,000.00 

RAVELERS 



NSURANCE 



tf eCT/ 4t,v * OF 

HARTFORD, 



All 



Co 



CONN. 
JAMES G.BATTERSON, PRESIDENT 



INSURE 
IN 



the T ravelers. 

r»e UADTcnon rv 



OLDEST, 
LARGEST, 

AND BEST. 



OF HARTFORD, CONN. 

LIFE ENDOWMENT, and 

ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

OF ALL FORMS. 



HEALTH POLICIES 



INDEMNITY FOR DISABILITY CAUSED 
BY SICKNESS. 



LIABILITY INSURANCE SS^ZZ.- 

Owners of Buildings, Horses, ano Vehicles, can all be protected by policies 
in THE TRAVELERS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



PAID-UP CASH CAPITAL, $1,000,000.00 
ASSETS, . 26,499,822.74 



LIABILITIES, . . $22,708,701.82 
EXCESS, l%* BASIS 3.791,120.92 



[GAINS: 6 Months, January to July, 1899. 
In Assets, $1,184,380.28 Increase in Reserves (both dept's), $1,478,549.62 



S. C. DUNHAM, Vice-Pres.dent. H. J. MESSENGER, Actuary. 

JOHN E. MORRIS Secretary. E. V. PRESTON, Sup-t of Agencies. 




Flease mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



THE 

Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



NOVEMBER, 1899. 



vol. v. CONTENTS. n . \u 


November, 


(Frontispiece.) 


The Plantation of Thirty Mile Island. Illustrated 


Eveline Warner Brainerd, 543 


Two Sonnets. 


Bert F. Case, 552 


Poems on Roaring Brook, Cheshire. 


Illustrated by Ellsworth Sperry. 


An Outlook. 


E. W. Ellsworth, 553 


Roaring Brook. 


J. R. Paddock, 554 


A Passage of Scenery in Connecticut. 


N. P. Willis, 556 


A Case of Witchcraft in Hartford. 


Charles J. Hoadly, LL. D., 557 


Extracts from the Diary of Dr. Mason F. Cogswell. 


II. Illustrated, 




Compiled by Ellen Strong Bartlett, 562 


The Old Houses of Milford. Illustrated. 


M. Zoztise Greene, 570 


Departments. — Genealogical Department. 


585 


Editorial. 


588 


Book Notes. 


588 


George C. Atweee, Editor. 


Edward B. Eaton, Business Manager. 



All communications should be addressed to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, Conn. Remittances 
should be by check, express order, P. 0. money order or registered letter. Money by mail at sender's risk. We 
promptly acknowledge by postal card all subscriptions received l>y mail. "When change of address is desired give 
both old and new address. Do not subscribe of a person unknown to you. Our authorized agents have full 
credentials. 



$1.00 a Year. THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. JO Cents a Copy. 

Published at 66 State St., Hartford, Conn, by The Connecticut Magazine Co. 



Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn, as mail matter of the teccnd-clatt. 



EDUCATIONAL 



The Connecticut Agricultural College* 






" 111 fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, 
Where wealth accumulates, and men decay. 
Princes and lords may flourish or may fade, — 
A breath can make them, as a breath has made ; 
But a bold peasantry, their country's pride, 
When once destroyed, can never be supplied," 

It has been truly said that " Education is a debt that the present owes to the future," 
but all are not agreed as to just how that debt shall be paid. Those, however, who have 
given the subject the most careful thought, and have studied intelligently the history of the 
past, concur in the opinion that the education to be projected into the future, the education 
that shall preserve and entail free institutions, should be directed by minds the best equipped 
in mental and moral science, literature and art, mathematical knowledge and mechanical 
skill, and physical law in the realm of nature. In this the Federal Government takes the 
initiative, and asks the States to build and equip colleges which shall give to the " Industrial 
Classes" not only practical education but also the skill to use it, and with her request gives 
the State of Connecticut annually by the " Land Grant " act of '62, over $6,000, and by the 
Morrill act of '90, $25,000 after this year; but conditionally, each fund for specific uses and 
nothing else. 

The Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs, Connecticut, in the town of Mansfield, 
is the college established by the State to meet conditions, on which the Federal funds may 
be received and used. All students of the State over fifteen years of age of both sexes are 
entitled to the privileges of this college, so far as its equipment will meet the demands 
made upon it. 







The fall term began September 18, and will continue to December 19, followed by a 
recess till January 2, 1900. The winter term will give the senior class a choice of three 
elective courses : — "General," "Agricultural," and "Horticultural." 

There will also be a " Dairy Course " for special students from January 1 to March 23. 

FOR INFORMATION AND CATALOGUES, 

Address GEORGE W. FLINT, President, Storrs, Conn. 

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..TAPESTRY PAINTINGS.. 

2000 Tapestry Paintings to Choose From* 30 Artists 
Employed, including Gold Medalistsjpf the Paris Salon. 

When in New York don't fail to call and see these paintings. You will be welcomed. Make this 
place a point of interest. "We rent Tapestry Paintings. Send 25c. for Compendium of J 40 Studies. 



JTrmtic fiome Decorations 



ts 



"VYT can show you effects NEVER before thought \T7"t-»\7 have your house decorated and painted by 
" e of, and at moderate prices too. *V ny inferior wo'kmen, when you can have it 

done by skilled workmen— by artists — for the same 
price. 

Write for Color Schemes, Designs, Estimates. ARTISTS SENT TO 
ALL PARTS OP THE WORLD, to execute every sort of Deco- 
rating and painting. We are educating the Country in Color 
Harmony. 

Wall Paper, Stained Glass, 
Relief, Carpets, Furniture, 
Parquetry Tiles, Window Shades, 
Art Hangings, Draperies, Etc. 

"VYT" It D an /,« c New styles designed by gold medal artists. From 10 
W ail .T apCIo* cents per rt-ll up. Send 50 cents to prepay express- 
age on large sample books and drapery. A quantity of last year's paper 
$1 and $2 per roll ; now 10 and S5 cents. Will include drapery samples in 
package. See our Antique Metalic, French, Pressed Silks, and Lida effects 
in special colors to match all kinds of woodwork, rarpots and draperies. Have 
5u0 different wall hangings with draperies specially'made at our Broomhead 
Mills, Patterson, N. J., to match. 

T}t*^r\&rit><2 ^ e nave Draperies to match all wall papers from 15 cents 
■L/rapcrlcS. a yard. Th s is a very important feature to attain the 
acme of artistic excellence in decoration. No matter how much or how 
little you want to spei d you must have harmony of form and colorings. 
Write us for samples. Special Silk Draperies made at our Broomhead Mills, 
Paterson, N.J. Encourage Home Iudustry ? Write us for samples. 

HTarvx:*™- M^rotnslQ We manufacture, Tapestry Materials.' Supe' 
1 cipc^LI y lVlcllCI ld.15* nor to foreign goods and half the price 



Book of samp'es, 10 cents. Send 
wide No. 6 goods, worth $3.00. 



.50 for trial order, for 2 yards of 50-inch 



Decorative Advice. 




Upon receipt of $1. Mr. Douthitt will answer 
any question on interior decorations— color- 
harmony and harmony of form harmony of wall coverings, carpets, curtains, tiles, furniture, 
gas fixtures, etc. 

The art book of the century. 200 royal quarto 
page* filled, with full-page colored illustra- 
tions of modern home interiors and studies. Price, $2. If you_want tcTbe up in decoration 
send $2 for this book, worth $50. 

^rVinr»T ^ ix n - noui " tapestry painting lessons, in studio, $5. Complete written instruc- 
k->CIlUUl» tions by mail $1. Tapestry paintings rented; full size drawings, paints, 
brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere, Paris not accepted, are such advantages offered pupils. 
Send $1 for complete instructions in tapestry painting and compendium of 140 studies. 

Over 100 new styles for wall coverings, at 25 cents 
per yard, 35 inches wide, thus costing the same 
as wall paper at $1 per roll. 240 kinds of Japanese Lida leather papei s, at $2 per roll. 

(~* f^LA 1^ A *«f T > i*«'jt-\d»«T7- Grecian, Russian, Venetian, Br^zil'an, Roman, Rococco, 
VJUD11I1 £\Tl J-/rapery\ Dresden, Fesioon College Stripe, Marie Antoinetie, 
Indian, Calcutta, Bombay, Delft, Soud n, from 10 cents a yard to -5 cents. 

In order that we may introduce this line of NEW ART GOODS, we will send one yard 
each of 50 different kinds of our mos! choice Patterns for $7.50. 



Manual of Art Decorations. 



Goblin Printed Burlaps, 



John R Douthitt, 

&<£><£<£> 286 Fifth Avenue, New York. Near 30th St. 



American Tapestry- 
Decorative Co. 




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fV DIRECT WATER ROUTE FROM '<H 

NEW YORK to CHARLESTON 
and JACKSONVILLE 

FLORIDA 

last Modem He Three Weekly 
Steamships, \ Sailings, 
From Fier45MR.NewYork. 

RAIL CONNECTIONS TO ALL SOUTHERN RESORTS 



£ BOWLING GREEK, NEW YORK I ^IJi'^t^h^?' 




^3? 



A. P. LANE, N. E. Agent, 201 Washington Street, BOSTON. 



TO NEW YORK DAILY, 




Stopping at all Connecticut Hirer Landings. 



LOW EATES. 


SECURITY. 


Quick Dispatch. 


COMFORT. 


Passenger and 
Freight Line. 


REFRESHING 
SLEEP. 



Tassenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. m. and 
forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecticut river, and 
points North, East and West from Hartford. We also have 
through traffic arrangements with lines out of New York or 
points South and West, and shipments can be forwarded on 
through rates, arcl Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the 
Company. For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co.^= 

Steamers "Middlktown" and "Haktfokd"— Leave Hart- 
ford from foot State St. at 5 p. m.— Leave New York from Pier 
24, East River, at 5 p. m.— Daily except Sundays. 



DIRECT ROUTE to the WEST 

with only one change of cars between 
Hartford and Chicago. 




The shortest, cheapest and most convenient route. 
Train haves Har.ford at 12.40 P. M., connects at 
Campbell Hall with fast express over O. W. and 
Wabash road, arriving at Chicago ntxt day 9 P. M. 
Only one night on road. 

CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY. 

Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. 

For information apply to 

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Hartford, Conn. 



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37 



The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. 5. 



November, 1899. 



No. n 



T& 



»** : ; ■ - ,5r 




THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



BY EVELINE WARNER BRAINERD. 



THE Rhine, the Hudson an<i the Con- 
necticut have been called the three 
most beautiful rivers in the world. No 
one disputes the fascinations of the Rhine, 
teeming with legend and histor}, lined by 
vineyards, guarded by castles. None 
forget the frowning hill-tops that hem in 
the Hudson's majesty. But even the 
traveled may not, for lack of knowledge, 
add the third name of the list, and the 
lover of the gentle, the varied, the ever- 
exquisite Connecticut must sometimes 
543 



fight for his mistress, or hold a dignified 
peace when his enthusiastic praise gains 
the careless greeting, "The Connecticut? 
Oh yes, a pretty little stream ; " or, as 
once met the writer's amazed ears, " But 
you know, the water is so muddy." It is 
idle to combat the opinions of the con- 
tentedly nearsighted and ignorant. He 
who knows his river-love at its gay begin- 
ning in the mountains ; its soberer path 
among the fair lands of Massachusetts ; 
its varied and nobler valley in its own 



544 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



state ; its broad, still entrance to the 
Sound, may listen with unconcern to the 
criticism of those who know not whereof 
they speak. 

Half way between Saybrook and Hart- 
ford, about the elm and willow fringed 
island where the long-passed Wangunks 
best loved to meet, lies the town of Had- 
dam, the Plantation of Thirty Mile Island. 
In the days of its settlement it was de- 
scribed as stretching " six miles to the 
eastward and six miles to the westward 




JOHN G. C. BRAINARD. 

into the wilderness, from the great river." 
Four Indian kings and two queens gave 
the deed for the small township, and 
thirty coats, of one hundred dollars value, 
here bought as much of beauty perhaps 
as ever changed hands for so small a sum. 
The few acres at Pattaquonk to the south- 
west, and the Island, with the right to 
hunt and fish at will, were all that the 
natives reserved. Duiing the Indian wars 
aid was asked of the court at Hartford 
because of " Sculking enemies that are 



come downe to lye about and amongst 
these plantations to annoy and destroy as 
they can catch." The advice was re- 
turned that the settlers " Doe forthwith 
agree and come and gather in the two 
uppermost best garrisoned places in their 
town to assist and defend each other or 
agree to remove to some other plantation 
upon the river as they may best provide 
for themselves and their families." The 
" two best garrisoned places " seems to 
have proved sufficient defense, for the 
plantation was never deserted and no 
tale of massacre gives the touch of tragedy 
to the annals of these farming people. 

Fifty years ago, wretched remnants of 
the natives lived on the lonely and wooded 
road between Haddam Center and Pon- 
set. In the soil of Thirty Mile Island 
have been found the bones of those who 
long ago left its beauty. In the fields, 
especially those by the river, the plow has 
turned up arrow heads, spear heads, 
hammers and chisels. Beaver Brook has 
surrendered the drinking cups long ago 
given to its keeping. On the " Neck " 
linger, in the name " Indian Hollow," the 
echoes of the last gatherings of the Wan- 
gunks. But the land that once knew 
their dark faces holds hardly more trace 
of them to-day than does the river of the 
reflection of last summer's clouds and 
leafage. 

It was in 1662 that twenty- eight young 
Englishmen came from Hartford to make 
their homes in the unopened lands of the 
Connecticut valley. In the records of 
1668 is found the enactment " That the 
Plantation of Thirty Mile Island shall for 
the future be called Haddum & this court 
grants them the powers and preulige of a 
Plantation." The hearts of the colonists 
were turned toward this new world. Prob- 
ably none were ever again to see the home 
beyond the ocean, but to the rough clearing 
in the woods they gave the name of Haddam 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



545 



in memory of those distant villages, Much 
Hadham and Little Hadham, where the 
childhood of most of their number had 
been spent. To-day their descendants, 
with an unexpected throb of kinship, read 
in the churchyard beside the ancient 



young colony. Doubtless these settlers 
had belonged on the Parliamentary side 
of the late Civil War, in which Hertford 
County had been so active ; but most of 
them, also, must have looked back with 
pride to the manly Lord of Hadham Hall, 





THE CONNECTICUT FROM SWAN'S HII.T, HIGGANUM. 



stone church at Hadham, the names Bates, 
Butler, Clark, Shayler, Spencer, Wells ; 
names that mark stones in every burying 
ground of the new settlement. As the old 
Hadham was in Hertford County, so the 
new was in the Hartford County of the 



Arthur Capel. Lord Cape! was the first 
to present in Parliament the wrongs of the 
people, the first also to turn to the King 
when opposition grew radical. His troops 
gathered from about his seat, brought 
Cromwell in haste to the defense of Cam- 



546 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



bridge. To Lord Capel, more than to 
any other of the king's friends, is due the 
gallant but disastrous continuation of the 
war in 1648. He followed his royal mas- 
ter to the scaffold, for, in the words of a 
chronicler, " he was a gallant gentleman 
and they durst not let him live." 

As the new Haddam spread to the 
eastern side of the river the settlers clung 
with even pathetic faithfulness to the old 
name. So grew East Haddam to the 
south, Haddam Neck on the point be- 
tween the junction of the Salmon and the 
Connecticut, and north of the Neck, on 




an old spinet. 

Originally in family of Dr. Hezekiah Brainerd. Built 
one of the first brought to this country. Now 
Mr. Randolph P. Hayden. 



the sharp ridge between the Salmon's 
western branch, Pine Brook, and the 
' great river, ' Middle Haddam. This last 
mentioned is now in a separate town and 
has moved northward, and into the valley, 
until so far from its family that one must 
look back two centuries, and, driving 
along the crest of Hog Hill, come sud- 
denly on the original burying ground 
before one can see the significance of the 
name. 

On the bluff below the mouth of Salmon 
river, buried in sumach and huckleberry, 
lies the mossed and broken stones of the 



" Cove Graveyard." Strangely placed it 
seems on the lonely point. It was chosen 
suddenly one winter day when a sad pro- 
cession on its way to the meeting house 
of the main plantation found the river 
impassable. The inconvenience of the 
dividing waters caused many contentions 
of which the colonial records show traces, 
and among the enactments in this con- 
nection was very early, one for a separate 
"Trayne Band " for Haddam East, and 
later that for placing of sign posts on each 
side of the river to which the goods in the 
execution sales of each district might be 
brought according to the 
ordinance of the time. 

Near the point where Pine 
brook and the Salmon join 
to separate Haddam East 
from the older township, 
rises little Mount Tom, the 
home of all the mystery and 
romance that belonged to 
the settlement. J. G. C. 
Brainard, who as a youth 
taught the village school 
near the banks of the Sal- 
mon, wrote of the stream : 
" Here, say wild men, the 

Indian Magi made 
Their spells by moonlight ; 
or beneath the shade 
That shrouds sequestered rock, or darken- 
ing glade 
Or tangled dell. 

Here Phillip came and Miantonimo, 
And asked about their fortunes long ago, 
As Saul to Endor, that her witch might 

show 
Old Samuel. 

And here the Black fox roved, that howled 

and shook 
His thick tail to the hunters, by the brook 
Where they pursued their game and him 

mistook 
For earthly fox." 



in 1748. Probably 
in possession of 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



547 



In other verse is found the fate of the 
hunters according to the legend ; ' 

" Onward they go and never turn, 
Spending a night that meets no day ; 
For them shall never morning sun, 
Light them upon their endless way." 

Brainard alone is to be thanked for our 
knowledge of these imaginings that made 
part of our forbear's life. He tells us of the 
Shad Spirit, who yearly led the shad from 
the Gulf of Mexico to the Connecticut. 

" Though the wind is light, the wave is 

white, 
With the fleece of the 

flock that's near ; 
Like the breath of the 

breeze, he comes 

over the seas, 
And faithfully leads 

them here. 



; 






And now he's past 

the bolted door, 
Where the rusted 

horse shoe clings, 
So carry the nets to 

the nearest shore, 
And take what the 

Shad Spirit brings." 

The fame of the 
black fox and the 
shad spirit have 

spread little further than their special 
domains, but the noises of Matchit 
Moodus were of importance, attracting the 
attention of the scientists, as well as of the 
poets. Many a tale and theory has arisen 
to account for the sounds coming from 
the foundations of Mount Tom. Dr. Field 
records the explanation given by an old 
Indian, "The Indian's God was very angry 
because the Englishmen's God was come 
here. The white men in turn reported 
that a giant carbuncle caused the terrify- 
ing rumblings. In Brainard's most suc- 



cessful ballad, "Matchit Moodus," this 
stone was removed by a magician." 

Of all that was familiar to the settlers, 
to their children and their grandchildren, 
scarcely a trace is left. A bar window, 
such as is to be found often in English 
inns to-day, tells the history of one dwell- 
ing cf the time of the Revolution; an 
ancient spinet, the treasure of one house- 
hold, dates further back to the time when 
the luxuries and culture of the mother 
country were becoming more common in 
the colonies. Other buildings may have 
stood one hundred and fifty years, and 




ANCIENT HOUSE, HADDAM NECK. 



other treasures may be tucked away among 
family heirlooms ; but patent to the passer- 
by is but one unmistakable reminder of 
the earliest days, the flist burying ground. 
It lies at the junction of the turnpike with 
the old road, on which stood the first 
houses of the settlement. Four dwellings 
now stand where two hundred years ago 
beside the level meadow and sheltered to 
north and west by wooded slopes lay the 
greater part of the plantation. The church 
lots, carefully set apart to the service of 
the ministry forever, have long ago passed 



54 8 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



into other hands. Wells 7 brook still flows 
beneath the steep sides of Walkley Hill, 
winding about the ruins of a modern 
factory as it wound about the first shop 
and trip hammer of the settlement, but 
few would know it by its ancient name. 

A mile below this hamlet grew a second 
cluster of houses, " the Lower Plantation," 
now become Shailerville. On the creek 
at the head of this group masses of dark 
foliage hang over brown water and give 
an air of mystery to the site of that cheery 
place, the grist mill. This was probably 
the first, and it was enacted that " Euary 
Monday shall be the day for Euary one to 
cary his Corne to the Mille to grinde." 
Till within a few years the tumbling boards 
of a later mill peered from the growth of 
alder and hemlock ; now only the clinging 
name, Mill creek, recalls the stream's im- 
portance. An arch carries the drive over 
the placid water. To the east, and above, 
runs the railroad bridge, and framed by 
the brown-stone piers is the picture of the 
meeting of the creek and river. 

In 1668 came to Haddam, the "very 
reverend and famous Mr. Nicholas 
Noyes," the second pastor, a man of note. 
After leaving this settlement he took 
charge at Salem and became prominent 
in the witch-craft persecutions that have 
cast a lurid glow over the name of the 
town. A man of real power, despite his 
part in an insane work, it was hard to 
satisfy the society for his loss. 

Though there had been service held in 
the township from the earliest days, not 
till 1695 did the general court " counte- 
nance and encourage the good people of 
Haddam to imbody themselues in a 
church estate." Only two years later the 
court at Hartford appointed a committee 
" to view the lands on both sides of the 
river to consider whether there be a 
sufficient quantity of land on each side of 
the river for the accommodation of inhabi- 



tants whereby each side may be capable 
of maintaining a minister." In the next 
year, however, Haddam East was advised 
" to indevour a loving and christianlike 
unitye with their brethren in the worship 
of God upon such termes as may be for 
their mutuall comfort." The required 
state of mind did not follow for two years 
more, and the authority for a second 
church was granted. 

For the next twenty-five years the 
settlement grew steadily ; the frame houses 
stretched northward to Higganumpus. 
Half way between the present villages of 
Haddam and Higganum was the home of 
Hezekiah Brainerd. A slight depression 
beneath the gnarled apple tree of a 
sloping field now tells the sharp eyes 
where were born the famous brothers, 
David and John Brainerd. Their father, 
Hezekiah Brainerd, was a man prominent 
and respected in the state, a representa- 
tive, speaker of the House, member of 
the Council. At his death it was resolved 
by the assembly "That it is consistent 
with justice that this Assembly allow 
something out of the publick treasury 
towards the defraying of the charge of the 
interment of the Worshipful Hez. Barinerd, 
Esqr. This Assembly grant out of the 
Publick treasury to that end and use the 
sum of ten pounds " 

David Brainerd's life was but thirty 
years. He followed his chosen work as a 
missionary but three. His fame, with 
that of the devoted younger brother, is 
treasured wherever the aim of the mis- 
sionary is honored. Fathered by the elder 
Edwards, breathing its earnest, thoughtful 
spirit in the form peculiar to the time, it 
is not surprising that, in its day, his journal 
was of wide interest. The sympathy ex- 
cited by the writer's expulsion from Yale, 
the novelty of his work, his early death, 
all might have added to temporary inter- 
est. But when the record of the mental 






THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



549 



struggles of a quiet and short life holds a 
place in religious thought after one hun- 
dred and fifty years, it must have been 
penned by one singularly strong and 
sincere. Its self-analysis seems to us 
morbid ; its unsullied spirituality, marvel- 
ous. Dr. Edwards, writing of Brainerd at 
the time of his expulsion from Yale , says 
" he had the Unhappiness to have a 
Tincture of that intemperate and indis- 



from his religious tasks, his own mainte- 
nance and the teaching of his people, sim- 
ple farming and building, called for hard 
physical toil. In the duodecimo diaries, 
bound in parchment or thick paper, hardly 
a mention is made of these outside tasks, 
but increasing weakness of body tells that 
his work is killing him. 

After David's death the brother, John 
succeeded to the employ of the " Scottish 




...Si 



THE RIVER FROM BELOW TYEERVILLE. 



creet zeale which was at that time preva- 
lent — " a suggestion of imperfection which 
is not ungrateful to the average reader. 

After a year with the Indians between 
Stockbridge and Albany, of which the 
only trace remaining is the name, Brain- 
erd's Bridge, on the Reading R. R., he 
went to the Indian settlement in New 
Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania, then a 
wilderness, separated from the outposts of 
civilization by days of lonely travel. Aside 



Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts," and later was the first 
missionary of the Presbyterian church. 
His labors are largely confined to the 
Indians about Trenton, and as the settle- 
ment moved rapidly westward, he was 
never isolated as the pioneer had been. 
His journal, by no means as abstract as 
that of his brother, shows him tramping 
miles over his scattered parish, a farmer, 
school teacher, advocate, as well as clergy- 



550 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



man. With all this he was an active 
trustee of Princeton,then in its beginnings ; 
moderator of the General Assembly, and a 
distinct influence among the powerful men 
then forming the clergy of northern New 
Jersey. During the French and Indian 
Wars he served as chaplain while his 
people fought with the English. When at 
length the customary stealing of the 
Indian's lands was completed his charges 
were removed to western New York and 
he took a pastorate at Deerfield, Mass. 
Of the two, Dr. Field writes, " In their 
native place the saying was, ' Although 
not so great a son, John was as holy as his 
brother David.' " 

On the crest of the hill above the 
county jail buildings lies a pasture, the 
"old house lot," but little trace of the 
building is found from which the field is 
named. Here, from 1739 to 1746, dwelt, 
while pastor of the town, the Rev. Aaron 
Cleveland,ancestor of President Cleveland, 
and of Bishop Arthur Cleveland Coxe. 
The minister's enthusiastic belief in the 
methods of Whitfield, then causing much 
dissension, together with the effect on his 
salary of the " sink in money," shortened 
his pastorate, though these difficulties did 
not prevent a second call to him a few 
years later. 

When the old red house of the Rev. 
Eleazer May was torn down there was 
saved the painted panel above the "keep- 
ing room " mantel. It is a large board, 
presenting a spirited hunting scene. Red 
coated hunters on brown steeds prance 
over an expanse of green paint. Through 
the center of the field zigzags a blue 
stream, while in an unusual tree in the 
foreground sits a fat squirrel so large that 
the presence of horsemen for his capture 
is no anomaly. This is the remaining 
specimen of the work of Mistress Sybil 
Huntington, wife of Parson May. Their 
story runs somewhat on this fashion ; Mr. 



May in his romantic youth found little 
paintings displayed for sale in some shop. 
Falling in love with the works of art he 
vowed his willingness to do the same to 
the artist should he meet her. They met ; 
the painting of the hunt decorated the 
parsonage wall, and the painter laid aside 
her brush to serve her husband and his 
parish. This pastorate of forty-seven years, 
commencing before the Revolution, 
streched into the next century. [In it 
what is known as the "old meeting house" 
was built, and those industries were started 
which brought to the town its greatest 
prosperity. 

The hills among which the settlement 
lies are composed of gneiss, and from 
1762 quarrying for the fine-grained blue 
stone has been carried on. Deacon Ezra 
Brainerd, as his name comes down to us, 
though he was the town's representative 
in the Assembly almost as long as he was 
church officer, opened the quarries on 
Haddam Neck. For many years the 
business made the hillsides noisy and 
dotted the river with sail. Now one must 
search for the " deacon's seat," the stone 
where the old man was used to sit, over- 
looking his home nearby, his work beneath 
his feet, and far below the broad stream 
and the distances of broken rising country. 
He would hardly recognize the view of 
which every line must have been learned 
by heart in these sunset hours of watching. 
The faces of ruthlessly opened stone beds 
are covered by soft verdure ; acres that 
were grain fields and gardens are fast re- 
turning to forest, and the growth of young 
trees hides the long valley. One cannot 
wander over the quiet roads without 
rebelling that so few know aught of the 
beauty held in the few steep miles of 
Haddam Neck. 

From the beginning the "Trayne 
Band " had held there, as throughout New 
England, a foremost place in the town 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



55* 



life. Jarrad Spencer, the wealthiest and 
most important of the settlers was probably 
the first leader mentioned in the records 
of 1675 as " Commissionated by the 
Councill to be their ensigne to command 
them according to lawe." The middle 
of the present century saw the death of 
the institution of the village militia, and 
with it went that festivity, still 
fresh in the memory of many 
who as children counted the 
weeks to its coming, the an- 
nual "general training." At 
the outbreak of the Revolu- 
tion, however, these organiza- 
tions were in full vigor and 
formed everywhere the start- 
ing points for the future army. 
On tiny scraps of yellowed 
paper are preserved the names 
enrolled in the militia com- 
panies, and the accounts of 
ammunition collected for 
each. So many balls, so much 
powder from one and another 
citizen — read the old lists, 
giving an idea of the personal 
element that gave power to 
the public side in the mar- 
velous contest. Among the 
names of high rank in the 
Revolutionary struggle stands 
one belonging to this village, 
Abram Tyler, Captain, Major, 
Lieutenant, Colonel. A plain 
white stone and the flag mark 
his grave in the old burying 
yard. Neither flag nor stone 
mark the graves of his followers from the 
village, yet on its Lexington Alarm list, 
headed by Col. Tyler, are the names of 
thirty-two of his townsmen, and though 
the records are imperfect it is known that 
Haddam men served on Long Island, at 
West Point and Rhode Island. 

In that charming corner of Higganum, 



"The Landing," the business of shipbuild- 
ing had been carried on for several years 
before the war. There are legends of 
several vessels from these docks engaged 
in the struggle, but the " Harlequin " and 
the "Sampson," are mentioned in the list 
of privateers. The Sampson, manned 
largely from the town where it was built 



'*&**'- : , 




THE OLD CHESTNUT TREE. 

made a gallant fight in the Sound against 
the British " Swallow." It paid for the 
victory later, when it was captured in the 
English Channel and one of those prison 
ships whose very mention sickens the 
heart, received, never to set free, the offi- 
cers and crew. The village took that 
quiet share in the war that fell to the lot of 



552 



THE PLANTATION OF THIRTY MILE ISLAND. 



its state, the giving of its children, the 
storing of every resource to supply the 
army with ammunition, clothing and food, 
the waiting for news of far-away fighting. 
But once did any touch of the picturesque 
or thrilling reach the secluded corner. 
Close on the triumphant close of the 
contest, American soldiers on their march 
from Rhode Island to Yorktown passed 
through the place. On what was then the 
turnpike running through Shailerville, 
stands, ragged and hollow and nearing its 
fall, the great chestnut tree under which 
they rested, and opposite, little marked 
by the hundred years, is the farm house 
whose owners added to the scanty soldier 
fare. 

Dr. Hezekiah Brainerd, a cousin of the 



missionaries, and Corneius Higgins, whose 
family dwelt in the now ruinous and well- 
nigh forgotten hamlet of Zoah, voted 
"aye" in the name of the town at the con- 
vention for the adoption of the constitu- 
tion of the United States. In the place 
of the Plantation of Thirty Mile Island 
was a thriving township of four villages 
and outlying districts. With the hundreds 
like it, it had borne its small share in the 
forming of the new nation. It was now a 
part of the republic, its inhabitants no 
longer colonists, but citizens of the Ameri- 
can Commonwealth. The experimental 
stage was over. The days to which dis- 
tance gives a touch of romance were ended. 
The memory of those still living holds 
almost all of that which was to follow. 



TWO SONNETS. 



BY BERT F. CASE. 



TO S. M. 
As one that, wandering in the frosty night 
On some lone quest beyond his little town, 
His searching vain, looks up with sudden 

fright 
As other worlds in still mystery look down 
And all his little toilsome path do drown 
In the wide splendor of their quenchless 

light- 
So in Life's narrowing path I hurried on 
In eager quest, with weary, strained sight, 
And found not what I sought, or only found 
Despair in seeking, till my startled Heart 
Turned and beheld the pure, eternal Love 
Of thy young life forever circling round 
With maiden prayers my path. I know 

thou art 
My Savior and my Saint thro One above. 

i8 9 3- 



II. 

MY DREAM. 

A dreaming child will sometimes start and 

cry 
"Papa, comeback — O Papa, don'tgo'way !" 
Because a floating cloud in Dreamland's sky 
Hath hidden a star or two, or driven away 
From his dear sight one little trembling ray 
Of sweetest light. But clouds float by — 
In Childhood's sky they but a moment 

stay — 
The dream runs gently on. — At midnight I 
Did dream that She, the One I loved, had 

died. 
Heartbroken cried I~"0,come back to me!" 
No word, no look. " O God in Heaven," I 

wept, 
" My prayer, my prayer, it must not be 

denied." 
The morning came, — My Dream, God pity 

me, 
My Dream was true ! Joy to his grave hath 

crept. 
i8qq. 



POEMS OX ROARING BROOK, CHESHIRE. 



ILLUSTRATED BY ELLSWORTH SPERRV. 



AX OUTLOOK. 



From the Summit of Roaring Brook. Cheshire. Conn. 



BY E. \V. ELLSWORTH. 



But turn, and on this mountain crest, 
A little Yale the rocks inclose. 

Of grass and flowers, a hidden nest 
Of quiet, and retired repose ; 

And through it slides a mountain stream 
The pines and maples close it round, 
And airs, of soft eolian sound. 

Come like the music of a dream. 



j\n 



KE we this mountain top our 
stand, 

Till noon is past, and shadows grow ; 
How wide the skies, above, expand. 

How deep the valley stoops below ! 
The heaven above us seems so near, 

That we would utter to the air 

A feeling near akin to prayer. 
And build a tabernacle here. 

These mountains, of an age unknown, 
Still in their solid strength abide. 

Like dial gnomons carved in stone, 
Whose hours by centuries divide : 

Those clouds, the children of the sun. 
To briefer life arise and soar, 
A thousand acres browning o'er, 

But passing quickly one by one. 

And level-off, so high in air, 

Wheels yonder hawk in dizzy round ; 
And through the forest, everywhere, 

Creeps up the wind with lulling sound. 
From yonder glen, of ruined rocks, 

Comes, swelling with a fitful call, 

The laughter of a waterfall, 
Which leaps among the fallen blocks 

Above us is the void of heaven, 

Save by the trooping clouds untrod : 

Before us. to our view is given 

A teeming valley's checkered sod : 

Beneath, a cliff all steep and stark, 
Save trees that topple from its face, 
Of thunder storms the battle place, 

And branded with the lightning's mark. 
553 



, 




554 



POEMS ON ROARING BROOK, CHESHIRE. 



O could a wish the heart engage, 
In such an hour and place as this, 

It were to build a hermitage 

Within this airy bower of bliss — 

From the rude world, beneath, to steal, 
And seek, with long devotion, here, 
Communion with the nobler sphere 

Which God, in nature, doth reveal. 



ROARING BROOK. 



BY J. R. PADDOCK. 



BORN mid living springs and' foun- 
tains, 
'Neath the fir trees on the mountains, 




It cannot be. The world we tread 

Unfolds, cathedral-like, its towers, 
Where walls memorialize the dead, 

And cloisters grow with living flowers — 
Where we, in hours of joy or pain, 

Should hush our thoughts to calm, and 
see 

Him who upbuilds eternity ; 
Then forth and to our work again. 



Bubbling, gushing, laughing, splashing, 

'Round the rocks and tree trunks dashing, 

Over precipices leaping, 

Foam and mist its path close keeping, 

Careless of what is to be, 

Reckless in its liberty. 

Listen ! how its voices call 
To the pine trees, slim and tall. 
Hear its roaring water-fall ! 



POEMS ON ROARING BROOK, CHESHIRE. 



555 



In the damp and dark 
ravine, 

Fringed above with 
evergreen ! 

Here a forest oak up- 
torn 

By the winds, in win- 
ter's storms, 

Checks its waywaid 
course, and forms 

Barriers, over which it 
rides 

In long, wild, tumult- 
uous tides. 

Now in whirling pools, 
swift gliding, 

Where the wary trout 
lies hiding, 

Now where fragrant 
tangled ferns 

Pendant hang from 
rocky urns, 

Then 'twixt velvet 
banks of moss, 

Glistening, shelving 
rocks across, 

Where the wild arbu- 
tus grows, 

Peeping first from win- 
ter's snows. 

Soon it leaves its rocky 

bed, 
Flows through mead- 
ows carpeted 
Emerald green, with flowers of gold, 
Buttercups and marigold. 
Here the willow branches sink 
To its waters very brink, 
And the cattle come to drink, 
Stand and cool their parched feet, 
In the days of summer heat. 

Turns the old mill's ponderous whee 
Turns the golden corn to meal, 
Turns its power to human weal, 
Turns the clouds its waters feel, 




In the long and silent night, 
Into diamonds, flashing bright. 
Tamed in spirit, once so free, 
Chastened by its industry. 

By the homesteads, by the barn?, 
By the orchards, thro the farms, 
Winding to the river deep ; 
On its bosom falls asleep. 
Mountain brook ! I dimly see 
Pictures of my life, in thee ; 
Childhood's happy endless play , 



556 



POEMS ON ROARING BROOK, CHESHIRE. 



Youth's fast fleeting holiday ; 
Manhood's toil and stern endeavor; 
Days where memory lives forever. 
May thy river swiftly run ; 
Find the ocean ; seek the sun ; 
On his stairs of mist ascend ; 
Winged clouds thy flight attend. 



A PASSAGE OF SCENERY 
IN CONNECTICUT. 



BY N. P. WILLIS. 



(Written in 1835.) 



IT was a mountain stream, that with 
the leap 
Of its impatient waters, had worn out 
A_channel in the rock, and washed away 
The earth that had upheld the tall old 

trees, 
Till it was darkened with the shadowy 

arch 
Of the o'er leaning branches. Here and 

there 
It loitered in a broad and limpid pool, 
That circled round demurely, and anon 



Sprung violently over, where the rock 
Fell suddenly, and bore its bubbles on 
Till they were broken by the hanging 

moss, 
As anger with a gentle word grows calm. 

In spring time, when the snows were 

coming down, 
And in the flooding of the autumn rains 
No foot might enter there — but in the 

hot and thirsty summer, when the 

fountains slept, 
You could go up its channel, in the shade 
To the far sources, with a brow as cool 
As in the grotto of the Anchorite. 
Here, when an idle student, have I come, 
And in a hollow of the rock, lain down, 
And mused, until the even tide, or read 
Some fine old poet, till my nook became 
A haunt of faery, or the busy flow 
Of water, to my spell bewildered ear, 
Seemed like the din of some tournament 

gay, 

Pleasant have been such hours and though 

the wise 
Have said, that I was indolent, and they 
Who taught me have reproved me, that I 

played 
The truant in the leafy month of June, 
I deem it true philosophy in him, 
Whose path is in the rude and busy world, 
To loiter with these wayside comforters. 



A CASE OF WITCHCRAFT IN HARTFORD. 



BY CHARLES J. HOADLY, LL. D. 



THE case of Rebecca Greensmith and 
her husband, now to be related, was 
considered by Increase Mather, taking 
into account the circumstances of her 
confession, to be as convictive a proof of 
the reality of witchcraft as most single 
examples he had met with. 

This author published at Boston in 
1684, a small book entitled An Essay for 
the Recording of Illustrious Providences, 
which is among the rarer of the Mather 
publications. It was reprinted in London 
in 1856, and is perhaps best known as 
Mather's Remarkable Providences. This 
book and a letter to the author, dated 
Dec. 4, 1682, by Rev. John Whiting, 
pastor of the Second Church in Hartford, 
have been drawn on for a considerable 
part of this narrative : the record and a 
single deposition being all the official 
papers connected with the trial which have 
come down to us. Cotton Mather pub- 
lished an abridged account of the case in 
the Magnalia. 

There are in every community those 
who for one cause or another unfortu- 
nately incur the dislike and suspicion oi 
the neighbors, and when belief in witch- 
craft prevailed such persons w T ere easily 
believed to have familiarity with the evil 
one. Nathaniel Greensmith and Rebecca 
his wife, Elizabeth wife of Richard Seager^ 
the wife of William Ayres, Andrew San- 
ford and Mary, his wife, were of this class. 
They all lived in Hartford in 166 1-2, and, 
as I think, south of the little river. Green- 
smith owned a house and barn w T ith some 
38 



twenty acres of land, valued at 46 pounds. 
He seems to have been engaged in agri- 
culture. In March, 1650, he was found 
by the court guilty of stealing a bushel 
and a half of wheat. In June of the same 
year he was convicted of stealing a hoe 
and lying in the face of the court ; in 
March,i65i-2,he was the unsuccessful de- 
fendant in an action of battery. He mar- 
ried Rebecca, widow of Jarvis Mudge, 
previously widow of Abraham Elson of 
Wethersfield, by whom she had two 
daughters who at the date of this tragedy 
were about 17 and 15 years old. She had 
no children by her second and third 
husbands. Rev. John Whiting speaks of 
her as " a lewd, ignorant and considerably 
aged woman." 

In the spring of 1662 the daughter of 
John KelJey, a child of 8 years, died after 
a short illness. In her delirium she cried 
out against goody Ayres as afflicting her. 
Her parents and sundry of the neighbors 
thought the child was bewitched to death. 
Thereupon sundry persons were examined 
by the magistrates ; some were committed 
to prison, while some managed to escape. 
Goody Ayres was arrested, and on some 
testimony being given in court said, "This 
will take away my life." However, by the 
aid of some friends she succeeded in 
escaping and with her husband fled with 
great precipitation. James Walkley was 
one who fled and took refuge in Rhode 
Island. Judith, daughter of Caspar 
Varleth, a dutchman, was imprisoned on 
" pretend accusation of witchery," as we 

557 



558 



A CASE OF WITCHCRAFT IN HARTFORD. 



learn from a letter in her behalf from her 
brother-in-law, Governor Peter Stuyvesant, 
dated Oct. 13, 1662. May 13, 1662, 
Nathaniel Goldsmith brought against 
William Ayres an action of slander re- 
specting his wife, which we may suppose 
had relation to charges of witchcraft, but 
it never came to trial, the plaintiff and his 
wife being soon arrested for alledged 
familiarity with satan, and the defendant 
out of the court's jurisdiction. On the 
13th of June, 1662, Mary, wife of Andrew 
Sanford, was indicted for having had 
familiarity with the great enemy of God 
and mankind and by his help having 
acted, and also come to the knowledge of 
secrets in a preternatural way beyond the 
ordinary course of nature, to the great 
disturbance of several members of this 
commonwealth. She was found guilty by 
the jury, but we do not know what became 
of her or whether her case had anything 
to do with the Greensmiths. We only 
know that she was a reputed witch. 

Ann Cole, daughter of John Cole, a 
godly man who lived next neighbor to the 
Greensmiths, had some time been afflicted 
and in some fears about her spiritual 
estate. In the year 1662, she was taken 
with strange fits, wherein she (or rather 
the devil as 'tis judged, making use of her 
lips) held a discourse for a considerable 
time. The general purport of it was to 
this purpose, that a company of familiars 
of the evil one (who were named in the 
discourse that passed from her) were 
conspiring how to carry on their mis- 
chievous designs against some, and es- 
pecially against her, mentioning sundry 
ways they would take to that end : as 
that they would afflict her body, spoil her 
name, hinder her marriage, etc., wherein 
the general answer made among them was, 
"She runs to her Rock. : ' This method 
having been continued some hours, the 
conclusion was, Let us confound her lan- 



guage that she may tell no more tales. And 
then, after some time of unintelligible 
muttering, the discourse passed into a 
Dutch tone (a family of Dutch .then living 
in the town), and therein an account was 
given of some afflictions that had befallen 
divers. Among the rest a young woman 
(next neighbor to that Dutch family) that 
could speak but very litde (laboring of 
that infirmity from her youth) had met 
with great sorrow, as pinchings of her 
arms in the dark, etc., whereof she had 
before informed her brother (one of the 
ministers in Hartford, probably Whiting.) 
In that Dutch toned discourse there were 
plain intimations given, by whom and for 
what cause such a course had been taken 
with her. Judicious Mr. Stone being by 
when the latter discourse passed, declared 
it in his thoughts impossible that one not 
familiarly acquainted with the Dutch 
(which Ann Cole had not at all been) 
should so exactly imitate the Dutch tone 
in the pronunciation of English. Sundry 
times such kind of discourse was uttered 
by her which was very awful and amazing 
to the hearers. Mr. Samuel Hooker,minis- 
ter of Farmington, was present the first 
time, and Mr. Joseph Haynes, a young 
man of about 21, then perhaps supplying 
the pulpit ofWethersfield, who wrote what 
was said ; so did Mr. Whiting, colleague 
with Mr. Stone in the Hartford church, 
(from whose letter I am quoting), when 
he came into the house some time after 
the discourse began. Extremely violent 
bodily motions she many times had, even 
to the hazard of her life in the apprehen- 
sions of those that saw them ; and very 
often great disturbance was given in the 
public worship of God by her and two 
other women who had also strange fits. 
Once in special, on a day of prayer kept 
on that account, the motion and noise of 
the afflicted was so terrible that a godly 
person fainted under the appearance of it. 



A CASE OF WITCHCRAFT IN HARTFORD. 



559 



There was a day of fasting and prayer 
on account of Ann Cole, and at which she 
was present, kept at the house of Mr. 
Wyllys, college class mate with Messrs. 
Hooker and Whiting, when Ann Cole 
cried out against Elizabeth Seager as a 
witch. Goody Seager hearing of it re- 
marked that Mr. Haynes had writ a great 
deal of hodge podge that Ann had said 
that she was under suspicion for a witch. 
We should agree with goody Seager in 
regard to the matter, but it was hardly 
safe then so to characterize Ann's hysteri- 
cal ravings. Seager was herself indicted 
for witchcraft Jan. 6, 1662-3 ; a second 
time, July 2, 1663 ; and a third time July 
16, 1665, when she was found guilty and 
after about a year's imprisonment she was 
released and found Rhode Island a more 
congenial place of residence. 

To return to goody Greensmith, who 
was then in prison on suspicion of witch- 
craft. The court sent for Mr. Haynes 
and Mr. Whiting, to read what they had 
written ; which when Mr. Haynes had 
done (the prisoner being present) she 
forthwith and freely confessed those things 
to be true, that she (and other persons 
named in the discourse) had familiarity 
with the devil. Being asked whether she 
had made an express covenant with him, 
she answered she had not, only as she 
promised to go with him when he called 
(which she had accordingly done several 
times). But that the devil told her that 
at Christmas they would have a merry 
meeting, and then the covenant should 
be drawn and subscribed. Thereupon the 
fore-mentioned Mr. Stone (being then in 
court) with much weight and earnestness 
laid forth the exceeding heinousness and 
hazard of that dreadful sin ; and therewith 
solemnly took notice (upon the occasion 
given) of the devil's loving Christmas. 

A person at the same time present 
being desired the next day more particu- 



larly to enquire of her about her guilt, it 
was accordingly done, to whom she ac- 
knowledged that though when Mr. Haynes 
began to read she could have torn him in 
pieces, and was so much resolved as 
might be to deny her guilt ( as she had 
done before) yet after he had read awhile, 
she was as if her flesh had been pulled 
from her bones, (such was her expres- 
sion,) and so could not deny any longer. 
She also declared that the devil first 
appeared to her in the form of a deer or 
fawn, skipping about her, wherewith she 
was not much affrighted, but by degrees 
he contrived talk with her ; and that their 
meetings were frequently at such a place, 
(near her own house;) that some of the 
company came in one shape and some in 
another, and one in particular in the 
shape of a crow came flying to them. 
Amongst other things she owned that the 
devil had frequent use of her body. 

At a particular court held at Hartford? 
December 30, 1662, the following 
indictment of Nathaniel Greensmith and 
of Rebecca, his wife, was found : 

" Nathaniel Greensmith thou art here 
indicted by the name of Nathaniel 
Greensmith for not having the fear of 
God before thine eyes, thou hast enter- 
tained familiarity with Satan, the grand 
enemy of God and mankind, and by his 
help hast acted things in a preternatural 
way beyond human abilities in a natural 
course, for which according to the law of 
God and the established law of this com- 
monwealth thou deservest to die." 

The magistrates holding the court were 
Matthew Allyn, moderator, Samuel Wyllys, 
Richard Treat, Henry Wolcott, Daniel 
Clark, secretary, John Allyn. The jury 
were Edward Griswold, Walter Filer, En- 
sign Olmsted, Samuel Boardman, Gregory 
Winterton, John Cowles, Samuel Marshall, 
Samuel Hale, Nathaniel Willett, John Hart, 
John Wadsworth and Robert Webster. 



560 



A CASE OF WITCHCRAFT IN HARTFORD. 



Nathaniel Greensmith made no confes- 
sion. Here is all that we know of the 
evidence given in against him : 

Rebecca Greensmith testifieth in court 
January 8, 1662. 

" 1. 'That my husband on Friday night 
last, when I came to prison, told me that 
now thou hast confest against thyself let 
me alone and say nothing of me and I 
will be good unto thy children. 

"2. '1 do now testify that formerly 
when my husband hath told me of his 
great travail and labor, I wondered at it 
how he did it ; this he did before I was 
married, and when I was married I asked 
him how he did it, and he answered me, 
he had help that I knew not of. 

"3. 'About three years ago, as I think 
it, my husband and I were in the woods 
several miles from home, and were look- 
ing for a sow that we lost, and I saw a 
creature, a red creature, following my 
husband, and when I came to him I 
asked him what it was that was with him, 
and he told me it was a fox. 

"4. 'Another time when he and I 
drove our hogs into the woods beyond 
the pound that was to keep young cattle, 
several miles off, I went before the hogs 
to call them, and looking back I saw two 
creatures like dogs, one a little blacker 
than the other j they came after my hus- 
band pretty close to him, and one did 
seem to me to touch him. I asked him 
what they were, he told me he thought 
foxes. I was still afraid when I saw 
anything, because I heard so much of 
him before I married him. 

"5. 'I have seen logs that my husband 
hath brought home in his cart that I 
wondered at it that he could get them 
into the cart, being a man of little body 
and weak to my apprehension ; and the 
logs were such that I thought two men 
such as he could not have done it. 



" ' I speak all of this out of love to my 
husband's soul, and it is much against my 
will that I am now necessitate to speak 
against my husband. I desire that the 
Lord would open his heart to own and 
speak the truth. 

" ' I also testify, that I being in the woods 
at a meeting, there was with me goody 
Seager, goodwife Sanford and goodwife 
Ayres. And at another time there was a 
meeting under a tree in the green by our 
house, and there was there James Walk- 
ley, Peter Grant's wife, goodwife Ayres, 
and Henry Palmer's wife, of Wethersfield, 
and goody Seager ; and there we danced 
and had a bottle of sack. It was in the 
night and something like a cat called me 
out to the meeting, and I was in Mr. Var- 
let's orchard with Mrs. Judith Varlet, and 
she told me that she was much troubled 
with the marshal, Jonathan Gilbert, and 
cried ; and she said if it lay in her power 
she would do him a mischief, or what 
hurt she could. Taken upon oath in 
court.' 

"The jury return that they find the 
prisoner at the bar, Nathaniel Green- 
smith, guilty of the indictment. 

" Respecting Rebecca Greensmith, the 
prisoner at the bar, the jury find her 
guilty of the indictment. 

" The said Rebecca confesseth in open 
court, that she is guilty of the charge laid 
in against her." 

This, with the concurrent evidence, 
brought the woman and her husband to 
their death as the devil's familiars. 

On the 6th of January, 1662-3, Mary 
Barnes, of Farrnington, was indicted for 
witchcraft and found guilty by the jury. 
It is quite likely that she was put to 
death ; but we know nothing of her evil 
deeds, nor is her name mentioned in any 
of the depositions of evidence which 
have come to our hands. 



A CASE OF WITCHCRAFT IN HARTFORD. 



561 



The diary of GorTe, the regicide judge, 
as quoted in Hutchinson's History of 
Massachusetts Bay, says under date of 
January 20, 1662 (3) "Three witches 
were condemned at Hartford." — Feb- 
ruary 24. "After one of the witches 
was hanged the maid was well." These 
dates must be understood as those of the 
entry by the diarist, and not of the events 
recorded. GofTe was at this time living in 
concealment at Milford. In the office 
of the court of probate in this city may 
be seen " An inventory of the estate of 
Nathaniel Greensmith, who was executed 
the 25th of January, 1662 (3.)" It was 
filed but not recorded, and is in the 
handwriting of William Pitkin. The 
amount of the inventory was 137 pounds, 
fourteen shillings, one penny, besides 
forty-four pounds, four shillings, tour 
pence, claimed by Hannah and Sarah 
Elson. On February 11, 1662-3, tne 
magistrates took order as to the estate 
and the disposition of the two daughters ; 
and at the quarter court held at Hartford, 
March 5 th following, allowance was made 
to Daniel Garret, the jail keeper, of six 
shillings a week for keeping Nathaniel 
Greensmith and his wife, besides their 
fees, which is to be paid out of Green- 
smith's estate, and for keeping goodwife 
Barnes three weeks, twenty-one shillings, 
besides her fees, which goodman Barnes 
is to see discharged. 

After the suspected witches were either 
executed or fled, Ann Cole was restored to 



health. She joined the church, married 
Andrew Benton of Hartford, by whom 
she had children, and was living in good 
repute when Mather published his book 
in 1684. Andrew Benton, aged 63, died 
July 31, 1683. His gravestone is still 
standing in the old cemetery at Hartford. 
Ann (Cole) his second wife, died in 1686 
according to Savage. 

Mather tells a story about a man and 
woman mentioned in Ann Cole's Dutch 
toned discourse, (who I think were Wil- 
liam Ayres and his wife,) who were put 
into the water bound hand and foot, to 
try whether they were witches or not. 
They floated, and doubting that a halter 
would choke them though the waters 
would not, they took their flight and were 
not seen in that part of the world after- 
wards. Mather condemns this mode of 
probation as superstitious and unlawful. 

Mather also tells a story about a 
brother of Ann who was struck dead by 
lightning while at a prayer meeting at 
the home of his father-in-law, Henry 
CondlifT at Northampton, April 28, 
1664. He says he was informed, that 
when Matthew Cole was killed by lighten- 
ing, the demons which disturbed his 
sister Ann (forty miles distant) in Hart- 
ford, spoke of it, intimating their con- 
currence in that terrible accident. Savage 
gives the date as April 28, 1665. As 
Ann was delivered from her trouble in 
1663, there seems to be a discrepancy in 
the dates. 



M 


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:, M m 


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EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF DR. MASON 
FITCH COGSWELL. 



COMPILED FROM ANNOTATIONS OF REV. DR. LEONARD BACON. 



BY KLLEN STRONG BARTLKTT. 



PART II. 



Continued from October Number, 
££HPHE bell referred to was the nine 
1 o'clock bell, the old New Eng- 
land curfew, after which it was hardly 
good manners to prolong an evening call. 
"Under date of 'Thursday, 20th,' the 
diarist records that, after breakfasting at 
his lodgings, he i sat half an hour under 
the hands of the frisieur before going out 
to deliver his letters.' He seems to have 
been a stranger in Hartford and desirous 
of making a favorable impression. So we 
see him with his head nicely powdered 
and his queue newly tied in a black rib- 
bon, walking along Main Street, for in 
those days few Hartford people of mark 
and fashion lived on any other street. He 
'called on Mr. Strong and was much 
disappointed in not seeing Mrs. Strong.' 
' My feelings,' he adds, ' were prepared 
to meet an old friend, and to have them 
so suddenly checked by the information 
that she was so indisposed as to render 
her recovery doubtful was painful.' In 
November, 1788, Nathan Strong, (after- 
ward Dr. Strong) had been for nearly 
fifteen years pastor of the First Church in 
Hartford, and was already one of the first 
men in Connecticut — the peer of Dr. 
Dwight, as he had been his college class- 
mate. His ministry of forty-one years 
562 



was terminated by his death, Dec. 25, 
1 818. I well remember the sensation 
which his death produced and how that 
sensation was renewed and deepened by the 
death of President Dwight a few days 
later. Mrs. Strong was Anna McCurdy 
of Lyme. She had been married less 
than two years, and her life (as the diary 
intimates) was then coming to its close. 

" Mr. Strong's house was the next door 
to Col. Wadsworth's, and there it seems 
our traveler had been invited to dine. I 
will venture to transcribe the record. ' We 
were soon seated at the table ; our com- 
pany consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Wadsworth, 
Miss St. John, Misses Harriet and Caty, 
Messrs. D. Wadsworth, Samuel Broome, 
and myself. We were all cheerful ; how 
could we be otherwise when the heads of 
the table were peculiarly so — her counte- 
nance as placid as a summer eve, and his 
full of benignity, equally expressive of the 
goodness of his heart and the greatness of 
his soul. After dinner, the ladies retired 
to dress for a visit to Miss Bull, except 
Miss St. John, who was indisposed with a 

toothache. W , B — — , and myself? 

amused ourselves in the parlor with music 
until tea-time, when we followed the 
ladies. I was pleased with Miss Bull 
yesterday, but more so to-day. I trow she 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



563 



is a good girl. Immediately after tea we 
returned to Colonel Wadsworth's and 
spent the evening in a manner that was to 
me delightfully instructive. A circle of 
only five, we did not wish it enlarged. 
Not a single individual interrupted our 
converse until ten o'clock. Our subjects 
of conversation were various ; we ran 
counter to all the rules of modern polite- 
ness ; we did not, to my recollection, say 
a word about fashions or plays and such 
like matters, nor did we scandalize a 
single character through the whole course 
of the evening, but we acted in direct 
agreement with our feelings.' 

"After describing, in a somewhat effusive 
way, the course and character of their talk, 
the writer portrays the interlocutors in the 
dialogue. ' Harriet has read a good deal 
and has reflected a good deal on what 
she has read. Hence she has many 
observations of her own, not eccentric, 
but pleasingly original. She has one of 
the happiest tempers in the world, and 
delights in making those happy who are 
around her. She speaks highly of many 
and ill of none. Add to these a happy 
talent of adapting her conversation to the 
company she is in, and it is not strange 
that she should be thought an agreeable 
girl. Although she is not a beauty, yet 
her countenance is beautifully expressive.' 

" We will pause a moment before this 
pen-portrait. 

"Among the Trumbull pictures in the 
Yale School of the Fine Arts, there are 
five miniatures of ladies in one frame, No. 
22. The date is 1791, three years later 
than the date of this journal. The first of 
the five is Harriet Wadsworth, and the 
painter has made ' her countenance,' I 
will not say an ideal beauty, but beautiful 
as well as ' beautifully expressive.' Per- 
haps affection added something of poetry 
to the likeness, for the family tradition is 
that the painter was her lover. 



"A monument in the parish church-yard 
of St. George, on the Island of Bermuda, 
bears this inscription : 

To The 
MEMORY 

of 

HARRIET WADSWORTH 

of Hartford, Con., U. S. A. 

Who died in this Island, 

Of a Consumption, 

April 10, 1793, 

Aged 24 

Years. 

" In that lively and happy company at 
Col. Wadsworth's, Thursday evening, 
November 20, 1788, there was no thought 
of such a record to be made so soon. 

" We return to our admiring friend's 
pen-portraits of the company. ' Caty is 
her younger sister, with a face as indica- 
tive of a good heart as a lamb's is of its 
meekness. She seems to possess all the 
virtues of her sister, but they are of a 
younger growth. 

' She wants a little of that grace which 
enables Harriet to do everything to 
advantage; and a few more years will 
probably add to the list of her agreeables.' 

"Here we pause again: — Catherine 
Wadsworth was at that time not quite 
fifteen years old. Her miniature is one of 
the five which I have mentioned, being 
directly under her sisters ; and it shows 
that when she was in her eighteenth year, 
her face, still indicative of a good heart 
was in the full bloom of beauty ; and on 
the wall of an apartment in my house is a 
portrait (copied from the original by 
Sully) which shows what she was when ' a 
few more years,' without effacing the 
glow of maiden beauty, had blended with 
it the charm of matronly dignity and 
grace. 

" I proceed with our friend's record of 
his impressions : — 'As for Daniel, he is a 






%if| 





\ 



4^m- ir 



FROM Oil, MINIATURES, PAINTED BY JOHN TRUMBUEL, NOW IN THE TRUMBUI.lv 
GA^ERY, YAEE ART SCHOOE, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Harriet Wadsworth. 

Daughter of 

Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth. 



Faith Trumbull. 
Daughter of Jonathan Trumbull and 
wife of Daniel Wadsworth. 



Mrs. Jonathan Trumbull. 



Catherine Wadsworth. 

Daughter of Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth 

and wife of General Nathaniel Terry. 

564 



Mart Julia Seymour. 

Daughter of Thomas Seymour, the first 

Mayor of Hartford. 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



565 



strange youth. With his pockets full of 
fnoney, he had rather, at any time, sit 
down at home betwixt his two sisters and 
by some new act of tenderness call forth 
their affection toward him, than to be in 
the best and most fashionable company 
(best and fashionable underscored as 
'wrote sarkastic') at the gaming table, 
or in any place where he can spend his 
money in an honorable and polite way. 
(Honorable and polite again ' wrote sar- 
kastic'). Tis true as it is strange; and 
furthermore he is warmly attached to the 
principles of virtue and morality, and 
really he is not ashamed of his God.' 

" This ' strange youth ' was so eccentric 
through a long life, and his family affec- 
tions though he was childless, were so 
strong that in his old age he took the 
lead in building upon the site of what had 
been his father's and grandfather's home, 
the Wadsworth Atheneum, devoted to 
public uses, one part of it to the Con- 
necticut Historical Society, another part 
to the Hartford Young Men's Institute, 
and another part to a Gallery of Paintings. 
It is his filial tribute to the memory of his 
ancestors, who were identified with Hart- 
ford from its beginning and designed as 
their monument. It is his also. I think 
I may say of the many who have inherited 
or are to inherit the remainder of his wealth 
there is not one who regrets that princely 
gift to Hartford or is not proud of it. 
Nor can I refuse to say of that ' strange 
youth ' who loved his home so well, that 
the tender affection for his sisters which 
is portrayed in what I have just been 
telling, lived in him to the last. Though 
he survived for more than fifty years that 
elder sister whose decay and death he 
watched in lone Bermuda, he never seemed 
to lose the freshness of his grief. 

" Having interpolated so much about 
the Wadsworth family, I will add before 
returning to our friend's description of 



that evening's pleasure, that Colonel 
Wadsworth, having served as Representa- 
tive in Congress for three successive terms, 
from the organization of the government 
in 1789, died in 1804 of premature decay 
the result of hardships and exposures in 
the war for independence. Madame 
Wadsworth lived to extreme old age 
and died in 181 7. I saw her buried by 
the side of her husband, her grave being 
the last save one (or possibly two), that 
was made in the old burial-ground behind 
the Center Church. As I stood there 
among the spectators that had been drawn 
together by the unwonted sight of a burial 
in that old place, I little thought that 
children of mine would trace their descent 
through her from James Pierpont and 
Thomas Hooker. 

" Returning now from this digression, 
and resuming our friend's description of 
the pleasant company that evening at 
Col. Wadsworth's, we are reminded that 
New Haven had a representative there in 
the person of 'Sam'l Broome.' Him 
the writer describes as 'a lad of good 
sense but rather trifling at times,' and 
then says, ' he possesses a talent at pun- 
ning, and by occasionally throwing in a 
remark he prevented us from becoming 
too seriously sentimental.' So we may 
congratulate ourselves that New Haven 
did really, though indirectly, contribute 
something towards completing and round- 
ing out the enjoyment of the occasion. 
Even a trifler and a punster may some- 
times be of use when the conversation is 
growing thoughtful and is in danger of 
becoming too serious or too 'sentimental.' 

"At a reasonable hour our friend re- 
paired to his lodgings, but he did not re- 
sign himself to sleep till he had read from 
"Elegant Extracts," (a volume which I 
remember, though it is obsolete now) 
several pathetic and descriptive pieces 
which the ladies had commended to his 



566 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



notice, and on which his critical judgment 
coincided with theirs. 

"The next morning, ' Friday, 21st,' we 
find him immediately after breakfast 
mounting his 'Rosinante' and 'setting his 
face westward ' with letters and whatever 
else he had 'for the name of Talcott.' He 
went out to the Talcott ' family mansion 
on the hill,' beyond where the American 
Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb now is. 
Approaching the house he was met by a 
' venerable old gentleman,' to whom he 
introduced himself as bringing ' letters 
from New York,' which, by the way, is the 
first intimation we have had of where he 
came from. The 'family mansion' was 
at that time held by a son of Gov. Tal- 
cott, Chief Magistrate of His Majesty's 
Colony of Connecticut from 1724 to his 
death in 1741, a period of seventeen 
years. A sister of his was the mother of 
Col. Wadsworth. Austin Talcott, Attor- 
ney General of the state of New York, 
one of the most brilliant names in the 
legal profession of that great state was 
his grandson. In the conversation which 
ensues after our traveler has entered the 
house and in which there is a hardly per- 
ceptible flavor of the medical profession, 
it comes out that his name is Cogswell 
and at last we know beyond a peradventure 
who he is. 

" Mason Fitch Cogswell was a graduate 
of Yale College in the class of 1780, and 
was honored as the foremost in that class. 
The war for independence was then in 
progress, and he immediately began the 
study and I may say the practice of med- 
icine and surgery under an elder brother, 
who was a surgeon in the army. He was 
stationed for a time in Stamford, where 
his brother had married into the Daven- 
port family, and where he was at home in 
families of the highest position and cul- 
ture. After the war, he resided, I know 
not how long, in New York ; and he seems 



now to be making a journey from New 
York to keep Thanksgiving at his father's 
house. 

" His father was the Rev. James Cogs- 
well, who had been from 1744 to 1771 
the pastor of the church in Canterbury, 
but for the last six years had been pastor 
in Scotland, a parish of Windham. His 
mother was Alice Fitch, of the great 
Fitch family in eastern Connecticut, and 
her mother was a descendant from the 
famous hero of the Pequot War, John 
Mason. Thus it came to pass that his 
name was Mason Fitch Cogswell. At the 
date of this journal he was apparently 
making his first acquaintance with Hart- 
ford and in that day's ride to the Talcott 
mansion, he had passed — unconscious of 
the future — the site now occupied by a 
great institution which had its origin from 
the calamity of the daughter to whom he 
gave his mother's name, Alice Cogswell. 

"Having accompanied him thus leisure- 
ly from Stamford to Hartford, we must 
hasten through the remainder of his 
journey. The next day, 'Saturday, 22nd,' 
he was ferried across the Connecticut at 
an early hour and arrived at his father's 
house in the evening. 

" ' The tear of pleasure glittered ' in that 
father's eye as he embraced his son. For 
'Sunday 21st,' the record opens, 'At- 
tended divine service and was delighted 
both with the preaching and the music. 
My feelings before I entered the house, 
were attuned to harmony and the music 
which was uncommonly good, striking 
upon the already vibrating cords, pre- 
pared me in the best possible manner for 
the ensuing discourse from ' My son, keep 
thyself pure.' The filial hearer (evidently) 
confounded with the text the application 
of it which he made to himself and which 
he knew was in his father's thoughts. The 
text was from I. Tim. vi., 22: 'Keep 
thyself pure,' said the apostle to the 






DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



567 



young preacher, but he did not in that 
connection say 'My son.' 

k ' Monday was a stormy day ; and our 
traveler was all day at home. Tuesday 
he visited some old friends. Wednesday 
was stormy again and cold ; and he spent 
most of the day with his father who was 
indisposed. But ' in the evening as a 
prelude to Thanksgiving' — so the journal 
tells us, — ' I went up and drank a mug of 
flip with Esq. Devotion and ate pompion 
pie with his wife, ' Then as he writes, he 
adds the explanation, ' How cold it grows ! 
I am too dull to write in my journal — Per- 
haps the flip has run round my intellects, 
or, what is worse, the pompion pie.' 

" I will abbreviate, as much as I can, his 
partly humorous record of Thanksgiving 
day, 'Thursday 27th.' The duties of the 
day had been to him such as he had never 
encountered before. His father, being 
too ill to officiate in the Thanksgiving 
service, devolved on him the duty of 
reading to the congregation an appropriate 
discourse or as he called it, 'preaching.' 
His desire to please a ' beloved parent ' 
overcame his diffidence ; and at the ap- 
pointed hour, with the psalm book in his 
pocket and his printed or written sermon 
in his hand, he presented himself at 
church and told the elders what their 
pastor has commissioned him to do. His 
offer was thankfully acknowledged and he 
seated himself in the minister's pew. But 
' a venerable sage ' got up and led him 
into the deacon's seat. He was invited to 
go up higher, but the thought, ' Humble 
thyself and thou shall be exalted ' kept 
him out of the too lofty pulpit. 

" He perceived that nothing would be 
done without him and being ' requested to 
proceed ' he ' pulled out his psalm book,' 
and his hand trembled but very little. 
'Let us sing' said he, 'the 97th Psalm,' 
and he read it with a very audible voice. 
The music was fine ; it entirely dissipated 



his timidities and as soon as it ceased, he 
arose and if he had had one on, he would 
probably have stroked his band ; but as 
he had none, he wiped his face with his 
pocket handkerchief, named his text 
and went on. Some people would have 
called it reading ; but really, he acted the 
preacher to admiration, as he was after- 
wards told by numbers of the congregation. 
The exercises were closed with an anthem 
from Isaiah, ' Sing, O ye heavens, etc.,' 
which was most enchantingly sung. 'After 
church, he repaired to his friend Devo- 
tion's and was treated with quite as much 
respect and attention as he desired. He 
drank flip, ate turkeys, pigs, pompion pies, 
apple pies, tarts, etc., etc., until he was 
perfectly satisfied. After supper he went 
home, gave thanks with his father, smoked 
a pipe for company's sake, bade the old 
folks good night, went into the kitchen, 
sung a number of songs to Polly and 
Betsey (his sisters), ate apples and nuts 
with them, and went to bed well satisfied 
with the transactions of the day.' 

'Tt occurs to me that among the hearers 
in the Scotland meeting-house that day, 
there must have been a certain bashful 
and studious boy, ten years old, with a 
marvelous appetite for knowledge and with 
a keen and quiet observation of men and 
things who had already — two years earlier, 
picked up Latin enough to understand the 
Triennial Catalogue of Yale, and whose 
parents had been advised by Parson 
Cogswell (though they needed no persua- 
sion) to give him a liberal education. 
That boy was James L. Kingsley ; and it 
startles me to remember that in 1852 the 
venerable Professor Kingsley passed away 
from this living and dying world. 

"On 'Friday 28th,' our friend rides to 
Windham — dines at Maj. Backus's, where 
he finds ' pompion pies again in abun- 
dance ' — then sets out for Lebanon in 
search of a friend whom he has already 



568 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



mentioned more than once under the 
apparently fictitious name of ' Orlands,' 
but whom I cannot identify. He finds 
him — just where he wished to find him — 
at Mr. Porter's. There he had a delight- 
ful evening with Emily and Sophy, the 
daughters of Mr. Porter, and charming 
sister of ' Orlands,' named Eliza. That 
Mr. Porter had been Gov. Trumbull's 
confidential secretary through. all the war 
and therefore we are not surprised to find 
our friend saying, ' Miss Trumbull made 
us happy an hour or so with her com- 
pany. Her person is elegant, though 
small ; here countenance agreeably ex- 
pressive and what is generally called hand- 
some. Her first appearance is much in 
her favor. I will wait till I see her again 
before I say anything more about her.' 

" Miss Trumbull was grand-daughter of 
the old war governor who had died three 
years before, and daughter of the second 
Jonathan who became governor ten years 
later. 

"The next day, 'Saturday 29th,' was 
one of those wet autumn days that intro- 
duce winter. But our friend says, ' We 
walked, or rather, waded over to Col. 
Trumbull's and sat and chatted an hour 
with him ; Mrs. Trumbull and Faithy all 
agreeable, the former peculiarly so — and 
the appearance of the latter, tho' reserved, 
such as inspires you with a desire of 
becoming intimately acquainted.' The 
miniatures of these two ladies are in the 
same group of five with the two daughters 
of Col. Wadsworth, Mrs. Trumbull in the 
center, Miss Faith Trumbull, (afterwards 
Mrs. Daniel Wadsworth) in the right hand 
upper corner. 

"There is a great deal of history con- 
nected with old Lebanon — so much that 
I dare not begin to touch upon it. Our 
traveler was hindered by the rain from 
proceeding to Norwich that day, as he 
had intended, but at an early hour the 



next morning, (Sunday, Nov. 30th,) he 
made the short ride. 'About half-past 
eight,' he says, 1 1 arrived at Governor 
Huntington's, my former home, and the 
manner in which I was welcomed made it 
as much so as ever. Had I been an own 
brother, Mrs. Huntington could not have 
treated me with more tenderness and 
affection, and I never before saw the 
Governor so social and conversable.' 

" Here are allusions which become in- 
telligible when we learn that Rev. James 
Cogswell's wife, Alice Fitch, died in 1772, 
soon after his settlement in Scotland — 
that in 1773 he married the widow of his 
predecessor, Mr. Devotion, when Mason 
Fitch Cogswell was twelve years old and 
that the boy was afterwards placed in the 
family of Mr. Huntington, at Norwich, 
where he was fitted for college. Samuel 
Huntington, whose name is subscribed to 
the Declaration of Independence, was 
born in that parish of Scotland. Like 
another subscriber to that Declaration, 
Roger Sherman, he made himself a great 
lawyer. In his youth he won the heart 
and hand of the Parson's comely daughter, 
Martha Devotion. So when Mrs. Hunt- 
ington's mother had become the wife of 
Mason F. Cogswell's father, they were in 
some figurative and step-sense an elder 
sister and a younger brother. 

"Our traveler's ten miles ride that Sun 
day morning was not regarded as a 
excuse for absence from public worship. 
He ' attended divine service both A. M. 
and P. M., and heard two metaphysical 
discourses from Mr. King, and on the 
whole was well pleased with them — 
thought, however, he was a little out of 
his latitude.' 

"(Rev. Walter King was pastor of the 
Second Church in Norwich (at the Land- 
ing) from 1787 to 1811. He was con- 
temporary in college with Dr. Mason F. 
Cogswell, though in a later class, 1782.) 



: 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



,69 



"Id the evening, the Sabbath having 
ended at sunset, our friend made a call at 
Mr. Woodbridge's, where Clara and Han- 
nah were as glad to see him as he was to 
see them, and ' paid more attention to ' 
him ' than to all the other gentlemen in 
the room.' But, in recording the fact, he 
checks the temptation 'to vanity by the 
consideration, ' they see me once in three 
years, and them they see every day.' 
Returning to his lodgings at the decorous 
hour of nine, he had time to • converse 
an hour with the Governor and his lady ' 
before retiring to rest. He remained in 
Norwich four days longer, visiting old 
friends with great enjoyment. On Mon- 
day he records that though it was a dull 
and disagreeable day, 'twas sunshine in 
the house.' 

" ' Refused several invitations to dine 
out, that I might eat turkey with the Gov- 
ernor. Thanksgiving not gone yet, for we 
had flip and pompion pies both. Drank 
several glasses of port, and was much 
pleased with several *musical anecdotes 
from the Governor.' 

"After visiting several old friends with 
much pleasure and drinking tea with 
1 Clara and Hannah,' he returned 'about 
eight and the last of the evening was equal 
to the first, Sammy and Fanny.' so runs 
the record, ' have improved exceedingly 
since I last saw them, both in mind and 
manners." He was not aware that Sammy. 
of whom, a college graduate of three years 



standing, he made mention so familiarly, 
was to be, no: many years later, Chief 
Justice and then Governor of Ohio — a 
state which in that year, 1788, fad nc 
existence even as a territory under terri- 
torial government, in which the earliest 
permanent settlement had just been made 
by a pioneer emigration from New England 
and which in 1S02 was received into the 
Union, the first-born of the Ordinance of 
1787. 

"The convention about which our friend 
had a chat with the Governor was doubt- 
less that which in the January preceding 
had given the ratification of Connecticut 
to the Constitution of the United States. 
Of that convention, Gov. Huntington was 
a conspicuous member; and this reminds 
us that when the genial diarist sat there 
chatting and smoking the calumet with the 
Governor, the government of the United 
States had not come into being. Eleven 
of the thirteen states had adopted the 
Constitution : electors of President were 
to be chosen in those eleven states on the 
first Wednesday in January ; the electors 
were to meet in their several colleges on 
the first Wednesday in February ; and on 
the 4th of March the First Congress was 
to meet in New York. In fact, fcr want 
of a quorum in the two houses, the organ- 
ization of the national government was 
not completed until April $o, 1789." 
To be Concluded in next number. 



* Note. The word " Musical " here was evidently used to mean amusing. 




MILFORD 

1689-1900. 



BY M. LOUISE GREENE. 



Illustrations by E. B. Hyatt. 




DOORWAY, STEPHEN 
GUNN HOUSE. 



ROM her town-hall, ra- 
diates, so to speak, 
the physical and 
non-physical aspects 
of Milford life. 
Approximately the 
"center" of the town, 
it is its heart. From 
out its school- rooms 
rush the children, 
who later will be 
chosen as of old, to 
sit at court or council held within its lower 
walls ; whose deliberations will make the 
future's weal or woe, progress or back- 
sliding, as the towns-people move down 
the twentieth century. And to this heart, 
when life has ceased, returns the final 
record. In the concise memoranda of 
birth, marriage, life and death here gath- 
ered, the historian of the future, as of the 
past, will find the outlines of that history 
to which his pen must give local and vital 
color. Happily at the opening of the cen- 
tury, men have more leisure and more 
ready means with which to piece out the 
dry facts of the municipal record than in 
the days of all script, or all hand-work 
at the printing-press. More fortunately 
still, landmarks of the early colonial days 
remain. 



Into the town-hall one can imagine suc- 
cessive streams of people flowing, or one 
can go forth from its broad veranda, not- 
ing the present and searching the past. 

Pausing on the steps, one may be re- 
minded that to the right across West River 
Street lies lot No. 15 of the original town- 
plat. This allotment of a little more than 
two acres, first given to Micah Tompkins 
who died in 1649 has held two historic 
dwellings. In reverse order, the home of 
Gov. Law* and the Tompkins house, in 
the cellar of which the regicides, Gofle 
and Whalley, lived concealed from 1661- 
1663. It is said the judges were often 
amused by a loyal little maid who sang 
while she worked, quite unconscious that 
below her were the wicked men her song 
described. In the old cemetery is a long 
line of Fenn gravestones, curiously orna- 
mented ones, with more than one Benja- 
min among them. But the first of the 
name, who well knew the secret of the 
small dark cellar lies not among them- 
He was buried just across the river on the 
hill that skirts its bank. He it was who, 
when summoned as one of the two dele- 
gates from the New Haven Colony to the 
meeting of the Commissioners of the 
United Colonies, shrewdly stipulated that 
"in case any business from without should 



^Illustration in September number. 
57o 



MILFORD. 



57i 



present, he conceived that he should give 
no offence if he did not attend," and by 
so doing avoided signing the document 
recommending to each colony a thorough 
search for the fugitives. 

Take any American town large or small 
and speaking broadly its town-hall will 
stand for politics and education, its 
churches for its religious and social life, 
and its post-office for its commercial and 



fall at either dam. If we stroll along to 
the watering-trough and up the hill, at the 
left by the old Higby house, built in 1789, 
Cherry street starts for New Haven, 
North street runs off to Derby, while right- 
about-face is the post-office block, and 
beyond the railroad-bridge another thor- 
oughfare is seen. One passes St. Peter's 
parish-house with its keys ; the church, in 
the Middle English pointed style, with 




THK TOWN HAU,. 



outside prestige. A measure of its gene- 
ral wakefulness can be detected in the 
outward appearance of these buildings. 
In Milford, as we sally forth from our 
vantage point the prosperous looking, 
trimly kept churches of the early faith lie 
behind us on the rising knoll*, before us 
stretch the pleasant thoroughfares of East 
and West River Street. The river purls 
its way beneath the firm substantial 
bridges, laughing as it dances down the 



graceful spire, one hundred feet high,sug- 
gesting Stoke Pogis or others of the type ; 
and also the home-like rectory. If one 
wishes the picturesque English setting of 
the church, one wanders round across 
the river, recalling its old name of St. 
Georges, when in 17 71 loyal colonists of 
the established English church, to the 
number of twenty families raised the 
earlier wooden building and in March, 
1775, consecrated it to their patron saint. 



^Illustrated in March number. 



572 



MILFORD. 



During the ten years preceding* they had 
gathered for occasional services, held by 
missionaries sent out by the Bishop of 




THE REGICIDE HOUSE. 

London as head of the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel. The nearest 
located missionary was at Redding. Of 
course, like all other non -Congregational 
churches, the infant parish had its troubles 
by tithes and legal annoyances and from 
New England antagonism to its faith. It 
had, too, the reproach of Toryism — com- 
mon to its creed. Dr. Kneeland and Dr. 
Johnson officiated a year or two. Not 
until 1786 was there a settled rector, the 
Rev. Henry Van Dike, 
at a salary of ^90 per 
year. The society was 
poor but tenacious of 
life. If they secured 
able men, like the 
above, a richer church 
would call them away. 
The people clung to- 
gether. They repaired 
the church by the com- 
mon method of the age 
— a lottery. They held 
together through the 
years of intermittent 



preaching, through the two during 
which they were served with the Strat- 
ford church and until T843, when the 
five years of Rev. Ferdinand E. White's 
rectorship gave them courage and fresh 
energy. Under Dr. James Dixon Carder, 
who remained with them from 1848 to 
1 86 1 great progress was made. Through 
the efforts of the rector and of Judge J. W. 
Fowler, who volunteered to give one-third 
the cost of a stone-church, the present 
edifice was erected in 1850 at a cost of 
$7,000, and consecrated as St. Peters. 
The unusual length of nave, seventy feet, 
as compared with the chancel, thirty feet, 
is a noticeable feature of the architecture. 
Its seating capacity is approximately three 
hundred and sixty. The absence from the 
new windows of the old wire screens re- 
moves the last witness to traces of the old 
colonial repugnance. The church has 
served as a training-school for a number 
of well-known churchmen including Dr. 
Storrs Seamor and the Rev. A. Douglas 
Miller. At present the roll-call is 93 fam- 
ilies, 276 baptized persons and 165 com- 
municants. 

On the west side of Jefferson bridge, in 
front of the First church, the Baptists 



.-.*.. 





WEST MAIN AND CHERRY STREETS. 



*As early as 1739 the few Episcopalians in town tried to maintain their right, accord- 
ing to the Connecticut Laws of 1708 and 1727, to be exempted from the Congregational tax. 



MILFORD. 



573 



used to hold their immersions. The 
society was organized by the Rev. James 
H. Linsley of Stratford in 1831. At first 
they worshipped in a school-house but 
after 1833 in the town-hall. In 1845-46 
they built a small church at the rear of 
the hall on the site of the first town house. 
The society had so decreased in members 
by 1866, that they decided to sell their 
church to the town and to merge them- 
selves in the other churches. The hall 
had in 1854 been moved into line with the 
church and the two were incorporated in- 
to the present municipal building in 1875. 
During the last ten 
years, the colored 
Baptists have revived 
the faith, holding in 
one of the halls, 
almost regular Sun- 
day services, which 
are led by a visiting 
minister. Being out 
of debt and with 
something in hand 
towards a church, 
they hope soon to 
have a building ot 
their own. 

Broad street from 
the Memorial Bridge 



employing seven hundred hands, by the 
more modern business methods, it, as one 
of the three Vanderhoef factories (Milford, 
Wrentham and Norvvalk), requires from 
two hundred to two hundred and fifty 
operatives for its special line of goods. 
One of the first industries of its kind in 
the country, it was removed from New 
York to Milford about 1850 by Mr. 
Vanderhoef who had been the first to 
propose American-made straw hats to 
take the place of imported ones. He 
associated with himself the Flagg brothers 



and the late Nathan A. Baldw 



Straw 



r32& 53/^1 




ST PETER S EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



to the foot of Golden 

Hill, where on one side runs the Bridge- 
port Turnpike and on the other, at a little 
distance, pass the four parallel tracks of 
the Consolidated Road — Bread street 
bears witness to the energy of the men of 
the old and the new generations. From 
the library steps one can alrrost throw a 
stone over to the harbor head where once 
the Common House stood and where now 
stand the Straw Hat Works familiarly 
known as Baldwin's Straw shop. During 
its half century of existence, it has given 
employment to many thousands of people 
and sent out millions of hats. For a time 



hats have been the chief industry, although 
experiments have been made in allied 
fields. Straw matting, for instance, can 
be better made in all respects, but not. 
with the present impost duty on raw 
material, cheaply enough to compete with 
the low-priced foreign stuff. Some 
vagaries in hats — like the " Snowflakes " 
at times have seized the public fancy and 
set night and day shifts hurrying to 
their work. After sewing machines were 
introduced in 1866 to sew the imported 
braid, one thousand dozen hats per day 
could be turned out. It was the first 



39 



574 



MILFORD. 



factory to use both foreign and domestic 
straw. 

From the straw-shop, looking across at 
the Gulf, one can see the large plant of 
Wm. M. Mervvin & Sons. Starting at 
Milford Point in the oyster beds of 1752, 
this industry has continued for one hun- 
dred years. In small huts, banked with 
sea-weed, half a hundred oystermen would 
bide the long winter through. Nowadays, 
the oyster spawn is set on jingle shells, or 
spick and span clean bits of oyster shells, 
in beds staked out some miles off shore. 
The young crop is carefully tended, men 





--■*■■ "*%.;;... 



OYSTERMEN' S HUTS. 

hired to destroy their enemy, the jellyfish. 
Boats from Providence and other ports 
carry these oysters of two and three years 
growth to be replanted in grounds more 
favorable for the maturing bivalves. 
Finally they reach the market under the 
names of these different localities. This 
successful industry crowns several unfortu- 
nate ventures. 

It would be agreeable if all historic 
monuments told their story as plainly as 
the soldier who stands at parade-rest on 
Milford green, suggestive not only of the 
patriotism that hastened to the preserva- 
tion of the Union but to the making of it, 



for Milford mounted her guns in 1775. 
established her post of minute-men under 
Capt. Isaac Miles, erected her batteries 
the following year at Burns' Point, Fort 
Trumbull, and camped her soldiers at 
Burwell's Farms (Woodmont) and Poco- 
noc (Milford; Point. Capt. Sam'l Peck 
commanded the first company raised for 
the general defence of the country. Cap- 
tain Charles Pond and William Cogge- 
shall officered one of the first vessels 
equipped by the colony. 

Other memories of the past come to us 
on Broad street from the several old houses 
thereabout. All 
of them with an- 
ecdotal history 
if it could be 
reached, Some 
simply reminis- 
cent of the olden 
time like the 
Thad. Baldwin 
house with its 
Dutch door and 
more than six 
score years of 
existence, or the 
house nearly op- 
posite on the hill 
next to the resi- 
dence of Sheriff Tomlinson. Both of 
these stand within the domain of the 
widow's portion, the plucky widow 
Martha Beard to whom the town at 
the settlement gave four acres (the land 
extending down Broad street towards 
the river as far as the present Jabez 
Smith house) for herself and her four 
boys, orphaned at sea on their voyage 
over. Other houses bear yet marks of 
their earlier grandeur. From the steps of 
the new Park Hotel, where stood for 
many years the historic Milford Hotel, 
burned in 1897, three houses confront 
one. Counting from the Bridgeport side, 



id M 



MIL FORD. 



575 



the first, the George Miles house, though 
remodeled, is said to be of considerable 
age, and has the gruesome story of the 
man who hung himself in the barn. Its 
successive owners are George W. Miles, 
Richard Baldwin, George Cornwall, George 
Crofut, who married Grace Merwin, back 
to Miles Merwin who built it, and the 
sixth Miles Merwin in direct descent. He 
was living in the house in 1817. The 
house probably dates about 1780 or 
earlier. 



grandson of John Coggeshall of Newport, 
President of the Colony. William was 
born in 1732. bred a sailor, became cap- 
tain of a coaster, and married Mehitable, 
daughter of Deacon John Smith, in 1759. 
The house, therefore, dates from about 
the middle of the last century. 

The third house of the group was built 
by Garrett, father of Abraham Van Horn 
de Witt in 1750. This rich merchant of 
Dutch extraction had married Margaret 
Van Horn of New York. About this 




THE GREEN. 



The second house, now owned by Mrs. 
Sarah M. Baldwin was for a time kept by 
Captain Trowbridge as a tavern.* It has 
sheltered many generations and of varied 
lineage. Retracing its history, its pre- 
vious owners were Joseph Merwin and 
Horace Kelsey, then Lucius Tuttle and 
one Beeman ; then Captain Stephen 
Trowbridge to whom George Coggeshall 
sold it Nov. 25, 181 7, for one thousand 
dollars. Thence it belonged to the 
Coggeshalls for three or four generations, 
backward to William, son of Freegift, 



time, East Indian trade and ship-building 
with all its allied industries made life in 
Milford easy and prosperous. So bright 
was the outlook for a young metropolis, 
that the sanguine merchant declared it 
would be a waste of glass to put windows 
on one side of the house, where soon his 
neighbors' dwellings would close up the 
view. In the Dutch curb-roofed attic, the 
slaves slept, and tradition says that when 
ready for a lark, after dark, they would 
lower themselves to the ground by a rope. 
Unfortunately someone got a thrashing 



'Known as Washington House, 1817-1838. 



576 



MILFORD. 




THE THAD. BALDWIN PEACE. 

the night the rope broke, and, in breaking, 
broke up the sport. A line upon the 
window pane records the triumphant 
manufacture of a hoop-skirt in 1782*, by 
her who, when scarcely more than a child, 
was laid to rest "as the amiable consort of 
Mr. Abm. V. H. DeWitt and daughter of 
Capt. Charles Pond, aged 20." Garrett's 
son, Abraham, had 
married, and his 
little motherless 
daughter, Patty, 
was brought up in 
the old DeWitt 
homestead. It 
was the grandest 
mansion in the 
town, 40x30 feet, 
with a fine hall, 
ten feet wide ex- 
tending through 
it. It was two 
stories high and 
had good sized 
rooms with high 
ceilings. the 



By the DeWitts it was sold 
to Charles Pond in 1780. In 
1856, I believe, it passed into 
the hands of J. W. Merwin, 
and is now occupied by Mr. 
Charles Trowbridge. 

Diagonally opposite and 
stretching down to the corner 
of High street was the prop- 
erty known to the citizens of 
the early half of the eighteenth 
century as the Dr. Harpine 
(or Herpin) place, later as the 
Pond mansion. The house 
was destroyed some years 
ago. Dr. Herpin bought the 
property from a Bryan in 
1725. About 1785 the Her- 
pins sold it to the Pond family who held 
it to 1 86 1 or later. The house was prob- 
ably built by Dr. Herpin. Captain Charles 
Pond married for his second wife Cath- 
erine, sister of Garrett DeWitt, and, after 
buying the DeWitt house, passed the 
Herpin place to his son Captain Charles 
Hobby Pond. One relic of the old house 




GOVERNOR POND PEACE. 



*Patty Pond made a hoop-skirt in this room, 1782. 



MILFORD. 



577 



remains. It is a pane of window glass 
upon which, in the lull of the dance, an 
angry man cut with his diamond — 

•"If sins like S Bryan's can be forgiven, 

Then Judas and she may go to heaven." 

to mark the embilterment of man and 
maid. 

The new Methodist church, a memorial 
built by the late Henry A. Taylor to his 
first wife, carries one back a hundred 
years to that picturesque figure of early 



He was nicknamed " Old Shirt Silliman " 
because he manufactured shirts, and fre- 
quently on week days came to Milford to 
dispose of them. A converted sailor,Mr. 
Waterbury. gained a hold on the seafar- 
ing people, of whom there was a large 
percentage. In 1836 there was a class of 
twenty-seven members. Rapidly increas- 
ing to sixty, they purchased Bristol's shoe- 
shop, moving it to North street near the 
Orange road. In 1843-44 they built at a 
cost of three thousand dollars a church 




THE DEWITT HOUSE AXD CAPTAIN TROWBRIDGE TAVERX 



methodism, Jesse Lee, with whose daring, 
whose impetuosity, whose humor, hard 
sense and good judgment, the people of 
Connecticut soon became familiar. On 
August 16, 1789. he preached in the Mil- 
ford town-house to a lar^e crowd that in- 
cluded many of the best people. They 
were much moved by his eloquence. As 
no one offered the hospitality of a night's 
lodging, he rode away. Three times he 
thus preached. The seed took root. A 
Mr. Silliman of Bridgeport, a local 
preacher, continued the proselytizing. 



where Bailey and Smith are located on 
River street. The following year Stephen 
B. Bangs was settled over them. Their 
numbers increasing they remodeled 
the church Finding they were outgrow- 
ing it in 1893, Mr. Taylor built for them 
the new church at a cost of thirty* thou- 
sand dollars, thus embodying Mrs. Taylor's 
wish that a deserving church of her own 
faith should receive, in her memory, such 
substantial aid. The people built the 
chapel at a cost of five thousand dollars, 
upon which remains a small debt which, 



578 



MILFORD. 




METHODIST CHURCH. 

through the efforts of the people and the 
assistance of the Taylors, will be cleared 
by 1900. The interior of the church is 
simple and dignified ; the arrangements 
of the chapel for Sunday school and social 
meetings, quite complete. The church 
numbers 104 families, 500 members, 165 
communicants. 

Off Broad street, on Wharf street, once 
familiarly known as Pork Lane, is the 
Stephen Stowe house, dating from 1689 or 
earlier,the residence of Howard Piatt. The 
house is medium size, two stories in height 
with high garret 
under its gable 
roof and a frame 
of heavy oak 
timber. In 1777 
Stephen Stowe 
owned the house. 
From his wife 
Freelove Bald- 
win Stowe the 
local Chapter of 
the Daughters of 
the American 
Revolution takes 
its name. It was 
her father who 



lost, his life while nursing 
the sick soldiers from the 
prison ship which a British 
vessel landed at the wharf 
below. This house dis- 
putes with the Jonah Clark 
or Law house on Gover- 
nor's avenue, only recently 
all but hidden by great 
trees, the right to be con- 
sidered the most ancient 
in the town. To digress a 
moment, the Lewis Welch 
house, next the Jonah 
Clark is not so ancient as 
it seems. 

Once upon a time Mil- 
ford houses held rare china and glass from 
abroad, quaint utensils of brass and copper, 
while firearms of antique pattern lay peace- 
fully beside bandboxes of ancient generos- 
ity and chests with silks galore. If a gale 
should take off the long slant roof of the 
Abraham Clark or Wilson house, in the 
depths of the attic would be seen the mas- 
sive stone chimney, and clustered in its 
shadow an antiquated brass-studed pigskin 
trunk, cheek by jowl with an old-fashioned 
wooden cradle, a battered shoemaker's 
bench — that emblem of Milford's former 




THE) STEPHEN STOWE HOUSE. 



MILFORD. 



5 79 










' 



#* 



wealth — and 
near at hand 
the ancient 
mortar, a yard 
deep ; naught 
but a hollowed 
tree trunk! 
The pestle was 
often a small 
limb. Some- 
times these 
hollowed trees 
were used for 
barrels. I leave 
the camera to 
portray the 
glories of the 
ancient kitchen 
while fancy adds the groups of bustling 
girls and hungry boys of the Clark-Peck 
clan. Abraham Clark married Mehitable 
Peck. 

If one seeks a living-room to supple- 
ment the Wilson kitchen, one turns to a 
house just off the Bridgeport turnpike.* 
There rests the brass warming-pan, the 
flip-dog used at Governor Treat's wedding, 
the modern sword of 1812, the flint-lock 
of Queen Anne's War, borne by a sturdy 



■ :.V' 




H 



I * ■■ 



THE JONAS CURK OR EAW HOUSE. 




THE WEECH HOUSE. 



ancestor. On the narrow shelf above the 
fire-place are the pewter and the brasses. 
Passing to the rooms beyond, both sharing 
the wide chimney flue, one reveals a 
wealth of colonial furniture while the other 
is redolent of the hearty cheer to which 
its ancient china contributed. 

In this section of the town stood yet 
another house that the necessities cf the 
railroad have swept away. Some of its 
solid oaken timbers, fully sixteen inches 
broad by eight inches 
thick, the ornamental 
stair-railing and one of 
its many cup -boards 
still exist. It was the 
best preserved house in 
town. From its porch 
George White fie Id 
preached his memora- 
ble sermon. Its knock- 
er is now on the tower 
door of the Memorial 
Bridge. The interior of 
the house was finished 
with great care. Over 
the hall up which the 



*Exterior of the Ensign Clark or Pond house in March number. 



580 



MILFORD. 




THE WILSON HOUSE. 

stairs ascended was a trap door opening 
into a large attic which was used as a 
store-house about 1700, by its owner, Mr. 
Edward Allen, an extensive ship-builder 
and importer. The heat of the big chim- 
ney made it a fine, dry place for storing 
salt, tea, etc. Garrett De Witt's wife was 
the daughter of Major Baldwin into whose 
hands the house passed about the middle 
of the century. De Witt afterwards built 
near the fence and to the right of the 
illustration, a small store for the retailing 
of provisions and dress 
goods. It was afterwards 
used for a school and 
later for a shoe - shop. 
In 1801, Captain Samuel 
Stowe bought the house 
and lived in it several 
years. In 18 14 he sold 
it to Elnathan Baldwin 
whose eleven children 
were born and bred within 
its walls. After his death 
it became the property 
of Mr. Charles Beardsley. 
By him it was razed in 
1893, the valley and 
brook before it filled in 



and bridged over for the 
new tracks of the Con- 
solidated. It is said to 
have been built on the 
foundations of the George 
Clark, Sr., house. This 
first settler's home, it will 
be recalled, was one of 
the two houses fortified 
against the Indians. With 
the sharp rise of ground 
behind, the brook before, 
it was to be the refuge for 
the West End settlers. 
The tradition is borne 
out by the construction 
of the cellar window — a 
solid angle of masonry with apex inward 
subtended, each giving the hidden mus- 
keteer the greatest protection and the 
widest range for his weapon. 

Scattered through the town are numbers 
of these old houses, among them the 
Tibballs house, the Nettleton, the Ford 
houses, and the Deacon John Benjamin 
place with its ancient well-sweep, and the 
very old David Smith house on West 
Main street, owned by Mrs. Sarah Baldwin, 
daughter of David Smith. The latter 




whitefiei,d's pulpit. 



MILFORD. 



581 



married a daughter of Deacon William 
Atvvater who owned the house as far back 
as 1 781. At an earlier date one Miles 
built the house and it is probably the 
third in point of age among the Milford 
dwellings. It has the great stone chimney 
of its contemporaries. 

Milford people still recall Miss Sally 
Gunn's school, held in the Stephen Gunn 



power of small beginnings. Nearly a half 
century ago, a group of people of the 
Roman Catholic faith gathered in a pri- 
vate house at the Gulf to listen to the first 
mass celebrated in Milford. For several 
years, occasional, say monthly services 
were thus held by Father O'Brien of St. 
Mary's Church, New Haven. Between 
184c and 1845 ne built the first St. Mary's 




KITCHEN IN THE WILSON HOUSE. 



house. Within, the great fire-place settles 
on either side received the disciples of 
Minerva. The threat of a journey to the 
dark abyss of the cellar was almost suffi- 
cient to quell any youthful culprit whose 
valor surpassed discretion. P"or a time 
the house was the home of the Milford 
Library, its books being kept there. 

On Gulf street, a small building known 
as St. Mary's Hall, is silent witness to the 



Church as a mission. It was attached 
first to St. Mary's, East Bridgeport. From 
this church came Father O'Gorman and 
Father Drea. In 1872, St. Mary's, Mil- 
ford, was transferred to Derby in order 
to increase that parish sufficiently to jus- 
tify giving to the incumbent an assistant, 
and by so doing to lighten the labors of 
Father John Lynch, who had grown old 
and feeble in the service of the church. 



582 



MILFORD. 




AN OLD-TIME JIVING ROOM. 
Courtesy Mrs. Nathan G. Pond. 

Since 1875, regular Sunday services have 
been held in Milford. In 1878 Father 
Peter Kennedy took charge. In 1883 he 
built the present church and consecrated 
it as St. Mary's Star of the Sea. At this 
time the church attained its maximum 
strength of four hundred souls, at which 
number it still remains. With other 
churches it feels the drain upon it through 
the death of the older members and the 
steady outgoing of the younger to other 
centers of industry. In 1885 Milford 
became a distinct parish under Father 
James Larkin, 
former assistant 
at St. John's, 
New Haven. He 
was succeeded 
by Dr. Maher, 
whose service 
closed in the 
early spring. 
To-day, Milford 
is the parent of 
the mission 
church of St. 
James, Stratford 
comprising two 
hundred souls. 



It is also the headquarters for 
the American Apostolate Mis- 
sion, its parish priest, Father 
McClean, being the Superior 
thereof, and having with him 
an assistant, Father Edward 
Flannery, and the curate of 
the parish, Rev. Michael P. 
Hart. The mission took its 
origin about ten years ago 
among the Paulist Fathers of 
New York, and its work con- 
sists of " Missions," or a series 
of sermons to Catholics, and 
of lectures to non-Catholics, 
delivered in different localities 
upon invitation. The lectures 
confine themselves to the setting forth 
from the Roman point of view of doc- 
trines common to Protestant churches, 
with the intent that their tone shall be 
expository rather than proselytizing. 

A number of these ancient dwellings 
group themselves about North street. 
Some of them bear the decay of ages ; 
others, well preserved, testify to the ven- 
eration for the family homestead, such as 
the Sanford and two Downes' houses. 
The Anson Treat Downes house with the 
ancient panes of window glass in strong 




THE DAVID SMITH HOUSE. 



Mf L FORD. 



83 



new casings, is built upon a 

framework, believed to be the 

one raised in 1639. The old 

Strong house stood to within 

a few years on West River 

street in the rear of the First 

Church. A slight elevation 

in the present apple orchard 

marks the site of the ancient 

cellar. The house was built 

between 1690-1705 by Eph- 

raim Strong. It was large, 

38 x 30 ft. r fhe sides of the 

third story projected nearly 

two feet beyond the second 

story all the way around the 

house, which had the high garrett and 

curbed roof. Several chambers were of 

goodly size. The frame of the house was 

of oak, some of the beams measuring 

twenty inches in diameter. 

Milford's seven mile triangle from 
Oyster river to the Housatonic, from 
the shore to the Orange line, has many 
picturesque bits, as well as many more old 
homesteads bordering the roads that lead 
over the hills to flourishing farms, or along 
the ancient post road or over the old 
Burwell farms road to the summer colony 





THE STRONG HOUSE. 



ST. MARY S ROMAN CATHOUC CHURCH, 



at Woodmont, or to the pretty cottages at 
Burns' Point, or along the Gulf, and on the 
coast toward Stratford. One modern 
looking brick house may be singled out as 
the first brick house in Milford, because its 
builder, Benjamin Peck, baked the brick 
himself. His brother Cornelius built a 
similar house, since destroyed, near that 
part of the town known as Blue City. 

The flourishing farms reveal a new in- 
dustry in Milford. Many of them are 
wholly given up to the raising of vegeta- 
ble seeds for market. Onions, corn, 
beans, etc., are 
thrown into sacks or 
barrels and great 
loads of inconceiv- 
able numbers of seeds 
make their slow way 
to the station to be 
forwarded to the dis- 
tributing houses. 

The Pines still 
overlook the Gulf as 
in the days when 
Captain Kidd came 
ashore; or when 
Miles, Strong and 
Miles bleached their 
goods and the boys 



58 4 



MILFORD. 



"lapped'lasses" 
from the leak- 
ing barrels ; 
when heavily 
laden vessels 
rode at anchor 
near Charles' 
Island while 
their cargoes 
were scowed 
ashore or sled- 
ded on the ice ; 
when cabin 
boys and sail- 
ors drove their 
venture in 
geese or in other live-stock to the shore 
before the summer resident had been 
dreamed of or the glory of Charles' Island 
as a summer resort had waxed and waned. 
The old quarry for verd-antique has been 
abandoned, the large box factory stands 




THE FIRST BRICK HOUSE IN MII y FORD. 



empty, the shoe industry has sought other 
centers, but the Milford of to-day has the 
same skies, the same roads, many of the 
same interests and the same hospitality as 
of old. 







NEAR THE ISEAND. 







©HKHEM,©(30A 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



CORRECTION. 

In query No. 105 (g), Oct. Number. — "He 
was father of Mary Williams " should 
read " Was he father, etc." 

ANSWERS. 

145. (a) Rebecca, dau. of Lt.-Gov. 
James Bishop was born Dec. 10, 1673, 
married Nov. 4, 1695. Samuel Thomp- 
son died April 5, 1734. Her tomb- 
stone can be seen in the Grove Street 
Cemetery, New Haven, among old 
ones arranged against the north wall. 

E.T. F. 

102. (d). There were but two Mary Wrights 
in Wethersfield of marriageable age but 
unmarried in 1 714 when John Stanley 
married. One was 49 years of age, the 
other 25. We are safe therefore, failing 
other evidence, to accept the latter as 
the one who married John Stanley. 
This Mary Wright, was born Dec. 13, 
1689, dau. of Samuel and Rebecca 
(dau. Moses Crafts) Wright — he son of 
Samuel and Mary (Butler) Wright. 
Mary Butler, dau. of Richard Butler of 
Hartford. T. H. L. 

NOTES. 

The following records are from a copy 
of Watson's Connecticut Almanack for 
585 



1777, printed at Hartford, now in my 
possession. The entries were probably 
made by a resident of West Springfield, 
Mass. Albert C. Bates. 

Lendiah Ashley's girl, died, Jan. 27, 
1777. Rev. John(?) Hooker (?), died 
of ye small pox, Feb. 6, 1777. Wd. 
Sarah Miller of Chicapee, died Feb. 21, 
1777. Wd. Sarah Ball, died, March 
12, 1777. Doctor Reuben Champion, 
died, March 29, 1777. Mr. Samuell 
Morgan, died, May 1, 1777. Dorcas Ely, 
wife of John Ely, died, July [ ], 1777, 
of the small pox. Col. David Leonard, 
died, July 4, 1777. Mr. Eben Day, died, 
Aug. 15, 1777. John Rockwell, died, 
Aug. 26, 1777. Henry Roggers child, 
died, Aug. 31, 1777. Tim. Morgan, 
youngest child, died, Aug. 30 (?). 
[ ] child, died, Aug. 2, 1777. 

; ] died, Aug. 8, 1777. Mr. 

George Bricks son Larree, died, Sept. 2, 
1777. Eben. Days Eunice (?), died, 
Sept. 6, 1777. Ruth Taylor, daughter of 
widow Ruth Taylor, died, Sept. 4, 1777. 
Ebenezer Miller, child, died, Sept. 5 , 1 7 7 7 . 
Oliver Leonard, wife, died, nth Sept. 
] Hoskins son, died, [ ] 18, 
1777. Eben. Miller 2d, daughter, died, 



586 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



19th of Sept. Eben. Miller 2d, youngest 
child, died, Sept. 25th. Benj. Leonard 2d, 
child, died, Sept. 16th. Mr. Hezekiah 
Day, died, Oct. n, 1777. Margaret 
Rockwell, died, Oct. 21, 1777. General 
Burgoyne & his armey surrendered to the 
Americans [ ], Oct. 13 (?) 1777. 

Justin Smith, died, Nov. 26, 1777. Luke 
Day 3d, died, Nov. 27, 1777. Wm. Ely, 
child, died, Nov. 28, 1777. Wellar, died, 
Dec. 21, 1777, at Mr. Stebbins. 

QUERIES. 

109. Gladden. — Daniel 1 of Higganum, 
Conn.(d. Dec. 6, i8i7),m. first Dec. 29, 
1768, (Killingworth, Cg'l. Ch. Rec ,) 
Dinah Wilcox and had : Daniel 2 , m. 
Nancy Collins and had : Edwin 3 who 
had Niles E. 4 of Essex. Daniel 1 , m. 
second about 1772 Bethia, b. June 13, 
1751, d. Dec. 26, 1843 ; dau. of Nathan 
and Constant (Tiffany), Buckingham. 
Daniel 1 and Bethia had : 1. Russell 2 , 

b. 1774, m. 1799 Deborah Prout 

eight children. 2. Rebecca 2 , 1777 ; 
probably never married. 3. Lydia 2 
1779; probably never married. 4. 
Dinah 2 Feb. 1781,111. 1829 Olive Prout; 
no children. 5. Sally 2 Apr. 1783, m. 

Thaddeus Manning 2 children. 6. 

Esther 2 , April 16, 1786, m. Feb. 1809 
Welles Knowles, my father. 7. Nathan 
Buckingham 2 , Dec. 31, 1788, m. 1816 

Sally Miller 2 sons. 8. James 2 , 

1790, d. aet. 9. 9. Selden 2 , July 6, 
1794, m. first 1 816, Lydia H. Lane 

6 children; m. second 1851 Mrs. 

Nancy Bonfoy, S. P. 10. Silvanus 2 , 
Mch. 27, 1796, m. Nov. n, 1823 Han- 
nah Post of Westbrook — - — 1 child. 
Who were parents and grand-parents of 
Daniel? It is thought his father was 
Josiah. E. G. 

no. (a) Poison. — Elizabeth, alias Dela- 
port, widow of Edward Poison ; was in 
Stratford, Conn., in 17 16. What be- 
came of her? What children did she 



have ? They were French. 
(b). — Cosier. — Thomas, on Jan. 23, 
1719-20, chose his uncle, John Read of 
Norwalk, Conn., his guardian. Who 
was father of Thomas, and what children 
did he have ? F. P. G. 

in. Holmes. — An Indian, married a 
white lady and resided on Alligator 
River, Dare County, Eastern, N. C. 
They had a son who took the name of 
Henry 1 Holmes. He married and had : 

I. Henry 2 , who m. and had 1. 

Wilson 3 . 2. Nels (on?) 3 . 3. Wm. 
Daniel 3 (Edenton, Chowan Co., N. C.) 

4. Patrick Henry 3 . 5. Mrs. 3 , 

Targinton. 6. Sylvia 3 , m. Belan- 

ger. II. Eliza 2 , m. . III. A 

dau. 2 , m. Trucks. IV. Trimi- 

gan 2 , born 1834, d. 1891, m. Mary dau. 
of Isaac and Sarah (Spruill) Bateman, 
and had: 1. Geo. Washington 3 , m. 
Anne Steely. 2. Doctrine Hillie 3 , m. 
Lavinia Targinton. 3. Wm. Daniel 3 , 
4. Henry Isaac 3 . 5. Thomas Crowder 3 , 
m. Anne Sexton. 6. Augustus Lee 3 , 
7. Charles Billops 3 . 8. Reine Victoria 3 , 
m. Lorenzo Dow Spruill. 9. Sarah 
Trimigan 3 , m. Benj. Franklin Spruill. 
10. Mary Belle 3 , n. Bertha Justine 3 . 
Who was wife, father and mother of 
Henry 1 Holmes? W. D. H. 

Ti2. (a). — Hubbard. — Caleb, b. 1748, 
m. 1779 Elizabeth Johnson. He died, 
July 4, 1802. Was he in the Revolu- 
tionary War? 

(b). — Wells. — Joshua of East Windsor, 
b. Feb. 22, i74i,.d. Dec. 9, 1809, m. 
Zeruiah Trumbull. Was he in the Rev- 
olutionary War ? E. H. J. 

113. Eddy. — Charles, lived in Hartford, 
Conn., from 1731 to 1742, and in 
Glastonbury, Conn., from 1743, till 
his death, Feb. t, i 77 i. In 1739 or 
1740 he married Mary Meakins of 
Hartford, who died Aug. 1, 1743, leaving 
(1) a daughter Anne, born Aug. 25, 



GENE A LOGIC A L DEPAR TMENT. 



587 



1740. Jan. 11, 1743-4, he married 
Hannah Loveland ; had (2) a dau. 
Hannah, born July n, 1746, and (3) a 
son Charles, Jr., born Aug. 22, 1748. 
Said (1) Anne married Daniel Andrus, 
had seven children and died Dec. 10, 
1827. Said daughter (2) Hannah, 
married Remembrance Brewer, Nov. 
14, 1 764 and had several children. Said 
(3) Charles, Jr., m. Oct. 25, 1770, 
Hannah Kellsey of Wethersfield, and 
before June 1777, removed to New 
Britain, Conn. ; he had children : Ruth, 
Charles, Billy, Hannah, Eunice,Thomas, 
Polly, Billy and Joseph, who was born 
in 1788. Who were the parents of the 
first-mentioned Charles Eddy? 

Willard Eddy. 

114 Webster. — John 5 , born at Lebanon, 
Conn., Nov. 29, 1727, died May 10, 
1750, was a son of John Webster 4 
(John 3 , Thomas 2 , Gov. John 1 ) born 
July 10, 1702, and Mary Dewey his 
wife. Married, Aug. 20, 1724. His 
son John 6 , born probably about 1 74 7-8, 
married for his second wife Rebecca 
West. Wanted, the name of wife, date 
and place of marriage of the first-men- 
tioned John Webster; also the date 
and place of marriage of his son John. 

M. M. 

115 Blakeslee. — Jonathan, and his two 
brothers came from England and first 
settled at New Haven, Conn. Jonathan 
married a widow Minturn who had one 
son, Hiram Minturn. They had two 
daughters, 1st Esther, 2nd Sarah. 

Esther married Olcutt, or 

Orcutt ; Sarah married Caleb Beach 
and lived in Winchester. Jonathan was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war ; 
under whom did he enlist? Wanted 
also any information in regard to the 
Blakeslee family. H. H. D. 

116. Dickinson. — Obadiah Dickinson 
was born in Wethersfield in 1743. 



Lived in East Windsor, Conn, [had 
children, viz: Obadiah, born, 1770; 
Seth, 1772; Elizabeth, 1774; Hannah, 
1776; Horace, 1778; Mary, 1780; 
Anson, 1782 ; Ethan, 1784 ; Lois, 1787]. 
I wish to know the name of his wife, 
the date of their marriage, the date of 
their death, and anything that pertains 
to his history. 

Address : F. P. G., 

501 West Genesee St., 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

117 (a) David Day. — Born, Oct. 19, 
1728, had, Molly, Lydia, Sarah, Noah, 
David, Elkanah, Hannah, Eliphalet, 
Rufus, Ruth, Cylinda, James and Cyrus ; 
his son Noah was born Feb. 14, t 75 7, 

m.x\lice and had, Luthera, Hosea, 

Ruth Hannah, Edith, Noah, David, 
Lydia and Alvah ; his son David, b. 
Oct. 13, i79i,m. Rhada Wheelock and 
had, Luthera, Daniel and Luther. I 
desire anything of the ancestry of these 
wives or of the first named David Day, 
or suggestions as to their location, for I 
do not know their residences. 
(b) Wanted, the ancestry of Matha 
Risley, who m. May 10, 1738, Samuel 
Elmer. 

(e) Foster. — Abraham, b. June 11, 
1696, m., Nov. 30, 1727, Elizabeth, 
dau. John and Abigail (Strong) Moore ; 
she b. May 4, 1702 and d. Sept. 19, 
1800; he d. May 2, 1784. Wanted 
ancestry of Abraham Foster, he prob- 
ably lived in East Windsor, or there 
abouts. T. H. L. 

118. Parker. — James A. Parker to Phebe 
Mix m. in New Haven, April 30, 181 3, 
(second wife Harriet Mix m. in New 
Haven, June 2, 1827). Who were the 
parents of James A. Parker? and of 
Phebe Mix? J. A. P., d. Aug. 21, 1828. 
Phebe P., d. Dec. n, 1826. In list of 
deaths his name is given as James 
Andross Parker. A. M. J. 



EDITORIAL. 



ONE of the passions which seems to 
be inborn in man is that of collect- 
ing. Almost every one of us is a collector 
along some line ; with many the chief ten- 
dency being to collect the "filthy lucre." 
Of that it is not now our purpose to speak ; 
but rather the gathering together of some 
particular class of objects of art or vertu, 
or of curious or historic interest. With 
the increased interest in such collections 
developed during recent years, and the 
consequent rising in values, has come the 
counterfeiting of almost every class of 
objects. One class, the pottery, imple- 
ments, and ornaments of our pre-historic 
peoples familiarly spoken of as Indian 
relics, would appear to defy the 
wiles of the counterfeiter. Yet not many 
years since vague rumors began to float 
to the eastward that fine specimens 
occasionally obtained from that extensive 
region known as " the west" were some- 
times " not what they seemed." Soon 
those rumors became a certainty. Even 
then, however, collectors felt safe with 
what are called eastern or New England 
specimens — they at least were all genuine, 
and their ancient appearance caused by 
long burial in the ground or exposure 
upon its surface, would always serve to 
distinguish them. But now deceit has 
invaded even the land of steady habits. 



If the Genius of Connecticut surmounting 
our State Capital looks sharply she will 
discover within the range of her vision at 
least two places where Indian relics are 
now being manufactured for the benefit 
of an unsuspecting public ; while almost 
beneath her feet she will see these objects 
mixed with the genuine and offered for 
sale. One " manufacturer " still lacks the 
knack and his products will be readily 
distinguished ; the other is more success- 
ful and has produced some good speci- 
mens which would easily pass for genuine 
if the collector's suspicions were not 
aroused. It has been our privilege once 
to visit the workshop of the latter. The 
tools of the trade are few and simple — a 
block of iron for an anvil, an iron hammer 
and several stones for the same use, a 
number of hard and sharp edged stones 
for use in chipping, a piece of an old 
grindstone to rub off the rough edges. 
Then, given some pieces of stone which 
can be readily worked and an infinite 
amount of patience and this workman will 
produce a very creditable "ancient" 
specimen. Why does he do this? It 
cannot be that the financial returns will 
repay the time and labor involved — it 
must be done for the "fun " of deceiving 
the unsuspecting collector. Let the col- 
lector beware. 



BOOK NOTES. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The Brothers of the Book announce 
as their next publication a new rendering 
of the " Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam," by 
Elizabeth Alden Curtis, with an introduc- 
tion by Richard Burton. The edition will 
consist of six hundred numbered copies 
on Dutch hand-made paper, printed from 
new type on a new press, and bound in 



light green corded silk, with title in gold, 
and gilt tops. Price, one dollar. Sub- 
scriptions are invited and may be sent to 
the Scrivener, Laurence C. Woodworth, 
Gouverneur, New York. All subscriptions 
will be acknowledged, and numbers as- 
signed in order, as received. The edition 
will be ready during the last week in 
November, 1899. 




LACE CURTAINS 



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Werner's Dictionary of Synonyms & Antonyms, 
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A book that should be in the vest 
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tells you the right word to use. 
No Two Words in the English 
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Synonyms is needed to avoid repe- 
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I ne Readers 
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This is an age of education. iNo other nation en Mi e 
lace of the globe is so intelligent as ours, and 
intelligence makes a nation prosperous and 
happy. Education gives a young man the best 
chance in life. The easiest and cheapest "way to 
educate yourself and your children, irrespective of 
the schools and colleges, is by having the best 
current reading in your house. 



THE GREATEST FAMILY NEWSPAPER IS 

Leslies Illustrated Weekly. 



to recognize the counte- 

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It tells the story of contemporaneous events and illustrates it with the most 
artistic pictures. He who reads it every week learns 
nances of the noblest men and women in public and 
in private life ; the appearance of the world's most 
famous places, and the scenes of the greatest historic 
interest. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY is a paper to keep on the 
library table, and to read and reread, and to file away 
for useful reference. It is read by more families of 
culture and refinement among the masses than any 
other paper of its class in the world. It is the greatest, 
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educators. 

It *s for sale everywhere — on the stands, in the 
bookstores, on all trains, at I O cents per copy. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY, no Fifth Avenue, New York, 

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HISHOLINESS POPE LEOXill 

AWARDS GOLD MEDAL 

In Recognition of Benefits Received from 






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Chicago, 111. Windsor, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES AND 
POTPOURRI. 



EXCELLENT CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 

The December (Christmas) number of 
The Connecticut Magazine will be a particu- 
larly attractive one. The publishers are 
sparing no pains to make an extremely in- 
teresting number. New Haven will be 
the subject for the illustrated town article. 
A special cover is being prepared to adorn 
the issue, and we promise entertaining read- 
ing from beginning to end. 



WANTED— NAMES AND ADDRESSES. 

The publishers of The Connecticut Maga- 
zine desire names and addresses of persons 
out of the state, who might be interested in 
subscribing to the magazine. With this 
object in view we have utilized a column in 
the advertising pages of this issue, leav- 
ing blank spaces for names and addresses. 
We ask our readers to assist us in securing 
as many names as possible. The publishers 
will refund any postage that is required in 
sending us these names. 



AN OMISSION. 

We beg to call attention to an error 
appearing in the advertisement of the Baker 
Extract Company, of Springfield, which ap- 
peared in the October issue on the outside 
back cover. In justice to the exceptional 
fitness of the advertisement to interest our 
readers, we quote from a letter received from 
the Baker Co. which explains the omission. 
Proof was O. K. The type dropped when 
on the press. 

Springfield, Mass. 
Connecticut Magazine. 

GenTeEmen : — In looking over our ad. in 
the October Magazine we notice that the 
letter " s " in what was intended for the word 
" shell " is omitted. It is rather an unfortu- 
nate error, as we do not believe your sub- 
scribers will understand what "hell trade 
marks " are. 

Respectfully yours, 

BAKER EXTRACT CO. 

By T. W. Carman. 

STORY FOR CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 

We will present an entertaining story of 
historic interest in the December issue. The 
Story is entitled "The Treasure of the 
Money Ponds," and is written especially for 
The Connecticut Magazine by Prof. William 
Allen Wilbur of the Columbian University, 
Washington, D. C. 



THIS IS OUR TIGER 




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BUT FU*S OF 



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We believe 



When men of experience advise us. 

"Its something new ail the time, we hear 

from many lips/' 

Garments will wear out, and the question 

to decide is, How and Where to get just 



What is Proper. 



YOU MAY FEEL A PERFECT AS- 
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Toothaker 
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Tell you what is 
the style and the 
grade of goods to 
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Tailors 

of Experience. 

Sage -Allen Bldg.t 
902 Main Street, 
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Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



,:. : ..... ,, CAREY , S HABNESIA FLEXIBLE CEMENT ROOFING. 



in the process oJ laying 




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It is a non-conductor 
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WRITE FOR SAMPLE TO 

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can be engaged for Concerts, Religious and Social 
Entertainments, Funerals and work for Fraternal 
Orders. 

For terms, dates, etc., address William Richard Grif- 
fith, Bus. Mgr., 66 State St. Hartford, Conn. 



GIVEN AWAY! 




touches, Morris Chairs, Chiffoniers, Ladies' Desks, 
Oil Heaters, Tables. Silver c-ets, Goid Watches and 
twenty other gifts for disposing of our five and ten 
dollar assortments or toilet articles. 

No Wait for Coods. Premiums wbee 
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catalogue, or call afternoons. 

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SUFFERERS FROM 

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or Arir DRUG HABIT 

Can be permanently cured at their homes without pain, publicity or detention from business. No opiates used 
and ALL NATURAL POWERS FULLY RESTORED. Our free trial treatment alone cures hundreds of 
cases, and will he mailed fr«e to anv person suffering from a drug habit. The only scientific home treatment con- 
taining the ACTIVE LIFE PRINCIPLE. The most difficult cases successfully treated; perfect health restored; 
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48 West 24th St., New York City, or J. C. McALPINE, at same address. 

What a feiu of our patients say : ** Sample just gone ; it is two weeks since I have touched the drug." 
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taatiaa Tin? rV^MT-r-TTr-TTT MArA7TMTT wV^n vr.ii writf tr. advertiser*. 



POTPOURRI— ContiDued. 

Prof. Wilbur contributed an entertaining 
article on Mystic in our August number 
which has left a taste among our readers for 
more. 



HISTORICAL NOVEL FOR OUR 
READERS. 

We have arranged for our readers some- 
thing of more than ordinary interest in the 
line of a historical romance, founded on 
events that transpired in the Revolutionary 
time in the old town of Woodbury, Litch- 
field County. This romance entitled " The 
Glebe House " is written especially for The 
Connecticut Magazine by Chauncey C. 
Hotchkiss, the well known author of " In 
Defiance of the King," "A Colonial Free 
Lance," etc., and one of the most popu- 
lar writers of the day. The story will com- 
mence in our January number. 



Any enterprise that aims directly to the 
uplifting of humanity to a higher plane, 
physically as well as morally, is most com- 
mendable, and deserving of the hearty sup- 
port of all. With this object in view, The 
Connecticut Magazine takes pleasure in call- 
ing the attention of its readers to the estab- 
lishment of the beautiful Farmington Valley 
Sanatorium, on the old Collins estate at 
Collinsville, Connecticut, where treatment is 
administered for the cure of the alcoholic 
and drug habits, by a new and superior 
method. The spacious grounds, the grand 
old house — newly and beautifully furnished 
throughout, the charming scenery, bracing 
air, and the purest of spring water, are a few 
of the many alluring attractions of the place. 
The Sanatorium is conducted by Dr. Pierre 
D. Peltier, of Hartford, one of the most 
successful and most widely known practi- 
tioners in Connecticut ; and this fact, together 
with the visible results of the treatment, 
prompts us to give it our unsolicited ap- 
proval. 

Matthew Grant's descendants, who have 
formed and belong to the Grant Family 
Association, of America, held their reunion 
on October 27 th, at the Congregational 
Church in Windsor, the oldest Congrega- 
tional Church in America, and which is in 
close proximity to the home lot of Matthew 
Grant, the first of the Grant name in this 
country. It was a noteworthy occasion, 
there being an interesting historical address 
by Deacon Jabez H. Hayden, an address by 



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Add. Strength, Dept. A, Box 722, H'tf'd, Ct. 



Largest Line of 

FRAME 
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In the State. 

Artists' Materials. Water Colors \ 
Engravings, Oil Paintings, 
Etchings, Etc. 

WILEY'S ART STORE, 

251 Pearl Street, HARTFORD, CONN 




PRESERVE 

mM QUARTERLIES 

They will make a valuable addition to 
your library when they are bound. 

WE BIND THEM in Russia Back and Corners, 
Raised Bands, with Marble Paper Sides, $1.00 

Per Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Back and Corners, as above, $1.25 

All kinds and qualities of Magazine Binding. 

Blank Books of every description with flat opening backs. 

The Case, Lock wood & Brainard Co., 

HARTFORD, CONN, 



" The Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. 




WM. B CLARK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E. O. WEEKS, Vice-Presiden 

A. C. ADAMS, HENRY E. R RES, Assistant Secretaries. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



FREE 



SILK DRESS 



Full 10 to 15 yards of beautiful silk. Black, brown, blue, 
green or pink, in lightordark shades. Here is an honest advertisement. No beating around 
the bush. We make our offer of a silk dress free in plain English & we guarantee to send it 
with a solid gold laid carbon diamond breast pin which we give absolutely free to every person an- 
swering this advertisement who will sell only 6 boxes of our Positive Corn Cure at 25 cts. a box. If you 
agree to do this, order salve to-day & we will send it by mail, when sold you send us the $1 .50 & we 
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wonderful Remedies. Address at once MFR'S. SUPPLY DEPT.H, No. 65 Fifth Ave., New Ybrk City 




AUCTIONS 



in all parts of 
the state. 



Sales conducted throughout the state on Real 
Estate, Land Plots, Farms, Live Stock, Store 
Stocks, Furniture, Art Sales, etc. Write me 
if you wish to sell. 



Howard C. Bestor, 



Hartford, Ct. 



Semi-Weekly Courant 

$ I .00 a year. Send for Sample Copy. 
Address THE COURANT, Hartford, Ct. 



WRITING AND COPYING INK: 




Equal to the BEST But 

25 per cent 
Cheaper. 

All kinds and Colors. 

Ask your Dealer for 

"STANDARD" 

Standard Mucilage sticks bet- 
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BAIRSTOW INK CO., 

42 Union Place. Hartford, Conn. 



No 

Matter 

What 



your politics may be yotill laugh to 
" split your sides ** over JUDGE during 
the campaign of J 900. JUDGE has 
politics in pictures for the politician, 
humor for the humorist, and all-around 
good-natured satire for everybody. 
JUDGE'S cartoons are features of every 
political contest that a good American 
should not miss. 

JUDGE is published weekly and is 
to be found the world over. It is sold 
at 10 cents per copy, or by the year 
at $5.00. 

Remember, please, that 

Judge is 
the Prince of 
Caricaturists 



Two 

famous 

pictures 

printed in ten colors, ready for 
framing, will be given free to any 
person who will send a quarter for 
Three Months' subscription to 
Demorest's Family Magazine, the 
great paper for home life. Thou- 
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Demorest's for 25c. is made for 60 
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Write at once* 

Demorest's Family Magazine, 

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Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued. 

the Rev. Dr. Roland D. Grant, and a poem 
by Warren Fitch. This family is one of the 
most famous among the many which Windsor 
has given to the country. As everyone 
knows, it includes the hero of the war of 
the rebellion, General U. S. Grant. Others 
are : Oliver Ellsworth, chief justice of the 
supreme court of the United States; Zilpha 
Polly Grant Bannister, who was one of the 
first to provide for the education of women 
in America and established academies in 
Derry, N. H., and Ipswich, Mass., and in 
fact Mt. Holyoke College was the outgrowth 
of the inspiration given her assistant, Mary 
Lyon, the founder of that institution ; Seth 
Hastings Grant, ex-comptroller of New 
York City ; Edward Marshall Grant, who 
wrote the Bulgarian declaration of inde- 
pendence ; John C Grant, LL. D., pro- 
prietor of the Harvard School of Chicago ; 
Theodore E. Burton, congressman from 
Ohio ; in fact perhaps more people who 
have become prominent in the history of the 
country can trace their ancestry back to old 
Windsor than is true of any other single 
town in the United States. As an illustration 
of this fact may be quoted a foot note in 
Stiles's History of Ancient Windsor, regard- 
ing the descendants of the Rev. John War- 
ham, the first pastor of the old Congre- 
gational Church, which by the way, is the 
oldest Congregational Church in America, of 
which Matthew Grant was for many years 
clerk, and with whose family the Grants re- 
peatedly intermarried. Stiles says : 

"Among the many noted persons who 
have descended from the Rev. John Warham 
may be mentioned the Rev. Jonathan 
Edwards and son, Jonathan 2d, the Rev. Dr. 
Timothy Dwight, Judge John Trumbull, 
Aaron Burr, General William Williams, signer 
of the Declaration of Independence, the 
Hon. John Sherman, the Rev. Dr. Samuel A. 
Worcester, the Rev. Dr. Jonathan Edwards 
Woodbridge, ex- President Woolsey of Yale 
College, Judge Henry Morris of Springfield, 
the Rev. Dr. R. S. Storrs of Brooklyn, Stod- 
dard the missionary, " Grace Greenwood," 
General William T. Sherman, Bishop Williams 
!of the Episcopal Church, Mrs. Professor 
Yardley of Berkeley Divinity School and her 
sister, " Susan Coolidge," Alsop the poet, 
Dr. Gardiner Spring, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, 
and the Rev. Dr. Todd of New Haven." 
— The Hart/on/ Courant. 

WATCH THE CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 
The publishers of the Connecticut Maga- 
zine announce on another page an advertis- 
ers' contest. They desire good, clean and 




Harvey & Lewis, Opticians, PHOTOGRAPHIC 

865 Main St., Hartford, Conn. SUPPLIES. . . 



School Books, School Supplies, 

of all kinds — Kindergarten Goods, 
Wedding invitations and Visiting: 
Cards a Specialty. All kinds of 
Fashionable Engraving. 

"Trolley Trips in Historic New England," 
PRICE, 10 cents. 

Tlie BOOK Store. 



SMITH & McDONOUGH, 
30 J Main Street, . Hartford, Conn. 



FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF 

SAFES 

ROBERT H. ASHMEAD 

HARTFORD, CONN. 




For the 

FIXE 
TRADE 

Caramels and 
Chocolates, 
lee Cream, 
Fancy Cakes. 
Bon Boris, <fec. 
Mail and Ex- 
press orders 
promptly 
attended to. 

Telephone 
963. 



JACOBS, 

941 Main St., 
HARTFORD, 
CONN. 



Design by Conn. Magazine 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



ADVERTISERS' 
CONTEST... 



i 



THREE PRIZES! 



AS A SPECIAL INDUCEMENT to advertisers and in order to stimu- 
late an active and critical interest among our readers in our adver- 
tising pages, the publishers of The Connecticut Magazine offer a 
series of prizes for the THREE MOST ATTRACTIVE and meritorious 
ADVERTISEMENTS appearing in the December (Christmas) number. 



For the most attractive and meritorious advertisement, 
FIRST PRIZE. we will give SIX FREE INSERTIONS in the six issues 
next following the December issue. 

o ccr\ \rrk DDtyE For the advertisement next in merit, we will give 
OEKsUlVU rKlZ,E. poUR FREE INSERTIONS. 

THt&rk DDI7F} For the advertisement next in merit, we will give TWO 
I niKU ri^l£,E. FREB INSERTIONS. 

WINNERS will receive same amount of space in each issue as was 
used in competing advertisement. 

SPECIAL REDUCED RATES —The publishers offer advertisers the 
benefit of yearly rates for a single insertion in this number as follows: — 
One page $20.00, one-half page $H.OO, one-quarter page $6.00, one-eighth 
page $3.50, one inch $2.00. 

The contest will be in the hands of competent and impartial 
judges, whose names will be announced later. 

Forms for December issue close November 20. Magazine 
out promptly on December 1st. 



f 1 lHT r TMTH T TIVTTh and try for some FREE ADVERTISING that 
\Jd 1 UN 1 KJ J^llNJCi i s Good, Clean and Profitable. 



The December issue will be the BANNER NUMBER of 
the year. Address ♦ ♦ . 



The Connecticut Magazine, 



HARTFORD, 
CONN. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



POTPOURRI— Continued. 

attractive advertisements, and as a special 
inducement to advertisers, and to stimulate 
an active and critical interest among their 
readers in the advertising pages, they 
offer three prizes for the most attrac- 
tive and meritorious advertisement appear- 
ing in the December (Christmas) number. 
This number will be a particularly bright and 
attractive one and the contest should awaken 
advertisers generally to take space in this 
number and to strive for an ad. of excep- 
tional merit. First prize will be awarded 
for the most meritorious advertisement re- 
gardless of space it occupies — winning ad- 
vertisement getting six free insertions in the 
next six following issues, each insertion 
occupying same amount of space as was 
used in the competing advertisement. 
Second prize will be four free insertions, 
and third prize, two free insertions. The 
contest is announced well in advance in 
order to give advertisers sufficient time to 
prepare attractive advertising for this issue. 

It is worth the while for any advertiser to 
try for some free advertising that is good, 
clean and profitable. 

The publishers offer advertisers the benefit 
of yearly rates for a single insertion in this 
number. 

To the Connecticut family of Aliens be it 
known that the " Society of Descendants of 
Walter Allen " has been incorporated under 
the laws of Massachusetts. It has been 
organized " to further historical and gene- 
alogical research, preserve family records and 
strengthen family ties." The entrance fees 
and yearly dues are merely nominal. The 
officers of the society are Prest. Walter Allen, 
New Haven, Ct.; Vice-Presidents, Wm. 
Henry Allen of Boston, Mass., Louis Has- 
brouck of Ogdensburg, N. Y., and Frederick 
E. Allen of Turner's Falls, Mass. ; Secretary, 
J. Weston Allen of Boston ; Treasurer, R. E. 
Allen of Shrewsbury Mass. ; Historian, Allen 
H. Bent of Boston. The projenitor of the 
family, Walter Allen, settled in Newbury, 
Essex Co., Mass., about 1640, but a few years 
later moved to Watertown Farms, now the 
town of Weston, in the adjoining county of 
Middlesex. His descendants soon scattered, 
many being among the early settlers of 
Worcester, Co., Mass., and two at least went 
early to Connecticut — Ebenezer to Stoning- 
ton and Samuel to what is now Montville. 
So many were the Aliens among the early 
settlers of New England that the task of 
locating their descendants is daily increasing 



: M>^&^ 



^tzAAy- 



#.30ro7£. 
Z30ro<? 



10* 







4 




TAKE ELEVATOR. 






Connecticut 

Magazine 

Announcement. 

Qiristmas 
Number 

BRIM FULL OF ENTER- 
TAINING MATTER. 

Read Publisher's Notes and 
Potpourri in this Issue. 

Don't Miss 
The Christmas 
Number. 



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GIVEN to our READERS. 

4 'Picturesque Connecticut." 



•z? 



O doubt many of our readers would 
like a copy of " Picturesque Connec- 
ticut ' ' a handsome thirty- two page 
book just published by The Connecticut Maga- 
zine Company presenting a collection of Con- 
necticut views that is seldom equalled. Let 
us tell you how to possess it. 

Notice that the page opposite is divided 
into ten squares, each numbered consecu- 
tively, marked Connecticut Magazine Pur- 
chase Slip, containing blank space to be 
filled out. We ask our readers to cut out 
these slips separately then look over the ad- 
vertising pages of the January, February, 
March, April, May, June, July and August 
September and October numbers of this 
year. If you have a purchase to make try 
to patronize those whose ads. appear in 
our columns. They are reliable houses 



or we would not carry their ads. With 
each purchase you make, present one of these 
slips for the signature or stamp of the ad- 
vertiser. 

If you purchase by mail, enclose one of the 
slips with order, and request the advertiser 
to fill it out and return. 

To any one returning five slips, properly 
signed, to The Connecticut Magazine office, 
we will present this handsome thirty-two 
page book. The book will be a credit to any 
home, and will bring out the most attractive 
scenic features of our state. 

£^This offer will apply to purchases made 
of any advertiser using space in the columns 
of The Connecticut Magazine during the 
months of January, February, March, April, 
May, June, July or August, 1899. 

MORAL: 



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helping US to give YOU a good 
magazine. 

SEE OPPOSITE PAQE.^- 



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The Connecticut Magazine offers the 
services of its artist and designer in 
helping its advertisers construct 
proper and attractive advertisements. 

Magazine advertisements will per- 
mit of illustration in half-tone or line 
work on account of the superior 
quality of the paper used. 

To advertisers taking a six month's 
contract we will make an appropriate 
design and submit to advertiser for 
approval ; make a half-tone or line 
printing; plate — and write the adver- 
tisement if it is desired : Cut to be 
property of owner at expiration of 
contract. This all free of charge in 
order to bring the advertiser the best 
possible results and to make our 
advertising pages attractive. 

THE 

CONNECTICUT 

MAGAZINE. 



ALL 

POPULAR 

MUSIC 



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Less Than 

HALF PRICE. 

SENT TO ANY ADDRESS on receipt of 
price as above and 2c. stamp. 

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163 Asylum Street. Hartford, Conn. 



WANTED 



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4 of Vol. 4, of 

THE CONNECTICUT 
QUARTERLY, 

For which we will pay a Reason- 
able Price. 

The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 



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No. 3 CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE 
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To assist the publishers of The Connecti- 
cut Magazine in obtaining addresses ot per- 
sons who are natives of, or have an interest 
in Connecticut matters, we ask those of 
our readers, who have relatives or friends 
who are not subscribers, to fill out as many 
such names and addresses as possible on 
the blanks below, cut out and mail to The 
Connecticut Magazine office. On receipt of 
same we will refund whatever postage was 
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POTPOURRI.— Continued. 

in difficulty. Consequently any one believ- 
ing himself to be a descendant of the above 
is invited to put himself in communication 
with the Society. Allen H. Bent, 22 Williams 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Sometime ago the following with the 
appended comment had the attention of 
our state papers. Though a little late it 
may be well to print it again, that we forget 
not all the doings of our legislators. 

"The long-looked for bill for pocket knives, 
fountain pens, pocketbooks, albums, etc., for 
senators and representatives, which has at 
last been filed with the comptroller and paid, 
under an order of the Connecticut legislature, 
is an interesting document. The senate's 
bill is $1,689.29, an average of $70.38 for 
each senator. The house bill is $2,353.71, 
an average of $9.34 for each representative. 
The astounding fact is clear, that the house 
had two oak desks with chairs, charged at 
$88, the total. And the senate had one with 
chair, charged at $68. The "lamp and 
shade, $r5," probably went with it. None of 
these desks are now in the possession of the 
state. The Swan fountain pens furnished the 
senate averaged $3.77 each, or a total of 
$347.30. Besides these, nine gold pens and 
holders were furnished, at a cost of $25.10; 
average, $2.79. The 215 pocketknives— 215 
between 24 men! — cost $618.64. The 27 
photograph albums in which the senators 
preserved each other's photographs cost 
$5 each, or $135. The house had 372 
Swan fountain pens costing $915.25, yet 
there are only 252 representatives, and in 
addition one gold pen and holder at $2.75. 
It had 608 pocket-knives, at a cost of 
$775.42, 17 pocketbooks with markings at 

$65.75. 

It is to be hoped that next year the state 
will look out more carefully for the interests 
and comfort of her law makers. A house 
and lot would not perhaps be a bad thing to 
throw in with the pocketknives, et cetera, 
and if free passes to all the soda fountains in 
th£ capital city could be issued it is to be 
presumed that the members of the legislature 
would find life worth the living for a few 
years more. Certainly the state ought not 
to stop at such a small thing as a pocket 
knife." 

TO CUKE A COLD IN ONE DAY. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. 
All druggists refund the money if it fails to 
cure. 25 cents. 



'FRUITERS' 

>IIIEe^aJT , 




A Weekly Paper Devoted to the Agriculturist 
in all matters pertaining to the 



HORSE, 
COW, 



POULTRY, 




CREAMERY. 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year. 
From date to Jan. J, 1900, 25 cents. 
SPECIAL OFFER— From date to Jan. J, 
J90J,$J.OO. 

Send for Sample Copy. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



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A BRIGHT BOY OR GIRL 



CAN SECURE ANY OF OUR 

SELECT PREMIUMS 

by sending us five (5) new yearly subscriptions to The Connecticut! 
Magazine at $1.00 each. 

Sendjin each subscription as it is taken and we will give you due credit for each. On the 
remittance of the fifth we will mail you postpaid your choice of any one of the premiums below. 



EITHER OF THESE 

Handsome and Useful Ingersoll Watches* 





Nickel or gilt, stem wound and stem 
set, and WARRANTED for one year. 
If the watch is not what we guarantee 
it to be we will replace it by another. 
Your choice of either pocket watch or 
the new bicycle watch and attach- 
ment. Watch can be attached to handle bar of any wheel at a 
moment's notice. 

Your Choice— Fa motis Arms Pocket Books* 





Fine Morocco Ladies Focket 
Book with card pocket. Specie 
pocket, three extra pockets with 
button locks ; card pocket with 
tuck. 



Fine Morocco Combination 
Safety Purse and Pocket-Book. 
Strongly made in neat and at- 
tractive styles, and adapted for 
gentlemen's or ladies' use. 

Three pockets ; double lock. 



mm 



bC 



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Address THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn, 



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A Gift to Our Patrons. 

Pictures of Dames of Colonial Days. 

ABSOLUTELY FREE. 



The advent of the Twentieth Century joyously heralds an 
era of prosperity— the greatest in our national history. 

The example of the patriotic and heroic people of the past 
is ever an incentive to future generations to the emulation of 
true ardor; and while we take pride in the achievements of men 
who, by their efforts made it possible for us to keep alive the 
spirit of patriotism, we should not forget their brave com- 
panions, who shrank not from labor or sacrifice in gaining tor 
us the blessed inheritance which we now enjoy. What mo-e 
interesting subject, therefore, can we present to our friends than 
the women of Colonial Days ? 

An exquisitely artistic calendar, as a souvenir of 1900, has 
been prepared by us for our patrons, free of cost. On each of 
its four pages appear the picture of a dame, New York being 
clad in the lively Dutch costume; Pennsylvania in the sedate 
gray garb of the Quaker; Massachusetts in the austere Puritan 
attire and Virginia in the rich Elizabethian dress. 

Lack of space in a brief circular precludes an extended 
description or close criticism of these four beautiful portraits. 
Suffice to say. that each is a rich gem within itself. 

A brief history of each colony accompanies the pictures; 
and a calendar for each of the seasons is most exquisitely 
wrought. 

This beautiful work has been copyrighted, and it cannot be 
purchased at any store or elsewhere. To each of our patrons 
desiring a copy/ the same will be mailed free on reeeipr of 
three of our shell trade mark desigis, cut from the front of the 
cartons or wrappers enclosing the bottles of our Extracts. 

The number of these calendars has been limited, and the 
coupons may be sent at any time between now and the 25th of 
next December. The souvenir will be forwarded in the order 
of reception of coupons recorded, and those anxious for the 
early copy will do well to bear closely in mind the purport ot 
the old maxim, " First come, first served." 

Address, 

Baker Extract Co., Springfield, Mass 




Laugh ! 
Laugh ! 

The 

Graphophone 
Produces — 

Fan, Music, Wit, 

Monologue, 

Dialogue. 

An Endless 

Variety of Enter = 

tainment. 




Write for 
Catalogue. 




LISTEN TO THAT RECOKO ! 



Hartford Graphophone Co., 

80 Trumbull St., HARTFORD, CONN. 
EDWIN T. NORTHAM, Manager. 



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Vol. V. 



December, 1899. 



No. 12. 






JHE 



1899 



T 




CHRISTMAS 
fi'UMBER ■ j3 



$1.00 a Year. HARTFORD, CONN. 10 cts. a Copy. 




Paid up Capital $1,000,000.00 



RAVELERS 



NSURANCE 



All 



of 
hartford, 

CONN. 



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JAMES G.BATTERSON, PRESIDENT 



INSURE 
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the T ravelers, 

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OLDEST, 
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ACCIDENT INSURANCE 



OF ALL FORMS. 



HEALTH POLICIES 



INDEMNITY FOR DISABILITY CAUSED 
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LIABILITY INSURANCE "ZgZZZZ 



Owners of Buildings, Horses, and Vehicles, can all be protected by policies 
in THE TRAVELERS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



PAID-UP GASH CAPITAL $1000000.00 
ASSETS, 26499,822.74 



LIABILITIES, 
EXCESS, ty*% BASIS 



$22,708 701.82 

3.791,120.92 



GAINS: 6 Months, January to July, 1899. 
In Assets, $1,184,380.28 Increase in Reserves (both depts), $1,478,549.62 



S. C. DUNHAM, Vice-President. 
JOHN E. MORRIS Secretary. 



H J. MESSENGER, Actuary. 

E. V. PRESTON, Sup't of Agencies. 



iSS 



A 



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THE 



Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



DECEMBER, \ 899. 



Vol. V. 



CONTENTS. 



No. J2. 



Rev. John Davenport. From an old print. 

Haddam since the Revolution. Illustrated. 

Menunketesette River. Poem. 

A Christmas Litany. Poem. 

Extracts from the Diary of Dr. Mason F. Cogswell. 

Inspiration. Poem. 

The Treasure of the Money Ponds. Story. 
The Old House. Poem. Illustrated. 
The Town of New Haven. Illustrated. 
At the Year's End. Illustrated. 
Departments.— Historical Notes. 
Editorial. 



(Frontispiece.) 


Eveline Warner Brainerd, 


591 


Ellen Brainerd Peck, 


604 


Henry Rutgers Remsen, 


605 


III. Illustrated, 




Compiled by Ellen Strong Bartlett, 


606 


Herbert Randall, 


614 


William Allen Wilbur, 


615 


Anna M. Tutlle, 


625 


George H. Ford, 


627 


Elizabeth Alden Curtis, 


643 




645 




650 



George C. Atwell, ) 
H. Phelps Arms, J 



Edward B. Eaton, Business Manager. 



All communications should be addressed to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, Conn. Remittances 
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promptly acknowledge by postal card all subscriptions received by mail. When change of address is desired give 
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credentials. 



$1.00 a Year. THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. JO Cents a Copy. 

Published at 66 State St., Hartford, Conn, by The Connecticut Magazine Co. 



Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn, as mail matter of the second-class. 



Iwo Great Money- M aking Propositions 

Dividends from 25 per cent* to 50 pet cent* 




The New England Zinc & Lead Companies, Properties, Joplin Mo, 
Output of This Famous District, Over $1,500,000 per Month. 

We have been offering within the past few mouths some very remarkable stocks, but none of 
them begun to have the promise of the New England Zinc & Lead Co. One Zinc Stock sold by 
us at $5.00 a share a few weeks ago is paying dividends of 1% per cent, a month and the price 
has advanced to $12.00. Another stock sold by us has doubled in price aud is paying 3 per cent, 
a month. We are offering New England Zinc Stock at $5.00 a share. The Property is already 
earning 25 per cent, with only half the Property as yet being worked. An increase in Dividends 
and also in price of shares will soon follow. 



40,000 Shares of Gold Placer Stock to be Sacrificed to Close an Estate. 




One of the Great Gold Producing Properties of the United States. 
Dividends of 50 per cent* Confidently Expected* 

40,000 Shares of Stock in the Salmon River Placer Co. have been placed with us to sell at 50 cents a share, Par 
Value One Dollar. This is no price for this Stock but must be sold to close an Estate. After expending many thousands 
of dollars and two years hard work, within one month from this time the Company will be washing out the gold at the 
rate according to mining experts of over 1000 yards per day, with gold averaging at lowest estimate $1.00 per cubic yard. 
It is predicted this Stock will sell at $5.00 a share within a few months and pay at least 50 per cent, dividends. 

For further particulars— Address 

L* E. PIKE & CO., Bankers, Ballerstein Building, Hartford, Conn. 

Phoenix Building, Springfield, Mass. 



References as to our Standing 



First National Bank, Hartford, Conn. 
First National Bank, Springfield, Mass 




\M (UPTAIMS 



Home, Sweet Home* 



U 



ET THE TRUTH of the old adage, "There's no place like Home/' 
be given more force, by adding to the charms of your home 
interiors for the happy occasion of Christmas. 
It is our business to attend to such improvements as are needed to 
embellish the home atmosphere in the way of 

Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Downy Pillows, 
Lace Curtains, Turkish or Domestic Rugs, 
Carpets, Art Squares, Ottomans, Etc. 



The above, offers suggestions for gifts as well as for improving your 
own home. 

Our extensive assortments and our prices make it a pleasure to buy here. 



W|OW% 



SAGE-ALLEN BLDG. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



The Hartford 



Joseph R. Haw ley. 
Charles Dudley Warner. 
Charles Hopkins Clark. 
Arthur L. Goodrich. 
Frank S. Carev. 



Courant 



1764 



1899 



One hundred and thirty-five years of honorable continuous service. 

Gives all the news fit for publication, and tells it in a careful and intelligent 
manner. 

The current topics of the day are treated in its editorial columns with fairness 
and force. 



Aflpan NT^wcnanpr ~ " The Courant is the favorite newspaper 
^lCd.11 IMCWb^ajJCl. with peQple re p rese nting the best stan- 
dards of New England life, and it has 
the respect of all. Its advertising columns have helped others — they can help you. 



The First to Start— IT STILL LEADS 



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A PROMINENT ADVERTISER 

making a list of New Haven's BEST News- 
papers. Two Points will be noted:— 

The List is Small and the Adver- 
tiser is Old and Experienced. 



Compare The Evening Leader, page by page, 
day by day with any other New Haven newspaper and 
you will realize it is the favorite publication of the 
"Elm City. 

It carries the display announcements of over three 
hundred local business men to the exclusion of any 
other publication. 

It is the only newspaper maintaining branch 
offices in the suburbs for the benefit of its patrons. 



Evening Leader Bldg. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Harold Wendell Phillips 

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THE MAN WITH THE HOE 




should be " up-to-date" in matters relating to the farm. A 
good Agricultural paper gives the latest improvements in 
farming implements and the best and most economical 
methods of tilling the soil. 

The Connecticut Farmer does this, pacing more 
particular attention to the needs of the farmers of this, state. 

Our Tobacco Department gives a complete resume of all 
the news ot interest to the tobacco grower, also many 
articles on the most improved methods. 

We have a very complete Grange page, giving the 
freshest news from the various Granges. 

Our subscription price is only $1.00 a year, free for the 
remainder of 1899 to new sub.-cribers. Trial subscription 
of three months. 25 cents. A postal will bring you a sample 
copy. 




HARTFORD, CONN. 



No 

Matter 

What 

your politics may be you'll laugh to 
44 split your sides " over JUDGE during 
the campaign of J 900. JUDGE has 
politics in pictures for the politician, 
humor for the humorist, and all-around 
good-natured satire for everybody. 
JUDGE'S cartoons are features of every 
political contest that a good American 
should not miss. 

JUDGE is published weekly and is 
to be found the world over. It is sold 
at 10 cents per copy, or by the year 
at $5.00. 

Remember, please, that 

Judge is 
the Prince of 
Caricaturists 



The Readers 
We have— 
We hold ! 



This is an age of education. No other nation on fti e 
face of the globe is so intelligent as ours, and 
intelligence makes a nation prosperous and 
happy. Education gives a young man the best 
chance in life. The easiest and cheapest way to 
educate yourself and your children, irrespective of 
the schools and colleges, is by having the best 
current reading in your house. 



THE GREATEST FAMILY NEWSPAPER IS 

Leslies Illustrated Weekly. 

It tells the story of contemporaneous events and illustrates it with the most 
artistic pictures. He who reads it every week learns to recognize the counte- 
nances of the noblest men and women in public and 
in private life; the appearance of the world's most 
famous places, and the* scenes of the greatest historic 
interest. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY is a paper to keep on the 
library table, and to read and reread, and to file away 
for useful reference. It is read by more families of 
culture and refinement among the masses than any 
other paper of its class in the world. It is the greatest, 
best, most attractive and cheapest of all American 
educators. 

It is for sale everywhere — on the stands, in the 
) bookstores, on all trains, at 10 cents per copy. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY, no Fifth Avenue, New York. 

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The practical side of science 
is reflected, in : : : 

THE PATENT 
RECORD 

A monthly publication of inestimable 
value to the student of every-day 
scientific problems, the mechanic, the 
industrial expert, the manufacturer, 
the inventor — in fact, to every wide- 
awake person who hopes to better his 
condition by using his brains. 
& The inventor, especially, will find 
in The Patent Record a guide, 
philosopher and friend. Nothing of 
importance escapes the vigilant eyes 
of its corps of expert editors. Every- 
thing is presented in clean, concise 
fashion, so that the busiest may take 
time to read and comprehend. The 
scientific and industrial progress of 
the age is accurately mirrored in the 
columns of The Patent Record, 
and it is the only publication in the 
country that prints the official news 
of the Patent Office and the latest 
developments in the field of inven- 
tion without fear or favor. It is 
independent of patent attorneys and 
shows favoritism to none. 

Subscription Price — One Dollar per Year. 

The Patent Record, 

Baltimore, MdL 




Alfred 
Barrington. 

Vocal 
Teacher 

Cheney Bldg., 
Htfd., Conn. 



FRANK H. ROWLEY, 

JOINER and JOBBER, 

Estimates Gladly Given and Work Guaranteed. 

Shop, Rear 190 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Residence, 27 Sargeant Street. 

WANTED.... 

A limited number of No's 3 and 4 of Vol. 2, and Nos. 
3 and 4 of Vol. 4, of The Connecticut Quarterly, for wnich 
we will pay a Reasonable Price. 
THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn. 



♦♦American Homes*. 



H X^ 




Vj-3':" ;• 



JB^«^\<^ : : 



The purpose of this magazine is to aid those I 
who wish to Plan, Build or Beautify Homes 

according to modern ideas without technicality 
or shop-talk. Elegant, but practical. 



A Connecticut Man Said, " $1.00 

put into your magazine is a mighty good investment." 



We send it 12 mos. tor $1.00, and if you would like a full set 
— 4 vols.— of Marian Harland's "Common Sense Series," 
gratis, say so when you send the $, or. if you prefer it, you 
can have a book of house Desiens — FREE. If you want 
PRACTICAL ideas in home affairs, Decorations, Arrange- 
ment, Etc., American Homes will interest, instruct and 
satisfy you. Single copies at newsdealers. 10 cents. 

American Homes, 19 Conn. Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 



Two 

famous 

pictures 

printed in ten colors, ready for 
framing, will be given free to any 
person who will send a quarter for 
Three Months' subscription to 
Demorest's Family Magazine, the 
great paper for home life. Thou- 
sands subscribe for Demorest's as 
a gift to their daughters. Demo- 
/^ rest's is the great 

■ " i4*t S*± J~kk American authori- 
al I t~C~ *yo n Fashions. For 
*■ A* ^^^^ forty years it has 
been read in the 
best families of America, and has 
done more to educate women in 
true love of good literature than 
any other magazine. The special 
offer of these two great pictures 
and Three Months' subscription to 
Demorest's for 25c. is made for 60 
days only. 

"Write at once, 

Demorest's Family Magazine, 

Art Department, 
1J0 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



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Brightest and Best 



If you want a newspaper that makes a specialty of 
Connecticut news and also contains all the general news 
of the day — buy the REGISTER. It is clean and bright 
and in every way an ideal paper for the home. It is 
the largest and best newspaper in the largest city in 
Connecticut. 



New Haven Evening Register. 
New Haven Sunday Register. 



Cut out this Coupon 

If you are not a subscriber to the ^ra I 
Register and live over 25 miles from Jm I 
New Haven we will accept this coupon ^r ' 
and $5.00 for a year's subscription to the Kvening 
Register, or this coupon and $2.00 for a year's 
subscription to the Sunday Register. 



ADDRESS 



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A Connecticut Paper 
for Connecticut Readers 



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The Connecticut Agricultural College* 

" Ignorance is the curse of God, 

Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven." 

One writer has said, " The college is a bond which joins the present to the past. For us 
ancestry has labored. Ignorance supports iniquitous and oppressive political systems. Popular 
education, inspired by the college, is the one invincible foe of special privilege and political 
absolution. Liberal culture not only proclaims republican equality, but \*orks out the practical 
elevation of the lowly. 






M\ si it 





Self-government is a 
government by a nation 
of readers, thinkers, and 
debaters." 

In these terse sen- 
tences will be found the 
object in full for which 
The Connecticut Agri- 
cultural College has been 
founded by the state, to 
which, at any time, all 
students of both sexes 
over fifteen years of age 
are admitted to such 
classes as they are found 
qualified to enter. 



The fall term will close Wednesday, December 20th, followed by the holiday recess till 
January 2, 1900. A short course in Dairying will be given, including such subjects as Feeding 
Animals, Butter Making, Breeds and Breeding, Selection of the Dairy Cow, Milk-Testing, 
Pasteurization, &c. 

FOR INFORMATION AND CATALOGUES, 

Address GEORGE W. FLINT, President, Storrs, Conn. 



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I Werners t 
j Dictionary * 



OF 



AND 



SYNONYMS 
ANTONYMS 



No two words in the 
English Language 
have exactly the 
same significance. 
To express the pre- 
cise meaning that 
one intends to convey, 
a Dictionary of 
Synonyms is needed 
in order to avoid 
repetition. 



WERNER'S 

Dictionary 



SYNONYMS 
ANTONYMS 
MYTHOLOdY 
hd FAMILIAR 
PHRASES . 




The strongest figure 
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In WERNER'S 
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and 
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Words and Phrases, Persons, Places, Pictures, Buildings, Streets and Monuments frequently 
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Including Sentences and Quotations from both Living and Dead Languages. 

HEROES and HEROINES of PROSE and POETRY— 

A Compendium of the Celebrated Characters in the Literature of the World. 

DICTIONARY of HUSICAL TERMS, DATES, ABBREVIATIONS, Etc., concluding 
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REV. JOHN DAVENPORT. 
(From an engraving in Trumbull's History.) 



The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. j. 



December, 1899. 



No. 12. 



HADDAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



BY EVELINE WARNER BRAINERD. 



WHAT is known to-day as " the old 
meeting house," built soon after 
the Revolution, was so truly for the suc- 
ceeding fifty years the centre of the town 
life, that it seems a fitting point from 
which to begin an account of Haddam's 
second century. It was planned before 
the division of the original society into 
the three of Haddam, Higganum and 
Haddam Neck. Boatloads of parishion- 
ers then came across the river and tramped 
through the meadows. Ox teams brought 
families from Johnson's Lane near Dur- 
ham and from Turkey Hill near Killing- 
worth. In the sketch of the First Con- 
gregational Church, written by the present 
pastor, Mr. Lewis, there is a charming 
description of the structure. It stood at 
the head of Haddam street, crowning a 
hill • surrounded by buttonballs ; "a. 
stately building," of the dignified style of 
the time. Three stone steps, leading to 
the green on which it stood are all that 
now remain. Nothing of the building has 
this generation seen, save a few bits of the 
decorations, the "cookies," as the chil- 
dren called the mouldings that softened 
the terrors of the sounding board. It is 

59i 



an increasing regret that with the changes 
in the church body, it was deemed wisest 
to leave the old building. 

The present church, finished in 1847, 
is pleasant and convenient, and it may be 
but the glamour of the past that makes 
the departed structure seem the more 
precious. In the old church it was that 
Watt's Psalms and Spiritual Songs were 
lined off, and the tuning fork held its final 
sway. There sounded the clarionet, the 
bass viol and the fiddle. To the old 
church, on the death of Mr. May in 1803, 
came David Dudley Field, whose des- 
cendants figure in every history of Ameri- 
can jurisprudence, literature or enter- 
prise. Dr. Field held three pastorates 
in the town, two to the original church, 
from 1804 to 1818 and from 1836 to 
1844, when he became the pastor of the 
church then newly formed at Higganum. 
During all these twenty-seven years Dr. 
Field's efforts for the town were enthusi- 
astic and effective, and his interest in the 
place and the people to which his earliest 
and his latest labors were given is evinced 
not alone in the faithfulness of his pasto- 
ral work, but in his three volumes con- 



592 



H ADD AM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



cerning the region ; " History of Middle- 
sex County," " History of the Towns of 
Haddam and East Haddam," and the 
"Brainerd Genealogy." Among those of 
his children born in Haddam, were 
David Dudley, the eminent jurist ; Step- 
hen, long senior justice of the Supreme 
Court ; Matthew, who bore an important 
share in the successful laying of the first 
cable ; and Emilia, whose son., Mr. Jus- 
tice Brewer, sat with his uncle, on the 
Supreme bench at Washington. 




CONGREGATION A L CHURCH, HADDAM. 

The unpainted walls of the dwelling 
which the Fields first occupied, and in 
which David Dudley Field, Jr., was born, 
stood until five years ago, opposite the 
present schoolhouse. Further up the 
street was the second home, a square 
white house, built by Dr. Field, the site 
of which is yet made beautiful by the elms 
set out by the preacher. On Dr. Field's 
return for his second pastorate, he went 
to the new parsonage, beside the meeting 
house, the building noted in village an- 



nals as the result of the "cold water 
raisin'." In those days, neighbors gath- 
ered to put up the frames of buildings. 
The labor was made the occasion for 
merrymaking and New England rum fig- 
ured in the entertainment. The parson- 
age was built for Dr. John Marsh, the 
clergyman between the two pastorates of 
Dr. Field. Dr. Marsh was famous as a 
pioneer in the temperance movement that 
later swept over the country. No rum 
could be expected at the "raisin' " of his 
parsonage, and many were the prophesies 
that the timbers would never be in place 
on such terms. The staunch minister won 
however and no stouter building faces the 
street to-day, than that of the " Ma'sh 
place." 

Some twenty years ago, the four sons 
of Dr. and Mrs. Field, proposed a memo- 
rial for their parents. A park was contem- 
plated on the site of the church where 
their father had preached, and below the 
parsonage, but the space was small and 
finally, not only that was bought, but 
also a larger tract opening in the centre 
of the village and running behind the 
"Brainerd Academy," in the founding and 
success of which, Dr. Field was deeply 
interested. Drives wind through the 
grounds. Young trees and shrubs mingle 
with the veteran growth that stood in the 
pasture lots before the park was planned. 
Frowning on the village, Isinglass Hill 
rises from the midst of the lawns. Toward 
the street, great boulders make its end a 
cliff. Behind the Academy, its steep 
side rises, clothed in dark undergrowth 
and slender trees that reach upward for 
the sunlight. On its summit two ragged 
pines keep watch. Every child of the 
town has gathered mica from the loose 
stones of its steep pathway and has crept 
to the edge to peer venturesomely over 
the ledges. Each, when older grown, has 
returned to look on the serene sweep of 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



593 



the river, the low, velvety island, and the 
distant hills as this height shows them ; to 
pick out from the mass of tree tops, the 
peaks of familiar houses and recognize by 
the grey stone hall, the ancient elms, the 
three graces of Haddam. 

It was on one of the brightest of late 
October days that the famous brothers 
came back to the home of their boyhood, 
to give to the town the two beautified 
stretches of ground " to be kept as pleas- 



The New Lights, or Separatists, as they 
were first termed, formed the Baptist 
church of Shailerville. The Methodist 
church of Haddam centre originated in 
the "class "at Chapman's ferry, Shailer- 
ville, in 1815. The services have been 
many years discontinued, its last pastor, 
Rev. Henry Eurton, being the grandfather 
of Connecticut's true poet, Richard Bur- 
ton. At Haddam Neck, Ponset and 
Higganum, the denomination has build- 








REV. DR. AND MRS. DAVID DUDLEY FIKLD. 



ure grounds for the people of Haddam in 
all time to come." David Dudley Field 
had delivered great speeches before great 
audiences, but never words more eloquent 
than were the few spoken on this seventy- 
fifth anniversary of his parents' marriage, 
"to those and the descendants of those 
whom they loved and among whom they 
dwelt." 

From the one of early times the church 
organizations in the town have increased 
to nine with Swedish services at intervals. 



ings and is well represented. Started as 
a Sunday School in the home of Mr. Wm. 
C. Knowles, the present rector, the Epis- 
copal church in eastern Ponset is now 
housed in a pleasant little structure and 
forms a needed center for the scattered 
households of the region. A Roman 
church building has been erected at the 
entrance of Higganum street. The Con- 
gregational church of Higganum, a plain 
white edifice, crowns Big Hill, whence the 
surrounding slopes of lawn and pasture and 



594 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



forest spread in a wide picture, and from 
the crest of which upper Higganum seems 
tumbled, willy nilly, into the hollow at its 
feet. The little white church of Haddam 
Neck turns its back on the world across 
the river in order to face its village street. 
There is not a point whence the Neck can 
be seen that does not show the tiny spire 
facing unsociably to the east, with no sign 
of excuse, for the Neck, from the west, 
looks one steep hillside with here and 
there a farm house set in woods. The 
longest of recent pastorates, however, 
have been in the original society and no 




THK Ol^D FIEIvD PLACE. 
(Birthplace of David Dudley Field, 

account of the town is complete that does 
not mention these. Mr. Cook, known in 
theologic circles for his " Theory of the 
Moral System " and " Origin of Evil," 
served some few years after the division 
of the society. Later came Mr. James L. 
Wright, the beloved pastor, in memory of 
whose sixteen years of beautiful service, 
the present communion table was given. 
In 187 1, on the death of Mr. Wright, 
succeeded Mr. Everett E. Lewis, whose 
earnest endeavor for the welfare of the 
town has been through all these eight and 
twenty years as unflagging as it has been 
broad minded, thoughtful and devoted. 



Efforts for a town library were made as 
early as 1791, when a library society was 
formed. This was short lived but twenty- 
five years later a literary society owned 
eighty volumes. Other attempts to col- 
lect books have left traces in odd volumes 
bearing the marks of the different clubs, 
remnants of these small gatherings being 
now included in the twelve hundred books 
of the present free library. Originally 
the Association having the care of the 
library charged a fee of one dollar a year 
for its use. Since this fee was dropped, 
the circulation of the books has increased 
tenfold, but all support 
must now come from 
gifts, and the funds are 
at present nearly ex- 
hausted. Aside from the 
amount needed yearly 
(one hundred dollars) 
the collection has out- 
grown its present quar- 
ters and a building for its 
accommodation, making 
possible also a reading 
room, is the dream of 
those interested. 

In ripping an old 
needle case, recently, 
the stiffening was found 
to be ancient ball invitations. One card 
decorated at the top by an olive branch 
and the word "Peace" reads: " Miss 
Zeruiah Brainerd is requested to honor 
the company with her attendance at the 
Ball at N. & J. Brainerd's Hall on Wednes- 
day the 1st March, 181 5, at three o'clock, 
afternoon." The windows of " N. & J. 
Brainerd's Hall " still look down on the 
village street from between the heavy 
hemlock boughs. The house, now that of 
Mr. G. A. Dickinson, is a fine specimen 
of the hip roof looking to-day as staunch 
and comfortable as on that March after- 
noon when its walls echoed to the figure 



Jr.) 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



595 



calls of Hull's Victory and the Virginia 
Reel. Another of the cards has this 
more elegant legend 

"Anniversary Ball. 

"The compliments of the Mana- 
gers are respectfully proffered to Miss 
Zeruiah Brainerd, Soliciting her attendance 
at the Ballroom of Daniel Smith on Tues- 
day the 4th of July at 5 o'clock P. M. 

"Haddam, 28 June 1815." 

Probably what is known as the old 
Smith house, below the school of the 
centre district, was the tavern of Daniel 
Smith, though no signs of such use remain ; 
but, two doors further down the street, 
stands a plain, peaked roofed dwelling, 
where in Revolutionary days, was a tavern, 
and here is still to be seen the bar window, 
such as is often still in use in English 
inns. At the upper end of the street, 
close upon the turnpike in its days of 
prosperity, but now, by the laying of the 
new road over Walkley Hill, left stranded 
in the fields, is the last of these hotels. 
Its front is weather worn, its roof and cor- 
nice show their age, but dreariest of all, 
from the upper story of the long ell, the 
four windows of the assembly room, show 
melancholy, never opened shutters to the 
passers by. With the coming of the rail- 
road went the stage lines, and with them 




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the marsh place. 



REV. DR. JOHN MARSH. 

most of the call for such houses of enter- 
tainment, while within the last decade, 
enactment has taken from the town, the 
last encouragement to the business. 

Half the suits for Middlesex County 
before the Superior Court were tried at 
Middletown, half at Haddam, the half- 
shire-town. With the growth of the city 
of Middletown, this arrangement has 
grown more and more irksome to lawyers 
and judges, till it has at length been done 
away. The upper story 
of the stone building, 
standing where the 
turnpike bends sharply 
westward, held the 
room of the Superior 
Court. On the ground 
floor still beats that 
heart of the Republic, 
the town meeting, and 
here, with honesty or 
with dishonor with wis- 
dom or with thought- 
lessness, men settle the 
details of government 



596 



H ADD AM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



and in them, unwittingly, its most far 
reaching measures. But the courtroom 
above, where have spoken the greatest of 
Connecticut's jurists, is deserted. Here, 
full of pranks and raillery, remembered 



among the well known names on the re- 
cords of these sessions. 

A memento of the one execution that 
has shadowed the fair place exists in a 
time browned pamphlet which, one must 




entrance; of fiexd park. 



by his hostess half in admiration, half 
wrathfully, came Brainard, the young poet, 
calling the law his profession. Here came 
John Trumbull whose "McFingal" was 
to touch the nation's sense of humor, and 
here Zephaniah Swift, compiler of the first 
American law treatise, sat as judge. Sen- 
ator Roger S. Baldwin who so magnifi- 
cently defended his State against the 
attack of Senator Mason of Virginia tried 
causes in this room, and one who was then 
a little girl tells how she used to run to the 
window as he passed for a glimpse of his 
fine, white features and stately cariiage ; 
Daggett, last of the top boot and knee 
breeches gentry, Wait, Hosmer and 
Storrs, Chief Justices of the State, were 
familiar figures. Roger M. Sherman, 
Leman Church, and more of recent date, 
McCurdy and LaFayette Foster are 



confess, bespeaks as much of curiosity as 

horror. It is entitled, 

A 

SERMON 

Preached at Haddam, June 14, 1797 

On the day of the 

Execution of 

THOMAS STARR 

Condemned for the murder of his 

Kinsman 

Samuel Cornwall 

By 

and here follows a vivid description of 
the manner of the deed. 

Quarrying, which to the present time 
has been the principal business carried on 
in Haddam centre was begun on the west 
side of the river in 1792 by the brothers 
Nehemiah and General John Brainerd. 
The stone is like that of the Neck and 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



597 



largely used for curbing, paving and 
foundations. In the village the house 
built by some of Mr. Xehemiah Brainerd's 
family, the town hall, the county jail, 
jailer's house and the academy are of the 
finely colored material and prove that it 
would be a satisfactory building stone. 

In 1859 it was. that these brothers who 
had given business to the place gave it 
also its most valued possession, the 
Academy. With the dark side of Isin- 
glass Hill behind, the steep, sunny slope 
to the street before, its grey stones were 
the pride of the place. 
We peer through the 
foliage of heavy trees 
for a glimpse of its 
bare windows. Its 
halls resound to the 
footfalls of the chance 
visitor and the green 
desks stand in mel- 
ancholy order await- 
ing occupants who 
never come. We turn 
away regretfully, feel- 
ing robbed of some 
good thing that our 
fathers enjoyed. 
The catalog ue of 
1 84 1 shows the 
school in its days of 
prosperity. One hundred and eighty. five 
pupils are on the roll, from Massachusetts, 
New York, Pennsylvania and Mississippi, 
as well as from its own state. Its days 
were numbered however, and no faithful- 
ness of teaching could save it. The high 
school was taking the place of all such 
simple private schools. To cam it on as 
is the preparatory school of recent years, 
called for more money than its endow- 
ment furnished, so a fine building stands 
unused and the triumphs and the pranks 
of the students are but stories for the 
reminiscent fireside. 



With the coming of the freight train the 
stone cutters moved to the sand by the 
Shailerville stations, and " General's 
Wharf" lies deserted. Tall elms grow 
from the carpet of stone chips and bits of 
nagging, and the sound of the water lap- 
ping the timbers is no longer mingled with 
the ringing of the hammers. Among the 
hills bluffs of broken stone peer out from 
the young woods and the wanderer comes 
suddenly on old quarries, like amphithea- 
ters, where saplings cling to the roughly- 
hewn seats and steps. Arnold's, on the 




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, HIGGANUM. 



Connecticut Valley Railroad, opened for 
the convenience of the quarries on the 
west of the river, marks the passing of the 
original proprietors. During the owner- 
ship of Mr. Samuel Arnold, the business 
was carried on most successfully, giving 
large employment in the town. Mr. 
Arnold was a man of force and energy. 
For four terms he represented the town in 
the legislature and was a member of the 
thirty-fifth congress, serving on the com- 
mittee on claims. Even a recent change 
of roof line, necessary to modern living, 
cannot rob the Arnold homestead, stand- 



598 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



ing to the west of the Town Hall, of its 
position as the quaintest specimen of the 
old time structure to be found in the 
region. 

Feldspar has been quarried in several 
parts of the town. Lately, in Mr. Gillet's 
quarry on the Neck, have been found 
what jewelers judge the finest of the tour- 
maline in greens, reds, pinks, blues, lilacs, 
lemons, yellows and colorless. The brown, 
green and black tourmaline had been 



back from the main street, an apprentice 
was learning his trade of blacksmithing, 
with the finer work required for the forg- 
ing of sword blades, and judging from the 
after skill of the apprentice, Hezekiah 
Scovil, whatever work was done in the 
little establishment was well done, well 
taught and well learned. When a young 
man Mr. Scovil went to New Haven, and 
there, from Eli Whitney, then a gun man- 
ufacturer for the United States Govern - 




FROM ISINGLASS HII,L, FIELD PARK. 



found in other districts and not far from a 
feldspar bed on the west side of the river 
are these minerals in fine doubly termina- 
ted crystals. The town is known to 
scientists for its deposit of the rare chry- 
soberyl ; but many other uncommon stones 
and more usual minerals in abundance 
make it a Mecca to the mineralogist, and 
specimens from its hills are to be found in 
all the leading museums of the world. 

Near the opening of this century, in a 
shop beside the Ponset road three miles 



ment learned the welding of gun barrels. 
To the north of Cocaponset Brook runs 
another stream and, in the heart of its 
valley rises the round wooded hill, from 
which the hollow takes its name, Candle- 
wood. The steep hillsides now bear elms, 
maples, oaks and tulips, but when the first 
dwellers beside the brook built their rude 
homes, pitch pine clothed the slopes, and 
gave torches and flaring house lamps to 
the new comers. At the head of this tiny 
valley Mr. Scovil built his factory and here, 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



599 



for many years, the principal business was 
the supplying of gun barrels to the various 
government arsenals. By the side of this 
first shop stands the wide brick house of 
the master. The woods are closing in on 
the home, the shop is gone, but the busi- 
ness, brought to its present prosperity by 
the sons who here learned every detail of 
the trade, has stretched further and further 
down the stream till the latest of its series 
of buildings looks on the main street. 
Some time before 1840, Mr. Daniel Scovil, 
travelling in the South was struck with the 
inferiority of the hoes then in use there. 
He proposed to his brother, 
Mr. Hezekiah Scovil, the 
manufacture of a hoe es- 
pecially for the Southern 
market. It seems a com- 
monplace scheme, yet, as 
one drives by the buildings, 
the oldest worn and black- 
ened ; the next, beside a 
pretty pond, the hills rising 
steeply behind its low red 
walls and white cupola ; 
the third group, neat offices 
and packing rooms j the 
fourth and largest, with the 
well known look of the 
busy factory ; all linked by 
wooded stream, smiling 
pond and foaming dam? 
all bearing the marks of slow growth, 
thrift and precise neatness, it is easy to 
read into manufacture the charm of true 
romance. It was thirty years ago that the 
gentle seeming water grew through a long 
storm to a growling flood. The saw-mill 
dam, far up the stream, gave way, and the 
water tore through the valley taking down 
the lesser buildings in its path and carry- 
ing away one life with a frail old structure. 
Since the death in 1881 of Mr. Daniel 
Scovil, the work has been carried on en- 
tirely by Mr. Hezekiah Scovil, the firm 



name remaining. The hoe without those 
methods of introduction and advertising 
now deemed necessary, supplanted the 
poor tools in use at the south and the 
Scovil name on a hoe is a guarantee of its 
worth. An old negro, criticising the tool 
on which he leaned, said to a Haddam 
man, then living at the south, " I wish I 
could git 'nother hoe such ez I hed befo' 
de war. It cum frum de Norf. I dunno 
whar, but it wuz a Scovil an' it was the 
best hoe ever I see." Lately another 
gratuitous compliment has strayed north- 
ward. This comes from the negroes on 




N. & J. BRAINKRD'S HALL. 

a fruit farm. The owner, tried in vain to 
introduce another hoe. " They were 
using the Scovil," he remarked in telling 
of the failure, " I could not get them to 
change." 

Such a manufactory as this of Mr. 
Scovil's, prosaic though its output be, 
should have been the delight of William 
Morris. It bears in every department the 
stamp of personality, to which, in such 
establishments, we are unaccustomed. 
Every part of the work is known accur- 
ately to the chief. In eveiy process he is 



6oo 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



the master workman. His men are trained 
under his eye. He, himself has worked 
out the machinery from its conception to 
its finish. Each autumn Mr. Scovil has 
been wont to spend a day in the woods, 
selecting trees from which to make trip 
hammer handles. Whenever fitting trees 
were found they were bought, the handles 
made and stored till six years should have 
seasoned them to their best estate. Little 
wonder, under management at once so 
detailed and so broad, that the hoe works 
have succeeded. 

Higganum holds another large manu- 
facturing plant ; that for the making of 




THK TOWN HAI.Iy. 



farm machines, and now, principally of 
the "cut-away" harrow. The business has 
been carried on with many fluctuations of 
success for thirty years, in its most pros- 
perous days, employing one hundred and 
fifty men. High among the hills, a short 
distance back of Higganum Hollow, lies 
the reservoir of this company, a pretty 
sheet of water, shut in so naturally by the 
soft slopes, that it would never be thought 
an artificial lake. 

Of lessers attempts at manufacturing, 
there is early mention of tanneries, cotton 
gins, carding machines ; while in late 



years, a button factory on Well's brook, 
cotton and hardware shops in Higganum, 
hardware and steam heater manufactories 
in Shailerville have had shorter or longer 
periods of activity. 

In Haddam as everywhere in Connecti- 
cut the War of 1812 met with cool re- 
sponse. There was one Sunday morning 
of excitement when word was brought 
that the British, whose vessels were gather- 
ing in the Sound, preparatory to the 
blocade of New London, were about to 
attack Essex, fifteen miles down the river. 
General John Brainerd, hearing the news 
on his way to church, galloped down the 
turnpike,in his haste 
forgetting regimen- 
tals and arms. A 
company of Had- 
dam men set brave- 
ly forth, but before 
the militia could 
gather, the ships on 
the Essex stocks 
were burnt, and the 
English soldiers had 
returned to their 
vessel. That was 
the only fighting in 
this section and the 
spot manned at Say- 
brook now bears 
the not complimentary name, Fort Non- 
sense. 

For fifteen years before the outbreak of 
the Civil war, its signs could be seen, 
mingled intricately in the dissensions over 
matters of church, school, temperance and 
local politics. When the final test came, 
nobly did the little town respond. Many 
Haddam men joined the army at New 
Haven or Middletown,but ninety-four en- 
listed directly from the town, fifteen of 
these not living to see peace. One Had- 
dam boy, born in the house beside which 
the Revolutionary troops rested, achieved 



>-^^v-V ii 




HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



60 1 



special distinction in the four years of 
contest. Alexander Shailer was to lead 
the First Brigade of the Sixth Corps that 
saved the day at Marye's Heights ; made 
the famous march to Gettysburg and gave 
men to every battle of the Army of the 
Potomac. General Shailer had served 
eleven years as an officer in the Seventh 
N. Y. and in '61 he was appointed Major 
and stationed at Washington. Soon he 
was made Lieutenant-Colonel of the 65 th 
N. Y., and after the Battle of Marye's 
Heights was promoted to the rank of 
Brigadier-General. With the elevation in 
1865 to the rank of Major-General came 
the commendation "for faithful and meri- 
torious service through the war and es- 
pecially for gallantry in the assualt upon 
Marye's Heights,Fredericsburg, the battles 
of Gettysburg and the Wilderness." Gen- 
eral Shailer has lived much of the time 
since, in New York, where he has held two 
important offices, that of fire commis- 
sioner and president of the board of 
health. 

The historical outline of one New 
England town must needs be very like 





BRAINERD ACADEMY. 



GENERAL JOHN BRAINERD. 

that of its neighbors. Its personality is 
shown by its less prominent incidents and 
by its distinctive features, natural or as 
moulded by man's occupancy. Starting 
near where " Deacon Haule and Nathan 
White found an oak tree by the river 
side," two hundred years ago, one may 
drive on the bluff, close above the river, 
where it spreads like a wide lake after 
pushing past the narrow bend at East 
Haddam. By the pleasant homes of Tyler- 
ville, known to the railroad on account of 
the terminus of the East Haddam ferry, 
as Goodspeeds, one comes into Shailer- 
ville street, Across the fields and the 
water, between the Connecticut and the 
Salmon, spreads the low u Cove Meadow," 
set in a frame of gently sloping hills. 
Above Arnold's Station, the bright faced 
children of the County Home play in 
their grove of oak and chestnut or work 
in their tiny garden spots. Best loved of 
all the glimpses of river and hill that make 
Haddam's street a series of pictures, are 
those that show the Island. It has varied 



602 



HADDAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 




SAMUEL ARNOLD. 

from a mile in length to its present size, 
the tides having added to or stolen from 
either end as suited their pleasure. But 
its charm never wanes and its fringe of 
low bending elms and willows does not 
alter save as the seasons change it from 
youth to age and back to youth once 
more. After one glorious view of the 
river spreading northward till shut in by 
the Narrows below Middletown, Higga- 
num swings behind a hill, out of sight of 
the water and tries to make good the loss 
by showing the prettiest modern places in 
the town. As the square stone marking 
the Haddam and Middletown bound is 
reached, there rises, to the east, across the 
valley of one of New England's " white 
brooks" " Shop-board Rock." It earned 
its name by an incident, which, whether 
true or legendary is worth believing. One 
of Connecticut's governors, living in the 
lower part of the State, being in need of 
clothes, set forth on horseback in search 
of the dilatory Hartford tailor. Between 
Higganum and Middletown, the man of 
State and the man of cloth met, and 



climbing to the top of the great rock, the 
suit was fitted. 

Out from Tylerville, by four miles of 
climbing under interlaced trees by tangled 
undergrowth, between mossed rails and 
broken stone walls, one reaches Turkey 
Hill. The scattered houses seem strangely 
isolated. Far in the distance Haddam 
Neck gives now and then, a touch of 
color to the green landscape. Its little 
church, facing the unseen street, backs 
itself against the world with insistent in- 
dependence. Where one fancies a parting 
between the lines of hill tops, suddenly 
appear, faintly showing against the dis- 
tant background, tips of masts telling that 
at the instant, five miles away, a vessel is 
slipping past the village. Back to Haddam 
one may go down hill all the way, beneath 
another shelter of saplings and forest 
veterans. Mr. David Dudley Field used 




THE ARNOLD HOMESTEAD. 



HAD DAM SINCE THE REVOLUTION. 



603 



to tell how on the sandy brow of a hill a 
mile north of Beaver Brook, he, a bare- 
footed boy, driving cows, met another 
barefooted youngster who called out in 
excitement, "Boney's licked." The news 
of Waterloo had come. 

Choosing one of many drives, one may 
follow the woods to Ponset where the 
meadow land makes a level floor beneath 
the hills. By the hamlet of Burr District 
one reaches Johnson's Lane, and, looking 



closely ranging hills. Here and there,the 
white of some building, strikes against the 
dark foliage assuring that it is not prime- 
val forest stretching on all sides to the 
sky line. By choosing one of Dame For- 
tune's good natured days, the height may 
be gained as the red sun sinks behind 
Candlewood's round top sending a fiery 
glow through the grove of small maples 
that bounds the plateau to the west. 
Hurrying down the opposite slope of 




BIRTHPLACE OF HEZEKIAH SCOV 



from the point beyond the last house, 
gains a grey blue glimpse of the distant 
Sound. But, better than this, one may 
turn from the Ponset Meadow to the 
right up the steep and narrow road that 
leads over Gunger. Stony fields with now 
and then a tiny house where a few flowers 
blossom, make the landscape. The steep- 
est tug of all, lands one on the plateau at 
the summit. Below, on either hand, lie 
the vales of Ponset and of Candlewood. 
Miles to the front, the unseen river parts 



Gunger, straight into the flaming sunset, 
then on through the night of the dark 
wood road, one comes forth at the valley's 
entrance into the softened, many tinted 
lights of the long mid-summer twilight. 
It will linger lovingly while one loiters by 
the narrow meadows under Candlewood, 
till as the street is reached the fading 
brightness gives reluctant place to the 
early moonlight. 

The "forties" drew many Haddam men 
to the Pacific. Others later went to try 



604 



MENUNKETESETTE RIVER. 



the farming of the western lands that make 
these meadows seem but pigmy. The 
cities take the young men to-day. So 
the old roads, here and elsewhere in New 
England, show silent houses and tilled 
ground fast growing wild. The Swedes 
have taken many of the farms, by thor- 
ough, steady labor bringing to mind the 
simple lives of the earlier owners. These 



new comers, perhaps are to bring to the 
township a future of honest, homely toil 
and plain living like to its past or perhaps 
the beauty of the country shall crown the 
hills with summer homes. However this 
shall prove, the past of the township is 
honorable and its present, little known 
though it be, is charming and full of pos- 
sibility. 



MENUNKETESETTE RIVER. 



BY ELLEN BRAINERD PECK. 



Menunketesette, in the hills, 

Welling, is the lucid spring, 
Whence your limpid stream out-spills 

From its chalice, shimmering, 
In a haunt where ferns grow tall, 

And the red-cupped mosses hide, 
Far above the water fall, 

That drops you down the valley side. 

River, I have watch you slip 

Onward, slowly to the sea, 
Where the long, lush sedges dip 

At your edges lissomly, 
So peaceful is it at your side, 

To wander from a world of care, 
To feel the calm of meadows wide, 

And breathe the salt breath of the air. 

A melody there is most blest, 

Greater than man's art can give, 

Lightening the heart's unrest, 

And woes, that fill the life we live, 

Where the winds along the grass, 



O river, by you lowly sing 
A whispered music, as they pass, 
To the grasses answering. 

You are fairest, when the day 

Shows you in the dawning light, 
Twining like a ribbon grey, 

Through the fields, where mists hang 
white, 
Or when on your shifting flow, 

The picture of the new moon lies, 
Wavering, golden, to and fro, 

Where the forest screens the skies. 

At the old bridge, where you swell, 

And give your waters to the deep, 
Some ceaseless harmony you tell 

The restless waves, to which you 
sweep, 
Is it the song, the wood winds sing, 

The croon of breezes on the lea, 
You heard, and followed listening, 

Through wood and meadow to the 
sea? 




A CHRISTMAS LITANY. 



BY HENRY RUTGERS REMSEN. 



Thou wert born this Christmas night. 
Ah, Thy star shone clear and bright ! 
Flood my soul with its pure light, 
Jesu, son of Mary ! 

From Thy cradle low and rude 
In the stable's solitude, 
Bring me Thy beatitude 

Jesu, son of Mary ! 

By Thy dimpled hands in quest 
Of Thy mother's loving breast, 
Hold my heart in quiet rest 
Jesu, son of Mary ! 




4i 



605 



EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF DR. MASON 
FITCH COGSWELL. 



COMPILED FROM ANNOTATIONS OF REV. DR. LEONARD BACON. 



BY KLLEN STRONG BARTLETT. 



PART 111. 



RETURNING to the diary from which 
we have wandered, we find that on 
Tuesday our friend ■' breakfasted with Gen. 
Huntington ; dined at Dr. Lathrop's ; 
drank tea at Mr. Andrew Huntington's ; 
and supped with William Leffingwell," re- 
turn to lodge "at the Governor's." Without 
pausing on the other names here men- 
tioned, some of them notable in history, 
we find our attention arrested by a New 
Haven name, William Leffingwell. Look- 
ing forward we read in the next day's 
record " Dined at William Leffingwell's. 
Mr. L. was my classmate at New Haven. 
We chatted about old matters with much 
pleasure. Joa. sister to William, is a smart 
girl, or I am much out of my conjectures. 
She has a pleasing countenance, an expres- 
sive eye, and possesses good manners. 
Sam'l Huntington and Dan Lathrop were 
likewise of our party. A full grown turkey, 
and more pompion pie, etc., everything in 
nice order." 

Old people remember the time when 
Mr. Leffingwell, residing in the old fash- 
ioned but stately mansion on Chapel 
street at the corner of Temple, with a 
terraced garden which extended half way 
up to College street, was regarded as the 
richest citizen of New Haven. The last 
survivor of his immediate family was Dr. 
606 



Edward H. Leffingwell. One of his 
daughters, Caroline Mary, was the wife of 
Augustus Russell Street ; and the memory 
of her public spirit, as well as his, is per- 
petuated in the edifice and the endowments 
of the School of the Fine Arts, in Yale 
University. 

A grand-daughter of William Leffing- 
well, Caroline Augusta Street, was the wife 
of Admiral Foote ; and thus the old man- 
sion, built by Jared Ingersoll before the 
Revolution, and in later times, the resi- 
dence of Admiral Foote, came to be 
known by the name of the gallant admiral. 

Those who knew Mrs. Leffingwell long 
afterward when she had become a grand- 
mother, and especially those who were 
acquainted with her housekeeping, can- 
not but understand that the supper o 
Tuesday night, and the dinner of Wednes- 
day were not only well got up, "everything 
in nice order," but were enlivened by and 
brightened by her sprightly talk. We may 
be sure that she, the daughter of the famed 
New Haven bookseller, Isaac Beers, and 
from her early girlhood conspicuous 
among the ladies of the college town, 
which did not become a city even in name 
until 1784, had much to say in the pleas- 
ant conversation between her husband and 
her guest, about their college friends and 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



607 



college days. It could not but be a pleas- 
ant party, six at table, all young, four 
gentlemen as well as the hostess over- 
flowing with memories of Yale and New 
Haven, and that " smart girl," Joanna. 
Leffingwell, whose "pleasing countenance" 
retained something of its beauty, and 
whose " expressive eye" had not lost its 
expressiveness, when I knew her, almost 
half a century later, an honored " mother 
in Israel" the widow of Charles (not 
Daniel) Lathrop. 

The next day (Thursday) was like the 
other days at Norwich ; breakfast with his 
" old friend and good friend Shubael ; " 
"dinner with the Governor and family" at 
Mr. Breed's, where Shubael and his wife 
were also present, and where the inevita- 
ble " pompion pie " suggested the thought 
of how soon he should be beyond the 
reach of that New England dainty ; an 
after-dinner call at Mr. Coit's ; tea at Mr. 
Moore's ; and the evening at Mr. Leffing- 
well's again " in a circle of no less than 
sixteen ladies, besides many other super- 
numeraries." To the record of all this, 
he adds, " About nine, went to my lodg- 
ings, proposed a plan to the Governor, 
and received his approbation, ate supper, 
smoked the calumet for the last time, and 
bade them all a good night." 

On Friday, Dec. 5 th, our traveler, having 
taken leave of Norwich friends, journeyed 
toward his father's home, by the somewhat 
meandering way of all his " uncles and 
aunts in Lisbon, Preston,and Canterbury ;" 
and those uncles and aunts, with all the 
cousins, seem to have been the most lov- 
ing and amiable people in the world. 
Arriving at Scotland parsonage again on 
Saturday, he was detained there by a 
storm which gave him time for reading 
and writing, and for " receiving lessons of 
divine instruction from the lips of " his" 
affectionate parent." Wednesday, Dec. 
19th, the weather having become propi- 



tious, he went to Mansfield for the sake 
of visiting two more cousins, whose ami- 
able qualities he sums up by saying, " In 
short, they are two Fitches, which is suffi- 
ciently explanatory to myself." 

From Mansfield, the next day's travel 
brought him to Lebanon again, his solitary 
ride being cheered by the pleasant thought 
that all the relatives whom he has been 
visiting, and who had received him with 
kindliest affection, were so well worth 
knowing. These uncles, aunts, and 
cousins seem to have been fair specimens 
of what I may venture to call the old 
Connecticut gentry, well-to-do people 
living comfortably and honestly on their 
own acres, working six days and resting 
on the seventh according to the command- 
ment, thinking people, whose intellectual 
life was nourished chiefly by the Bible 
and the doctrinal exposition of it from the 
pulpit, men and women whose hereditary 
Puritanism had not vanished into Estheti- 
cism, and who were therefore character- 
ized more by strength of opinions about 
right and wrong than by exquisiteness of 
taste, plain people with no aristocratic 
pretensions, yet gentry as descended from 
ancestors whom they honored, and for 
whose sake they were ready to welcome 
every cousin who did not dishonor the 
stock (the gens) from which they came. 
All the kindred whom our traveling friend 
had visited in Preston, Lisbon, Canter- 
bury, and Mansfield, were as he proudly 
calls them, " Fitches," and they all knew 
their descent from James Fitch, the 
famous first minister of Norwich. 

At Mrs. Tisdale's, in Lebanon, he had 
another " charming evening with the 
ladies," and yet he took time for a call at 
"Col. Trumbull's, "where he renewed his ac- 
quaintance with Daniel and Harriet Wads- 
worth who had just arrived from Hartford. 
The next morning (Friday, Dec. i2th)he 
walked over to Col. Trumbull's where he 



6oS 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



had promised " to call for letters." The 
post-office system of the United States 
was then in its infancy, and an opportunity 
of sending letters from Lebanon to Hart- 
ford by a friendly traveler was precious. 
After an hour of talk with '-the ladies and 
with Daniel " and " some time with the 
colonel," and much delight in the "paint- 
ings of his brother " whom we call Col. 
Trumbull, he set his face toward Hartford 
at about eleven o'clock, " in company," 
he says, "with a Mr. Pitkin from Farming- 
ton, with whom I was so much pleased in 
the daytime, that I went and tarried with 
him at his uncle's in East Hartford, Fede- 
ral to a button, very civil and very hospi- 
table. Crossed the ferry in the morning, 
and dined at Mr. Perkins' with Mr. Pitkin. 
After dinner, called and delivered letters 
from Harriet and Daniel, and engaged to 
return and drink tea with smiling Cate, 
and so I did and was made very welcome 
and very happy." 

The next day being Sunday, our trav- 
eler "attended divine service at the North 
Meeting" and was much impressed with 
the sermons, especially with the afternoon 
discourse from a text which he remem- 
bered as that from which the sermon was 
preached at his own mother's funeral, " I 
was dumb, I opened not my mouth, be- 
cause thou didst it." Mr. Strong was 
then passing through one of the sorrows 
of his domestic life. Already he had 
been once a widower, and his second wife 
Anna Mc Curdy, was then wasting with the 
disease of which she died three months 
later, at the age of twenty-nine. Naturally 
the sermon from such a text and in such 
circumstances, " flowed from the heart 
and reached the heart, especially of Mason 
F. Cogswell, to whom Anna McCurdy had 
been " an old friend." As evening came 
on, he recollected his " engagement to 
Mrs. Wadsworth and Caty," and had a 
pleasant hour with them. 



On Monday, he was occupied through 
the morning with " how-do-you-do visits 
and some matters of business," but after 
dinner, we find him paying his respects to 
Dr. Hopkins, and " chatting physic with 
him an hour or so," then "galloping out to 
the hill" and rejoicing to find the invalids 
there (of the Talcott family) all better 
than when he saw them last. He " gal- 
lops back again and drinks tea with Mr. 
and Mrs. Wolcott, — a charming couple " 
whose happiness moves him to write, " I 
wish I was as well married, and anybody 
and everybody could say as much of me." 
The Dr. Hopkins with whom he talked on 
professional subjects, was in his day the 
foremost man of the medical profession 
not only in Hartford but, if I mistake not, 
in Connecticut, one of " the Hartford 
wits," if not the most famous of them. 

We may assume, at least we may be 
permitted to conjecture that Dr.Cogswell, 
a young man not yet settled in life, had 
in his thoughts, while talking with Dr. 
Hopkins, the " plan " on which he had 
taken the advice of Gov. Huntington be- 
fore leaving Norwich ; and that his "plan" 
was to establish himself in his profession 
there in Hartford. The Mr. Wolcott 
whose domestic felicity he so admired, 
was Oliver Wolcott, afterwards secretary 
of the treasury under John Adams, and in 
his later years, governor of Connecticut. 

Just here the manuscript begins to be 
again imperfect. Some enterprising mouse 
seems to have meddled with it, and what 
remains of the last few pages is inter- 
spersed with many a hiatus valde deflen- 
dus. I can make out that after tea with 
Mr. and Mrs. Wolcott the diarist " spent 

a social hour with and Julia Seymour, 

certainly a pretty girl, and a good 

one too" that he "called and took 

leave of at Col. Wadsworth's, that 

he was lodged that night at Mr. Strong's 
where he " attended particularly to Mrs. 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



Gog 



Strong's case and had a long and friendly 
conversation with her husband, pondering 
meanwhile (we may conjecture) the ques- 
tion of making his abode in Hartford, I 
find him proceeding on the next day to 
Haddam, and there " welcomed very sin- 
cerely by Theodore and Parson May and 
family " — thence, after a day's detention 
by storm, he comes to New Haven again, 
and finds the same hospitality which he 
had found four weeks before. 

The last date on these torn leaves is 
Saturday, Dec. 19th. On that day, after 
" several morning visits " — additional to 
all the visits of the preceding day, he rode 
to Greenfield via Stratford, Victory, etc. 
It was seven o'clock in the evening, when 
he arrived at the house of the pastor, who 
was also Che poet of " Greenfield Hill." 
He found himself " in the midst of a 
smiling circle ; " and the talk by the win- 
ter evening fireside was cheerful and in- 
structive. I can make out concerning 
the "four young ladies under Mr.Dwight's 
tuition" that "the expression of each 
was uncommonly fine — a loveliness of 
disposition, a benevolence of heart, and a 
sprightliness of thought were clearly dis- 
cernible in every eye." Here we come 

to a ragged edge. The The last 

words are " If I can judge account 

given of them by Mrs. Dwight, and 

my own they are lovely girls, and 

on the high road to make husbands 

happy." 

This picture of life in the last century, 
a snap shot, so to speak, taken when 
people did not know that any one was 
looking, discloses new charms at every 
reading. 

After we have excepted the powdered 
hair, and the unaffected interest in Sun- 
day worship, which, alas ! is not at all 
characteristic of these days ; it is hard to 
realize that these young people are not of 
us to-day. The cultivated manners, the 



ease of intercourse, the unaffected enjoy- 
ment of the pleasures of life, disclose a 
time of leisure and courteous living. 

While many are ransacking every musty 
book of town enactments, and church 
records, to prove that our ancestors led a 
treadmill existence under the clouds of 
bigotry and severity, harassed by a super- 
stitious dread of a Deity robed in terrors, 
and by the present fear of harsh and strait- 
laced magistrates, we may read this cheer- 
ful account of dancing, music, and singing, 
balls and teas, all enjoyed by the mini- 
ster's son without any reproach, and in the 
midst of families whose social position 
was beyond question. Probably more 
genuine pleasure was enjoyed by young 
people in those days than now, for the 
leading families were still grouped near 
enough each other for the exercise of free 
hospitality among all the members of the 
"clans," and an intimate knowledge of each 
other and an affectionate interest were re- 
tained, which, with a certain quality in the 
conditions of life, made social intercourse 
satisfying without all the feverish effort to 
secure novel pleasures which is seen 
now. 

And what shall be said of the extraor- 
dinary prevalence ofpompion pie " at 
that period? Evidently, cut-worms and 
other enemies of the delicious vegetable 
had not then gained an ascendency. And 
we must lament the vanishing of the dig- 
nified name " pompion " behind the un- 
couth "pumpkin." 

Dr. Bacon's running commentary adds 
much to the value and lucidity of the 
text. It may be well to explain that Dr. 
Bacon married Miss Catherine Terry, the 
daughter of the Catherine Wadsworth, 
afterwards Mrs. Terry, who appears in the 
diary as the good-hearted younger sister, 
a circumstance which makes all the more 
remarkable the return to Dr. Bacon of 
the manuscript. 



6io 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



Interesting as is this glimpse of " early 
days in Connecticut " for its inherent 
value, the diary gains in meaning when it 
is read in the light of the subsequent 
career of its writer. This genial and 
gifted young man, the always welcome 
guest, had not been idle in the years 
before this visiting time. 

Born in 1761, he was a Yale graduate 
in 1780, and although the youngest in a 
class which included such men as Matthew 
and Roger Griswold and other able men, 
he was the valedictorian. 

As has been said, he had an elder 
brother, James, who had been a surgeon 
in the Revolutionary army, and had after- 
wards practiced in New York. Mason 
Cogswell was with him in that place, and 
studied surgery and medicine. For 
several years he was in Stamford, where 
he made important and lasting friends. 
His musical gifts were of notable use in 
Stamford ; for it is related that he not 
only instructed the church choir of that 
place in the common psalm-tunes, but 
also in an anthem or other piece of set 
music for every Sabbath in the year. It 
is easy to imagine that the attractions of 
the young choir-master made the exercises 
of " singing-school" especially delightful 
to the Stamford beaux and belles. 

As may be seen, a thought for the 
serious business of life constantly lurked 
beneath the pleasures of the trip ; and as 
a result of the discussions mentioned in 
the diary, Dr. Cogswell came to Hartford 
as a practicing physician in 1789. 

At all events, Dr. Cogswell became one 
of the foremost surgeons of his day, and 
was revered and loved by all who came 
under his influence. His skill, his devo- 
ted attention to his patients, his sympathy 
with the sick, his compassion for all forms 
of suffering, earned for him again and 
again the name of the " beloved physi- 
cian." 



When the Retreat for the Insane was 
established in Hartford, Dr. Cogswell was 
one of the leading supporters of the 
scheme. 

His professional reputation was not 
without foundation. In 1803, he per- 
formed the operation of tying the carotid 
artery, which, although now common, had 
never been attempted in this country. A 
year before, it had been done in London 
by Mr. Abernethy, and at about the same 
time, once on the Continent ; but Dr. 
Cogswell could not have known it, and 
he thus deserved all the credit of a 
pioneer. He also introduced to America 
the removal of cataract from the eye. 

As was the custom of the time, he often 
received students of medicine, and he was 
deemed so efficient an instructor that he 
was asked to take the chair of surgery in 
the Yale Medical School. For various 
reasons that offer was at last declined. 

His wife had sad memories of the 
Revolution ; for she was the daughter of 
that Colonel William Ledyard who was 
slain with his own sword in the act of 
surrender at Groton. The blood-stained 
waist-coat may still be seen in the histori- 
cal collection at the Wadsworth Atheneum 
in Hartford which was founded by the 
very Daniel Wadsworth who appears as a 
youth in the foregoing diary. But Mary 
Ledyard brought grace and courtesy to 
the Cogswell house on Prospect street, 
and the mansion became a center of 
culture and refined life. Dr. Cogswell's 
library was one of the best in the state ; 
he was still an ardent lover of music ; and 
his poetry was of no small repute in his 
time. He was noble in mien and careful 
in his dress, always wearing the silk 
stockings and knee-breeches of the old 
time, saying that it was the only proper 
dress for a gentleman. 

But, amid all the pleasure of this home, 
enriched by happiness within and honor 






DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



6n 



without, there appeared the " spot of 
evil," a touch of the blight that falls, 
sooner or later, on all human bliss. 

The third and youngest daughter, born 
in 1805, the bright and pretty Alice, 
when a little more than two years old, 
became ill with "spotted fever," now- 
called cerebro-spiral-meningitis. She was 
brought back to health, but soon she 
failed to notice the song of the birds or 
the voices of her friends. She was deaf. 

"Months passed on, and the usual re- 
sult followed — the prattle of baby talk 
ceased, and only inarticulate, gurgling 
sounds came from her lips. The sweet 
child was a deaf mute. 

Of course everything that fondness 
and intelligence could suggest to soften 
the calamity, and to mitigate its con- 
sequences, was done ; but there was 
little to do, for the idea of teaching 
deaf-mutes was almost unknown in this 
country. With unspeakable pain, Dr. 
Cogswell saw the little girl lapsing into 
ignorance, with no prospect of devel- 
oping the natural gifts which were 
evidently hers. 

But he read of the wonderful success 
in teaching mutes in France and Eng- 
land, and there was a gleam cf hope 
in the resolve which arose within him 
to secure such benefits for his child. 

Thus it was that the name of Alice 
Cogswell became indissolubly connect- 
ed with the establishment of a famous 
philanthropic enterprise. The question 
arose, should Alice be sent to Europe for 
instruction, or could that instruction be 
brought to her? 

Of course, the latter was desirable, so 
Dr. Cogswell applied himself, with the 
tact and good-humor, and energy which 
have appeared in the diary, to interesting 
the community in the education of the 
deaf. People said that it was useless, 
and that there were not enough deaf- 



mutes to be worthy of consideration. 
The answer to the first was in the work 
already done abroad : to the second a 
reply was given by applying for statistics 
to the General Association of Congrega- 
tional Clergymen, which met at Sharon, in 
June, 1 81 2. That was in the governorship 
of John Cotton Smith, and I like to think 
of this preliminary discussion of a great 
enterprise and charity as taking place 
within the spacious rooms of that fi^>e old 




M^&£&^ > 



monument of the colonial builder's taste 
and skill, the John Cotton Smith house. 

The Association informed Dr. Cogswell 
of eighty-four deaf and dumb persons then 
living within the borders of Connecticut. 
In that proportion, there must have been 
about four hundred in the New England 
states, and about two thousand in the 
the whole country. 

Evidently, Dr. Cogswell's ministrations 
to the suffering brought a rich harvest 
when he was in need of help, for he 



6l2 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL. 



quickly succeeded in arousing the desired 
zeal among his influential friends, and on 
April 13, 1815, some of them were in- 
vited to meet at his house to discuss send- 
ing some one abroad to study methods 
and to bring home the knowledge neces- 
sary for carrying on a school for the deaf 
and dumb. The names have been pre- 
served : "Ward Woodbridge, Esq., Daniel 
Wadsworth, Esq., Henry Hudson, Esq., 
Hon. Nathaniel Terry, John Caldwell, 
Esq., Daniel Buck, Esq., Joseph Battell, 
Esq. (of Norfolk), Rev. Nathan Strong, 
D. D., and Rev. Thomas H. Gallaudet." 

The committee appointed by these 
gentlemen to select an envoy, and collect 
the means for his expenses,consistedof Dr. 
Cogswell, and Mr. Ward Woodbridge, the 
latter being a prominent man in business 
circles. Hartford citizens responded so 
heartily to the call that in one day Mr. 
Woodbridge received subscriptions suffi- 
cient to defray the expenses of the mission. 

That old subscription list is very char- 
acteristic of persons and places then and 
there. Sometimes you see the proof of 
personal friendship ; sometimes of an 
especial effort aroused by an especial 
appeal, and again of the broad generosity 
of rich men who were ready to give to 
every good object. 

Mr. Gallaudet and Dr. Cogswell sub- 
scribed largely — we can understand that 
real affection lay behind the sums given 
by " Lydia Huntley " and " Miss Lydia 
Huntley's School." There, too, is the 
name of Leonard Bacon, into whose hands 
the diary afterwards came — the Rev. 
Benoni Upson of the village of Berlin 
gave of his store one hundred dollars, 
Gov. John Cotton Smith showed in like 
manner the effect of the talk in Sharon, 
and there is the name so familiar as that 
of a generous giver, Joseph Battell, of 
Norfolk. The largest individual subscrip- 
tion from Hartford was that of Daniel 



Wadsworth, and the next in value was by 
Chauncey Deming, of the neighboring 
village of Farmington, then one of the 
richest towns in the state. In fact among 
the churches of Connecticut, that of 
Farmington kept step with the cities, 
being barely exceeded by one in New 
Haven. And' the scattered families of 
East Windsor were moved to great 
generosity. In curious sequence is the 
fact that from that town came one of the 
oldest and foremost instructors of mutes, 
one who at the persuasion of Dr. Gallaudet 
gave the zeal and devotion of his life to 
the work — Professor David Ely Bartlett. 
We can see the evidence of the family 
interest in Norwich, too. When the 
subscription was extended to Massachu- 
setts, the list showed such names as 
Parkman, Appleton, Channing, Sears, 
Shaw, and Phillips. The state of Penn- 
sylvania sent its contribution to the cause 
by Richard Paxton. In New York, few 
gave because there was a desire to have a 
separate school there, but among the few 
John Jacob Astorwas prominent. Appar- 
ently, Albany was deeply interested, 
Stephen Van Rensselaer leading. Several 
schools in New Jersey sent their gifts, and 
there is a record of fifty cents from " a 
little girl." We hope that she was always 
blessed with means for gratifying her 
charitable impulses so early shown. And 
in other lands, from France to the Isle of 
Trinidad, kind hearts were touched. 
Among the English givers were " Mrs. 
Hannah More," and Zachary Macaulay, 
the great promoter . of the abolition of 
slavery in the English colonies, and the 
father of Lord Macaulay. 

And now, the way having been prepared, 
who should go on this errand? Several 
friends had endeavored to impart some 
instruction to the speechless Alice, among 
them the gifted poet of Hartford, Lydia 
Huntley, afterwards Mrs. Sigourney, and 



DR. MASON FITCH COGSWELL 



6.3 



all were sure that a bright mind lay be- 
hind the bars of silence. Mrs. Sigourney 
afterwards wrote a charming sketch ot the 
character and the early school days of her 
famous pupil, and published it in " Letters 
to My Pupils." 

Of all these friends and teachers, the 
young clergyman, Thomas Gallaudet, a 
graduate of Yale and Andover, had been 
most successful in establishing communi- 
cation by signs. He was a neighbor, and 
while at home on a vacation, he made his 
first effort in teaching a deaf mute. He 
saw the little girl at play with other chil- 
dren, in his father's garden, and taking 
much interest in her, he succeeded, in 
that first lesson, in teaching her that the 
written word " hat " meant the very arti- 
cle of head-gear which he held in his hand. 
From that he had gradually gone on to 
some simple sentences. 

Mr. Gallaudet was asked to undertake 
the enterprise in question ; he accepted, 
promising to " visit Europe for the sake 
of qualifying himself to become a teacher 
of the deaf and dumb in this country." 
He brought back with him, after some 
months, a French mute of scholarly train- 
ing and noble character, a professor in the 
French institution, Laurent Clerc. The 
career of each of these men in their special 
field of well-doing is well-known. 

In M. Clerc's account of his coming to 
the United States, he says, " We alighted 
at Dr. Cogswell's in Prospect street. 
Alice was immediately sent for, and when 
she made her appearance, I beheld a very 
interesting little girl. She had one of the 
most intelligent countenances that I ever 
saw. I had left many persons and objects 
in France endeared to me by association 
— and I sometimes regretted leaving my 
native land \ but on seeing Alice, I had 
only to recur to the object which had in- 
duced me to seek these shores, and sadness 
was subdued by an approving conscience." 






During Mr. Gallaudet's absence the 
proper business was transacted, and thus 
was incorporated, in 181 6, in Hartford, 
the " Connecticut Asylum for the educa- 
tion of deaf and dumb persons," the first 
institution of the kind in this country. 
The name was afterwards changed to the 
"American Asylum for the Deaf. 

Little Alice Cogswell was the first pupil, 
and in 181 7, it was formally opened with 
a class of three, increasing in three days 
to seven, in the south part of the building 
afterwards known as the City Hotel. A 
great crowd assembled on the following 
Sunday evening in the Center Church, to 
hear Mr. Gallaudet preach from the text, 
'•Then the eyes of the blind shall be 
opened, and the ears of the deaf unstop- 
ped. Then shall the lame man leap as a 
hart, and the tongue shall sing, etc." 
The seven unhearing pupils were there, 
little knowing what hopes were fixed on 
their new opportunity for progress, and 
undoubtedly trying to make good use of 
their eyes, and wondering why they had 
suddenly become the center of observa- 
tion. In a little more than a year, the 
number of pupils had increased to between 
fifty and sixty ; soon the New England 
states arranged to share the benefits and 
to contribute towards the expenses of the 
new institution, which was attracting 
scholars from all over the Union ; and in 
a few years, teachers had gone out from it 
to establish other schools for the deaf and 
dumb in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, 
and other states, so that the Hartford 
school has been the parent of that illus- 
trious family of American schools for the 
deaf which are "universally acknowledged 
to be the best of their kind." 

Such have been some of the beneficient 
and ever-increasing results of the life in 
Hartford of our young traveler. 

Besides Alice, his children were, Mary 
(Mrs. Lewis Weld), Elizabeth (Mrs. John 



614 



INS PI R A TION. 



T. Norton of Farmington), Mason F. 
Cogswell, M. D. of Albany, and Catharine 
Ledyard(Mrs. Cortlandt Van Rensselaer.) 
He died of pneumonia, December 17, 
1830, in the seventieth year of his age. 
Dr. Bacon says, '-The illness which ended 
his life was short — only five days, yet long 
enough for the whole city to be moved 
with anxiety. 1 am informed by one who 
lived in the immediate neighborhood, 
that late in the evening of the two days 
preceding his death, people stood in 
groups along the sidewalks of Prospect 
street, waiting for the physicians to come 
from his bedside, and asking in whispers 
for the latest indications." Miss Catherine 
Beecher's words in a letter expressed the 
general sentiment : " He is gone, our 
friend — our adviser — our help and com- 
forter both in sickness and health;— it 



would seem as if the whole place were in 
tears at his death ; there is scarcely a 
family that does not feel that it has not 
lost a friend." To Alice, the darling of 
her father, this grief was a death-blow. 
For thirteen days she survived, shaken in 
body and mind by the loss of one who 
had been the unfailing support and pro- 
tection of her maimed life. As she said, 
'•Her heart had grown so close to her 
father's that they could not be separated." 
In her melancholy wanderings she asked, 
" Is it David's harp I hear? " and again , 
exclaimed "Oh, when I arrive at Heaven's 
gate, how my father will hold out his arms 
to take me to his bosom ! " 

Such are some of the things that may 
be read between the lines of the faded 
diary written in 1787. 



INSPIRATION. 



BY HERBERT RANDALL. 



To walk with Nature hand in hand, 
A heart attuned in thee 

To stormy- wind, the skylark's song, 
Or cadence of the sea ; 



To feel the soul upmount to where 
The trembling pleiads shine,— 

This is to leave the finite world 
And live with the Divine. 



THE TREASURE OE THE MONEY PONDS. 



BY WILLIAM ALLEN WILLLR. 



SOUND of the surf filled the house. 
In fair weather it breathed in all the 
rooms, and in storms when the long swells 
came in from the Atlantic it resounded 
hoarsely with echoes of reverberations. 



In the seventeenth century, Fishers Island 



was a solitary place ; birds and wild crea- 
tures were in the woods, and bands of 
Pequots sometimes wandered there, but 
only sea-faring folk would have settled 
in such a land, for the soul of the place 
was the sea. Master Jonathan Rose and 
his good wife lived in the house. The 
latch-string was always out, and Good- 
man Rose was loved by all the fishermen 
along the coast who never failed, when in 
the vicinity, to sheer in towards the land 
to exchange hails with him ; and no 
stranger ever came to the Island who did 
not go away his friend. He lived on the 
farm and took care of it for the Winthrops, 
who often visited at the old house. 

It was a gray morning, and the wind 
was east ; the surf had grown heavier 
through the night, and the deepening 
pulses that stirred the house told the 
change in the weather." 

" It's blowing up a storm." said the old 
man to the three girls who were making 
their plans for the day. Lucy Winthrop 
had come only the day before from New 
London to visit at the old home, and 
with her were her kinswoman, Christobel 
Gallop, and her friend Susannah Palmes. 
They had planned this visit long before 
and had talked about it often ; they 
would wander over the hills and along 

615 



the shore, and in the evening watch the 
moon rise out of the sea, and they would 
talk till late at night of the thousand 
things that will fill the thoughts and hearts 
of young girls till the end of time. 

•'Listen to the surf!" exclaimed Lucy 
as the old house seemed to sigh louder 
than before. "The rocks on YVicopesset 
must be white this morning, let us go 
down and see them." This was quickly 
assented to and the three girls wandered 
down to the east end of the island. 
There were white caps on the water as 
far as the gray horizon, and across Wico- 
pesset were windrows of foam where the 
ebb tide met the ocean surges and rolled 
them up in long white heaps. Returning, 
they stood on a hill back of the house 
and watched with increasing agitation, a 
sail come up from the eastward. A sail 
was not a common sight ; they were ac- 
quainted with the sailing craft of New 
London but this was not one of them. 
She came into the Sound by the Watch 
Hill channel, a sloop of forty tons or so, 
and her decks swarmed with men. 

Susannah tried to count them, " Thirty- 
six, thirty-seven, thirty-eight," — and her 
voice trembled with excitement. " Oh, 
girls, what do you suppose it can be? " 

"A pirate!" exclaimed Christobel. 
" See the big gun on the deck? " 

" No," said Lucy positively," she car- 
ries the English flag." 

The stranger stood in towards East 
Harbor until well inside the point and 
opposite the house when she took in her 



6i6 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



jib and dropped anchor. Presently a 
boat put out from the side of the sloop 
and made towards the shore. The girls 
with some apprehension watched Uncle 
Jonathan go down to the landing to meet 
the visitors. 

The boat came swiftly in. "Way 
enough ! " growled the bluff old boat- 
steerer who stood with a long oar in the 
stern. In a moment the boat grated on 



the sun, his eyes were blue with a calm 
kindliness in them, and when he spoke 
there was no mare apprehension of him. 

'•Have I the honor to meet Master 
Jonathan Rose?" asked the stranger with 
a smile as he approached the old man. 

"Ay, friend that is my name," replied 
Jonathan. 

"'You have a good name on Long 
Island, Master Rose, and I was told there 




II 



■c*toJ*s 



-JJf^jpiir --*.„— 



Mm 






"They . 



watched a sail come up from the eastward." 



the sand, and an officer who had been 
seated in the stern, rose and stepped out 
on the beach. There was little in his 
dress to show his rank, but there was that 
in his face that bespoke authority. 

He was a man of medium height and 
build with dark brown beard streaked 
with gray * forty-five he looked though he 
moved like a youth of twenty. His face 
was furrowed and bronzed by the sea and 



that one who had the friendship of his 
Excellency, the Earl of Bellamont, would 
need no further passport to your kind- 
ness." 

''Thou wast rightly told, good sir; his 
Excellency honored us with his presence 
not a twelve month since, in company 
with the master of the manor. Thou and 
thy shipmen will have an English welcome 
in the old home of the Winthrops." 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



6iy 



" You have not asked the name of your 
visitor, Master Rose, and it is proof of the 
hospitality I have bten told to expect from 
you. I am William Kidd, captain in His 
Majesty's service." 

" I have known of thee in time past, 
when New York did honor thee for thy 
many good services done to the province." 

" Ay, more than once they honored me, 
and I have friends among them yet, but 
enemies have been busy there and I know 
not whether they would give me welcome 
now." He spoke half sadly and like one 
whose thoughts were far away. 

The kind heart of the older man noted 
the shadow that had fallen upon the mind 
of his visitor, and he said, turning towards 
the girls who had ventured nearer, " My 
young friends here will be glad to meet 
one who has served the King and these 
Colonies against the French. And the 
girls told him laughingly that they had 
thought him a pirate, and they all talked 
together and went in to dinner while the 
boat's crew returned to the sloop. 

During the meal the Captain told them 
of his ship the Quedah Merchant, richly 
laden, and left on the coast of Hispaniola, 
of the burning of the Adventure Galley on 
the coast of Madagascar ; he told of wild 
lands and savage men, of sea-fights and 
rich toll taken from the French and the 
Moors. And then he came to speak of 
his^native Scotland, and memories of child- 
hood in Greenock, and of Robert Living- 
stone his lifelong friend in New York,and 
of his wife whom he had not seen since 
he sailed away in the fall of '96. 

The simplicity of the life in this island 
home, and the generous welcome he had 
received touched the heart of the sailor, 
and he spoke very freely of his life as a 
privateersman, and of his anxiety over 
rumors that his enemies charged him with 
piracy. " I hold the French passports of 
all the vessels I have taken," said he, and 



with deep feeling he added, " I'd be shot 
to death before I would turn pirate ! " 
Then he told them of his purpose in com- 
ing to Fishers Island. He had been 
chased by French pirates while coming 
north from the West Indies, and he wished 
to guard against the possibility of capture 
of certain valuables now aboard the San 
Antonio, by burying them on the Island. 
This he hoped to accomplish that very 
afternoon. 

Some two miles west of the house as 
the crow flies is Chocomount, the highest 
point on the island, and Captain Kidd de- 
termined to go to the top of the hill and 
from there select some place suitable for 
the burial of the treasure. Lucy proposed 
that she and her two friends show the 
Captain the way, and the offer was gladly 
accepted. Word was sent off to the San 
Antonio to get under way and sail around 
the point to the little harbor under the 
hill. Then with a parting word from 
Uncle Jonathan and a cherry assurance 
from Mother Rose that she would have 
supper waiting for them when they came 
back, they set out for Chocomount. 

The girls were excited and happy with 
their romantic adventure. This captain 
in the King's service was already their 
hero. They followed the winding path in 
single file — the dark-haired Lucy, tall, re- 
served, self-reliant ■ — the sailor whom po- 
litical intrigue and foul conspiracy united 
to destroy and leave to baleful memories, 
and Christobel and Susannah, in order 
named, gathering violets and may flowers 
and laughing and talking together as they 
strode along. It was half-past one in the 
afternoon when they started on their 
journey, and it was a long way through 
the woods. The wind, which had gone 
down considerably since early morning, 
sighed drearily in the tops of the trees, 
and now and then they could hear the far 
sound of the surf. It must have been 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



nearly three o'clock when they reached 
the top of the hill. 

The summit of Chocomount was bare of 
trees. The bleak winds had kept it clear 
of vegetation, leaving an unobstructed 
view of the whole island and the surround- 
ing waters of the Sound. Three miles 
north could be seen the Connecticut shore, 
a stretch of gloomy woodland, extending 
from Pequot river to the Narragansett 
country. In the harbor to the north-east 
of the hill the San Antonio was already at 




"In the harbor to the northeast of the hill 



anchor. To the west the Island was 
diversified with woods and ponds and 
here and there a clearing. To the east of 
Chocomount a little valley reaches south 
from the harbor, widening into a plain 
which extends to the south shore. On 
the east of this plain a number of ponds, 
with shallow outlet to the sea. lie just back 
of the sand hills of the beach. 

Captain Kidd, after scanning the land 
very closely in this direction, waved a 
signal to the sloop and immediately there 
were signs of increased activity aboard. 
The girls were watching the San Antonio 



when an exclamation from the Captain 
caused them to turn. He was looking off 
to the southward. Over near Montauk 
four vessels were steering north towards 
Wicopesset ; their rig could be seen — a 
ship, a catch and two sloops. -''Trimming 
is still on my track ! " muttered Kidd to 
himself, and then turning to Lucy he said, 
" French pirates, Mistress Winthrop ! we 
have need to work quick, for they must 
not find the San Antonio." 

They hastened down the hill to the 
shore. The sloop's 
boat was waiting at 
a point of rocks 
where there was 
depth of water for 
landing. Immedi- 
ately, at the Cap- 
tain's direction, sev- 
eral heavy canvas 
bags were taken out 
and put upon the 
beach together with 
an iron box large 
enough to hold the 
treasure. Leaving 
the girls with this 
precious freight, 
Kidd went off to the 
sloop. In a short 
time he returned in 
the boat fitted out 
with sail and compass and manned by two 
seamen. They were heavily bearded fel- 
lows with a rolling gait and frank honest 
voices of Scotch accent. "Abel Owens 
and Richard Barlicorn are countrymen of 
mine," said Kidd. " Many years we have 
sailed together, against the French along 
the Jersey shore, and against the Moorish 
pirates in the Eastern seas. Ay, Balicorn 
and Owens have stood with me through 
sea-fight and through mutiny, and they 
would stand by me before the highest ^ 
tribunal in the world." 

The San Antonio was now standing out 







^jjra^f^- 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



619 



of the harbor. " The mate has orders," 
explained Kidd, " to sail up to the west- 
ward and to be on the lookout for us 
to-morrow at the west end of the 
Island." 

" Now, my young friends," said the 
Captain with a frank kindliness that con- 
trolled, while it disappointed their 
curiosity, " I will ask you to stay by the 
boat while my men and I bury the 
treasure. It would be a troublesome 
secret for you to share. I trust you, but 
you would be asked about these things 
and it is easy to say ' I don't know,' and 
hard to say ' I must not tell.'" They 
knew that this was true, and very cheer- 
fully remained on the beach. Captain 
Kidd, taking the compass from the boat 
and his men taking shovels and as many 
of the canvas bags as they could carry, 
started into the woods towards the south- 
east. More than an hour passed and then 
the two sailors returned for the iron box 
and the rest of the treasure. It seemed a 
long time to the girls before the party 
came back. They feared mother Rose 
would worry over their prolonged absence, 
for the sun had set and the east wind was 
chill and cold. At last the party returned 
and Captain Kidd, who had been to the 
top of Chocomount, reported that the 
French vessels had tacked off shore and 
were now well out to sea. 

It was already dark when they embarked 
and stood out of the harbor. The wind 
was northeast and was rising. Owens 
took the helm, and the Captain, relieved 
in mind that the San Antonio was out of 
reach of the French and the treasure 
safely concealed, became communicative. 
He inquired about the old house. 

" Fifty-three years ago, it was built," 
said Lucy : " I have seen the first letter 
that came to the Island. It was dated 
October 28, 1646, and Christobel's grand- 
father brought it in his sloop from Boston." 



" Is Christobel a family name, Mistress 
Gallop? " asked Captain Kidd. 

" It was my grandmother's name and it 
is mine, but I don't like it," said the girl. 

" It is a very good name," returned the 
Captain, " and it has been right fairly 
bestowed. But I have heard before of 
the sloop Buck and of Captain Gallop's 
sea-fight off here with the Indians in the 
early days before the Pequot War." 

" The old sloop lies up the Mystic 
River yonder going to decay, and I have 
seen the marks of arrows in her mast and 
the scars in her planking. But nothing 
happens now," sighed the girl ; " I wish 
something would happen now-a-days." 

The sailor thought of the pirates and he 
laughed, saying, " I think something 
would happen if William Trimming should 
get hold of Captain Kidd." Then turning 
to the helmsman he said, "You may put 
about, Owens, and stand in towards East 
Harbor." 

As they drew in under the shadow of 
the land, Barlicorn, who was in the bow, 
said in a low tone to the Captain, " There 
is a small craft just ahead, sir." 

Kidd peered into the darkness at the 
same time instinctively loosening the 
pistol in his belt. " Keep off a little, 
Owens, and bring her into the wind along 
side of the fellow." 

" Ay, ay, sir," answered the sailor and 
in a moment the boat brushed against a 
row-boat in which were Jonathan and 
Mother Rose. 

" I'm thankful to find ye," exclaimed 
the old man. "There's a lot of ungodly 
Frenchmen at the house, and I fear it 
bodes thee no good. The house is no 
safe place for thee to-night." 

" What does their leader look like," 
inquired Kidd. 

" A little man with round tace, and 
black hair, and black eyes, and a most 
profane swearer. They call him Trim- 



620 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



ming — an Englishman with a French 
heart. He asked me if I knew aught of 
Captain Kidd. When I toid him truly 
that one who called himself Kidd had 
been here and had departed, he swore 



sloop was far out of reach, he said, " We 
must send to Stonington Point for help. 
Mother, here, will go over with thee and 
she can tell thee where to go. The 
women folks must stay in Stonington till 







like one possessed of a devil, and I chid 
him for his evil condition." The old 
man's voice trembled with indignation as 
he told his story. He had indeed saved 
Captain Kidd from almost certain death. 
He had trusted to find the San Antonio, 
and when he learned' that by this time the 



these sons of Belial are gone." 

Mother Rose, somewhat unwil- 
ling to leave Jonathan, was trans- 
ferred to the larger boat. She 
had succeeded in smuggling from 
the house some cloaks and a 
basket of provisions, and these were very 
welcome to the girls for they were by this 
time cold and hungiy. 

" What is your plan?" asked Captain 
Kidd of Jonathan. 

" Hew Agag in pieces before the Lord," 
said the old man solemnly. " Bring help 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



02 i 



from Stonington." He had fought with 
Church in King Philip's War, and his 
fighting blood was up. " I shall expect 
you back by morning," said he, and so 
rowed away to the landing. 

Captain Kidd now took the helm, and 
trimming in the sail, stood out of the 
the harbor to the northward. They were 
soon clear of the land, and the boat lean- 
ing to the wind began to plunge ahead 
into the gloom. 

•'You were wishing something to hap- 
pen, fair Mistress Gallop," said Kidd with 
gentle raillery ; " wishes don't often come 
true so soon." 

Christobel shivered. " It was a foolish 
wish," she said. Susannah gave a nervous 
little laugh and sought Lucy's hand in the 
darkness. Lucy, perhaps, was wishing 
for Major Palmes and the company she 
had often seen at trainings. 

The wind blew strong from the north- 
east, and the boat close-hauled, with the 
help of the ebb tide, was making a good 
course for Stonington. In the bow, peer- 
ing ahead and keeping such lookout as he 
could, was Richard Barlicorn, and on the 
forward thwart sat Abel Owens, the watch 
below — as he said, ready to answer a call 
of all hands. 

Fishers Island was now far astern, but 
the light in the farm house was still visi- 
ble. It was their point of departure and 
so a guide to their course, and Kidd 
looking back now and then thought 
grimly of the piratical crew in the old 
house, and of William Trimming, once 
master of the Quedah Merchant which 
had been taken under French passports. 
This swarthy little Englishman had sailed 
half around the world to pay an old score, 
but it looked as though he were cornered 
at last. 

The ebb tide made a choppy sea m the 
Sound. The black water would swell up 
to the gunwale and then from the midst 



of it would flash a white crest with its 
stinging salt spray, and then the boat 
would sink again into the hollows. The 
girls were good sailors, a ride on the 
water was an ordinary event with them, 
but now for some unexplained reason 
they felt more keenly the fascination of 
the night and the sea, and they were 
awed by it. They sat close around 
Mother Rose on the gratings in the bot- 
tom of the boat. The good woman was 
grieving as if her heart would break at 
leaving Jonathan on the Island. 

" Dear Auntie Rose," said Lucy com- 
fortingly, " no one would hurt Uncle 
Jonathan." 

But the dear soul would not be com- 
forted. " Child," said she, "they are 
sons of the heathen. You know them 
not. I would that Jonathan had come 
with me ! " They all drew closer their 
wet cloaks, and relapsed into silence, 
anxiously wishing for Stonington. 

" Land ahead, Sir, on the weather bow," 
said Barlicorn. 

" Ay, Barlicorn, that is Stonington," 
answered Kidd cheerily. " Mother Rose, 
where shall we land?" 

" Why," said she, " Cousin Thomas lives 
on the east of the P'int and I guess we 
better land on that side. Thomas will do 
all he can for Jonathan." 

So they worked the boat around to the 
east of the Point and landed at a little 
wharf used by the fishermen. It was 
after ten o'clock, a late hour for men 
whose work begins at dawn, and the 
house of Thomas Rose was dark and still. 
But the honest fisherman responded 
promptly to their call and gave them a 
most hearty welcome. Goodman Thomas 
listened with wonder to their story, and 
then with a readiness born of this frontier 
life he started forth to call the neighbors 
together. 

Quickly the word went round that 



42 



622 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



Brother Jonathan Rose on Fishers Island 
was fallen into the hands of French pirates. 
Then these colonists prepared for action. 
The powder horn was filled from the pre- 
cious store of powder ; the long flint-lock 
was taken down from the antlers and 
loaded with ball and the pan was carefully 
primed. They showed the mettle of their 



said. " Some of them were with my 
father in the Indian War ; some of them 
are kinsmen of mine. They all know 
Uncle Jonathan, and they know the 
French, but" — the girl added with a 
smile — " it is not good even to think of 
the French." 

The fishermen were getting up sail on 




pasture by preparing for battle with the 
same sang-froid and determination of 
purpose as they would have shown in fell- 
ing trees. By two o'clock in the morning 
they were ready to sail — a stalwart com- 
pany of seventeen men. 

" Do you know these men, Mistress 
Gallop?" asked Captain Kidd. 

" Indeed yes, I know them all," she 



the smack and it was time to 
be off. Captain Kidd took the 
hand of Mother Rose saying, 
"Don't worry about Jonathan, 
Mother ; it will be all right." 

His hearty kindliness cheered the good 

woman in spite of her fears. 

"Well, I hope so," said she, "but I 

wish he hadn't been so set on stayin'. 

God be with thee," she added, " I don't 

know what we'd a done without thee." 
" I am sorry to part from you all," said 

the Captain, " I have been a wanderer on 

the sea and you have given me a home 

welcome." 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



623 



To the girls he said, " I shall be com- 
pelled to share with you my secret ; I 
cannot take the chances of war with these 
papers upon me." With this he gave to 
Lucy a little package. " It is the record 
of the ranges and the inventory of the 
treasure," he explained, and added, "You 
may keep this package till I call for it. 
The old King's officer will not forget that 



the fog to her moorings. She was crowded 
with men ; on board were the French, 
Trimming's men — all prisoners, but Trim- 
ming, their leader, was dead. Then it was 
told how the brave little band of Colonists 
landed at daybreak and surrounded the 
house, where Trimming and his men were 
holding high revel, how the pirates repre- 
sented themselves shipwrecked men. "If 




" Three eager girls reaa 



the papers." 



he has a dowry of gems and gold for three 
fair daughters of Connecticut. Good-by 
till I come back from Boston." With this 
gallant adieu he hastily embarked and was 
soon on his way with the Stonington men. 
It is always hard to wait. The night 
drew slowly on, and the gray morning 
came with dripping fogs and the monoto- 
nous murmur of the surf on Watch Hill. 
Slowly the forenoon wore away. It was 
twelve o'clock when the watchers on the 
shore saw ^the smack coming in through 



you are shipwrecked," said Stephen 
Richardson, "lay down )our arms." Just 
then Trimming saw Kidd among his 
enemies, and with an oath raised his gun. 
And Richardson shot him. This ended 
resistance and the Frenchmen were 
brought off as prisoners to be turned over 
to the New London authorities. Jonathan 
did not come back in the smack ; he 
thought he ought to stay at the farm. 
And when the party came away from the 
Island Captain Kidd and the two sailors 



624 



THE TREASURE OF THE MONEY PONDS. 



were preparing to sail up the Sound in 
search of the San Antonio. 

The girls did not go back to Fishers 
Island. The events of the last twenty-four 
hours had so wrought upon them that they 
had no wish at that time to return. So in 
the afternoon they went home with Chris- 
tobel to Whitehall near the Mystic River. 
" We will go over to the Island again be- 
fore long," said Lucy, " and perhaps we 
shall see the Captain when he comes back 
from Boston." 

That night at Whitehall three eager 
girls read by the candle light the paper 
which had been given them by Captain 
Kidd. One was an inventory of the 
treasure buried in the chest. And this is 
what was written : 

" Treasure buried in Iron Chest on 
Fishers Island by Captain William Kidd.' 
i bag dust gold, . . . 57 oz. 
1 bag coined gold, . . . 126 oz. 
1 bag gold bars, . . . 201 oz. 
1 bag unpolished stones, . 44 oz. 

1 bag polished stones, . . 27 oz. 
1 bag pearls, . . . . 1 1 oz. 

On the other paper was a rude drawing 
and the following directions : 

"Circle north shore of pond till middle 
of entrance bears south-east. Three hun- 
dred yards north-north-west is big bowlder 
with gnarled scrub oak. Set compass on 
flat top of rock and run line due north 
thirty fathoms. Dig for iron chest." 

The girls planned returning to the Island 



the next week, to visit the Money Ponds 
— as they began to call them — and see 
where the treasure was buried. But the 
next day Jonathan Rose brought the 
alarming news that the French fleet had 
come back and in retaliation for the cap- 
ture of Trimming's party had burned the 
old farm house to the ground. So the 
girls' plans fell through. 

Captain Kidd did not come back from 
Boston. Rumor said he was a pirate, 
that his sloop and goods had been confis- 
cated, and that he had been sent to Eng- 
land for trial in His Majesty's ship 
Rochester. In course of time all the 
Colonies knew that Kidd the Pirate had 
been hanged in London in Execution 
dock with nine of his companions. Only 
a few knew, that to shield those in higher 
place, he unjustly suffered, and that the 
evidence that would have cleared him, the 
Government purposely withheld. 

There were some who still remembered 
him as an honest man and a gallant 
officer. And how his good wife, by the 
help of his faithful friend Robert Living- 
stone, secured the treasure of the Money 
Ponds — rightfully her own, and how three 
fair girls, to whom the secret had been 
entrusted, obtained their promised dowry 
— these things have not been told. They 
were exciting passages in the lives of the 
few persons concerned in them. 

But two hundred years is time enough 
for many things to be forgotten. 







THE OLD HOUSE 



BY ANNA M. TUTTLE. 




stands in idle silence by the way, 

The bare old house, neglected, gaunt and gray, 

Low settled in the turf, yet reaching high 

A sagging roof-line, bold against the sky. 
Through its uncurtained windows, dim and small, 
Moonlight and sunlight, both unheeded fall ; 

Bleared, sightless eyes, whence life has fled away ; 

No hearth fires gleam, no cheering candle ray 
Looks forth at night. The doors are barred and dumb, 
The scuttling rats retreat will answering come 

To all who knock, welcome is there no more ; 

The fallen plaster on the slanting floor, 
The unsafe stairs and beams, the steps restrain 
When peering eyes invade the still domain. 

Yet how confidingly wild roses press 

Against the window their pale loveliness ! 



The creeping gill the doorstone broiders o'er, 
And thick-ranked lilacs guard the sealed south door ; 
Lichens and moss, with tender colors faint 
The curling shingles and warped clapboards paint. 
The squirrel red upon the gable high, 
With chattered zeal reproves the passer-by ; 



625 



626 



THE OLD HOUSE. 



The phoebe bird still nests beneath the shed, 
And mice in crannies hide a tangled bed ; 
The chipmunks highways thread the rat-gnawed doors, 
The doorstone roofs his hidden winter stores ; 

Bees 'neath the clapboards dwell in honeyed calm 
And own the garden with its phlox and baim. 
The wide mouthed chimney once the heart of cheer 
Is pathway now for bats and night-winds drear ; 
There beetles hide and spiders lurk and spin, 
And circling swifts fly all day out and in, 
Weaving the azure, where the sunlight flaunts, 
With unseen meshes to their sooty haunts. 
Say not 'tis desolate, that tenants shun 
This empty shell adream there in the sun. 
Through winters cold how many creatures there 
Lie snugly curled outsleeping want and care ! 

The old house served man's purpose well, and still 
In its decay hath missions to fulfill. 

A landmark well remembered far and wide, 

Milestone and guideboard for the country side. 
About its hearth what stories old are twined ! 
How many names are with its past enshrined ! 

The loafing tramp doth doze unquestioned here, 

The artist loves to plant his easel near ; 
A harvest rich the pensive dreamer reaps, 
Embalmed in memory its image sleeps 

In absent hearts, all glorified and rare 

Enriched with charms, things half-remembered, wear. 
Why should we mourn its changes, or desire 
To see its gaunt frame feed some winter fire? 

The old find nature gentle. Bye and bye 

Low as do now its builders, it shall lie. 




THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 163S-1784. 



BY GEORGE H. EORD. 



" God sifted a whole nation that he might 
send choice grain into the wilderness." 

(Stoughton in speaking of the Pilgims.) 



IN the first record book of New Haven 
Colony the first five pages had been 
used by some merchant in London as a 
day book or journal, and begin thus ; — 
" Laus Deo, in London, the 6th of Jan- 
uary, Anno Dominae 1608." Tradition 
says that this was Governor Eaton's ledger. 
This seems quite probable, as in 1624, six- 
teen years later, found John Davenport 




BARK OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

presiding as vicar of St. Stephen's Church, 
Coleman street, London, which is in the 
immediate vicinity of the Bank of Eng- 
land. The church and parish records of 
St. Stephen's are still in existence. 

Davenport was the son of an ex- mayor 

of the town of Coventry, where his father's 

name still appears upon a shield, one of 

which was allotted to each retiring mayor, 

627 



the same being then arranged as wall 
decorations in the old Council Hall. 
Davenport was a graduate of Oxford, a 
man of great influence and a favorite with 
the merchants and artisans who dwelt in 
this section of London. His admirers 
were of that class of aggressive English- 
men whose representatives in parliament 
were constantly presenting their grievan- 
ces to King Charles I. 

Among his parishioners was Theophilus 
Eaton, a wealthy merchant of eminence 
and integrity. He was an old school- 
mate of Davenport at Coventry and one 
of his life-long friends. He with others of 
prominence, including Edward Hopkins, 
associated together in organizing a Com- 
pany to be located in New England, and 
the ship Hector was chartered to bring 
the " Companie " over. 

The knowledge that rich merchants 
were the principal members of the Com- 
pany prompted many from Kent, Surrey, 
Yorkshire and Hertfordshire to join them. 
Their numbers soon increased to that ex- 
tent that it was found necessary to charter 
an additional ship. In April, 1637, they 
sailed from the harbor of London. The 
voyage across the Atlantic in those days 
usually occupied about two months. 

Davenport and Eaton were no strangers 
to Governor Winthrop, then governor of 
Massachusetts colony, having been in cor- 



628 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-178 4. 



respondence with him for several years. 
They arrived at Boston, June 26th, 1637, 
and it is recorded : " The ship Hector 
and her Consort. We had now fair, 
sunny weather. There came a smell from 
off the shore like the smell of a garden. 
Soon we were on shore gathering native 
strawberries and feasted by friends with 
good venison, pastry and good beer." 
The Company consisted of about fifty 
heads of families, two hundred and fifty 
in all, including women, children and ser- 
vants. 

Dutch navigators as early as 16 14 made 
a map of the Connecticut coast. The 



After the founding of Plymouth in 
1620, colonization continued in the set- 
tlement of Dover in 1623, Salem in 1627, 
Charlestown in 1629, Boston in 1630, and 
the towns on the Connecticut River in 
1 633S 5- The Pequot war had made the 
English acquainted with the country west 
of the Connecticut River bounding on 
Long Island Sound. Captain Underhill 
in his history of the war refers to " that 
famous place called Queenapick (New 
Haven)" and says "it hath a fair harbor 
and abounds in rich and goodly mead- 
ows." Stoughton in his letters speaks of 
it as surpassing all the New England 





MEDAL COMMEMORATING THE SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAVEN. 



same year Captain Adrian Block (after 
whom Block Island is named) visited our 
spacious harbor in the "Onrust" (The 
Restless) which was fitted out by the East 
India Company of New Amsterdam for 
the purpose of carrying on trade in furs 
with the natives. A chart of the harbor 
as made by Block was deposited in the 
Royal Archives at The Hague. New 
Haven's site was called Rodenburg (Red 
Hills) by the Dutch navigator, probably 
because of the color of East and West 
Rocks, the noble eminences three to four 
hundred feet high so plainly visible to 
every mariner approaching the city. 



region and " probable it is that the Dutch 
will seize it if the English do not ; it is 
too good for any but friends." 

Influenced by such reports, Eaton im- 
mediately started with a committee to find 
the place. They were so pleased that 
Eaton returned to Boston leaving seven 
men to winter here while he made prepara- 
tions for the colony to arrive in the spring. 
i\lthough Governor Winthrop and his col- 
ony offered Davenport and Eaton any 
place in their jurisdiction that they might 
choose, their love of independence and a 
desire to found a separate commonwealth, 
induced them to decline this offer. Dr. 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1 



629 



>wight says of the New Haven colonists, 
they were distinguished for their excellent 
haracter," and Trumbull says " the prin- 
ipal men deserved to be at the head of 

new colony." On March 30th, 1638, 
le Company sailed from Boston, arriving 
ere in about ten days. 

Quinopiocke as spelt in the Indian 
eeds (November 28th, 1638) signifying 
t their language, long-water place, was 
ccupied by a tribe of this name. Early 
:tention was paid by the colonists to the 
taking of amicable treaties and purchases 
tat would afford them security. The 
"tides of agreement between Momaugin, 
te sachem, were in part as follows : 

" Remembring & acknowledging the 
: ;avy taxes and eminent dangers wch 
ley lately felt and feared from ye 
equotts, Mohaucks, and other Indians, 

regard to which they durst not stay in 
eir country, but were forced to flie, & 
\ seeke shelter under the English at 
onecticutt, and observing ye safety & 
Lse yt other Indians enjoy neare ye 
nglish, of which benefitt they have had a 
Dmfortable tast already since the English 
>gan to build & plant at Quinopiocke, 
aich wth all thankfullnes they now 
•knowledged. They jointly & freely 
,ve & yielded up all yr right, title and 
terest to all ye lands, rivers and ponds, 
ees with all ye libertyes & appurtenances 
longing unto ye same in Quinopiocke 

ye utmost of their bounds East, West, 
orth, South unto Theophilus Eaton, 

hn Davenport and others, the present 
iglish planters there, & to their heires 

assignes for ever, desiring from ym ye 

English planters to receive such a por- 
>n of ground on the East side of the 
arbour towards ye fort at ye mouth of 

liver of Conecticutt as might be suffi- 

?nt for them, being but few in number, 

plant in ; and yet within these iimitts 



to be hereafter assigned to them, they did 
covent & freely yield up unto ye sd 
English all the meadow ground lieing 
therein, with full liberty to chuse & cut 
downe what timber they please, for any 
use whatsoever, without any question, 
license or consent to be asked from them 
ye sd Indians, and if, after their portion 
& place be limited & set out by the 
English as above, that ye sd Indians shall 
desire to remove to any other place 
within Quinopiocke bounds, but without 
ye Iimitts assigned them, that they doe it 




IE 



Hi 



1*1 ■•*■■; 1 



NEW HAVEN COLONY HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

not without leave, neither setting up any 
wigwam, not breaking up any ground to 
plant corne, till first it be sett (ou)t «Sc 
appointed by ye forenamed English plant- 
ers for them." 

The tenor of the treaty indicated kind 
treatment of the Indians, their gratitude 
for the protection received, and their de- 
sire for its continuance. This acquisition 
of land together with the purchases made 
shortly after from Montowese, sachem of 
the country to the north, included all the 
land, now occupied by the towns of New 
Haven, East Haven, Branford, North 



630 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784. 



.mm 



111 



■ I 



n 



Mm 



a 




FIRST MEETING HOUSE IN NEW HAVEN. 

Branford, North Haven, Walling ford, 
Cheshire, Hamden, and a part of Wood- 
bridge and Bethany. The Milford pur- 
chase from Ansantawae of the Waupa- 
waugs included a strip on the west side of 
Woodbridge and Bethany. 

On the first Sabbath in New Haven 
the people assembled for divine worship 
under a large spreading oak, the location 
of which is now marked by a tablet near 
the corner of College and George streets. 
This first service was more recently com- 
memorated by the placing of a beautiful 
memorial window in the old Center 
Church in memory of the late Ezekiel H. 
Trowbridge, a descendant of one of the 
original settlers. 

The location of New Haven was chosen 
more for its commercial than agricultural 
advantages. The town is surrounded on 
three sides by hills and it is believed that 
the tide water originally flowed to the 
foot of East and West Rocks. 

The people of the new Col- 
ony were the most opulent 
body of settlers that had ar- 
rived in New England. Mr. 
Eaton and Mr. Hopkins in- 
tended to follow mercantile 
pursuits here as in London. 
They laid out the City on a 



regular plan in nine squares of equal 
size, the whole being one half mile in 
extent in each direction, the streets 
crossing at right angles. This origi- 
nal plot was bounded by what is now 
State street on the south, York street 
on the north, Grove street on the 
east, George street on the west, and 
to it was soon added a triangle 
bounded by State street, Meadow 
street, George street and Water 
street. A large open space in the 
center of the nine squares was re- 
served for a market place, which has 
been famous to the present time as 
the New Haven Green. 
Each of the eight squares for a long 
time bore the name of some one of the 
prominent persons who lived in the sec- 
tion, such as Eaton Quarter, Davenport 
Quarter, Lamberton Quarter and Newman 
Quarter. In Mr. Newman's barn the 
planters convened in June, 1639, and in a 
formal and written manner formed the 
famous " fundamentall and written con- 
stitution of New Haven Colony," which 
was subscribed to by sixty- three persons 
and soon after by forty-eight more. Mr. 
Newman's lot was at the foot of the pres- 
ent Hillhouse Avenue. The New Haven 
Historical Society building, presented by 
Mr. Henry F. English as a memorial to 
his father, the late Governor James E. 
English, stands on this historic spot. 

Besides Davenport in the original Com- 
pany was another clergyman, the Rev. 
Peter Prudden and some of his followers 
from Essex and Surrey. On Mr. Prud- 
den's arrival he occasionally preached at 




MARKS OF MOMAUGIN AND MONTOWESE. 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784. 



631 



L 



Wethersfield. A dis- 
agreement in the 
church there result- 
ed in other acces- 
sions to the Com- 
pany at New Haven, 
whereupon the 
Hertfordshire peo- 
ple who did not 
subscribe to the 
original articles in 
Robert Newman's 

barn gathered the next day and with the 
people from Wethersfield organized a 
church where they might enjoy the minis- 
try of Prndden. In the latter part of the 
year these dissenters removed to Milford. 
In the next year came Whitfield to New 
Haven with a party from Surrey. These 
were also inclined to form a little colony 
or world of their own, although friendly 
and in harmony with the New Haven and 
Milford settlers. After remaining in New 
Haven a short time they located in Guil- 
ford, where they built for their pastor in 
1640 the first stone house erected in New 
England. This ancient domicile is said 
to be the oldest in the United States and 
it is now standing in its original form. 
Recently through the efforts of the Con- 
necticut Society of the Colonial Dames of 
America the property has been purchased 
and a suitable tablet placed thereon. 

In October, 1639, tne colonists pro- 
ceeded to the choice of a Governor and 
four Deputies to assist in the affairs of the 




fe^-V 




FACSIMILES OF SIGNATURES OF DAVENPORT AND EATON. 



GOVERNOR EATON'S HOUSE. 

plantation. Mr. Eaton was unanimously 
chosen to serve one year and was contin- 
uously chosen without opposition for 
eighteen years and until his death in 1658. 
Livermore says, " next to Davenport, 
Eaton was the Father of New Haven." 
He was a men of methodical habits, dig- 
nified in his appearance, and stern in his 
commands. When some became dis- 
couraged and proposed to return to Eng- 
land, his reply was, "You may, but I shall 
die here." 

The erection of fair and stately houses, 
wherein they outdid the rest of the colo- 
nies, now occupied the colonists. Gover- 
nor Eaton's house was built in the form 
of a capital " E " with stacks of chimneys 
and twenty-one fire places. Tapestries 
adorned the walls and it was furnished 
with an abundance of rich furniture, plate, 
and fine china. This house was located 
on Elm street near Orange street. Mr. 
Davenport's house, which was just below 
on the other side of the street, was built 
in the form of a 
cross and would 
have been deemed 
commanding and 
imposing at the 
present day. It 
was removed only 
a few years ago. 
The First Presby- 
terian Church now 



632 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-7784. 



stand on this spot. One or two other 
houses of almost equal importance were 
built at about the same period. 

Ezekiel Cheever, who lived at the cor- 
ner of Grove and Church streets, opened 
a school a few months after he arrived 
and was for sixty years the most noted 
school master in New England. The 
Cheever School recently erected in this 
city is named in his honor. 



At a general court held September, 
1640, it was voted " that this town be now 
named New Haven." The records do 
not show any reason for the selection of 
the name, but it is fair to presume that 
the name was chosen in honor of the sea- 
port town of Newhaven in the south of 
England from the vicinity of which many 
of the settlers came. The forming of the 
confederation named New Haven Colony, 




west EOCK. 



Among those of the original settlers 
whose names have continued and still 
appear prominent and whose descendants 
are conspicuous representatives of the 
same name to-day, are : Ingersoll, Osborn, 
Punderson, Trowbridge, Atwater, Brew- 
ster, Kimberley, Ward, Gilbert, Rowe, 
Johnson, Clarke, Fenn, Chapman, Ford, 
Ailing, Eaton, Davenport, Beach, Good- 
year, Piatt, Baldwin, Buckingham, Fowler, 
Browne, Thompson, Hull, Sherman, Low, 
Ives, Andrews, Wheeler. 



composed of the towns of New Haven, 
Milford, Guilford, Branford, Stamford, 
and Southold, Long Island, occupied 
some four years, and the first general 
court having representatives from these 
towns was held in 1643, when it was 
agreed that none be admitted as free 
burgesses or have any vote in any election, 
except church members. About this time 
also, Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connec- 
ticut and New Haven Colony formed a 
confederation known as the United Colo- 






THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784, 



r >33 



onies of New England. 

Social distinctions were early made 
and indicated by the church seating. 
Seats were assigned with the greatest 
consideration and thoughtfulness, the 
most prominent people being seated 
in the front pews, the gradations run- 
ning down the aisle, the less prominent 
persons being assigned to the side 
aisles. In the matter of dress, while 
other colonies enforced certain regula- 
tions, the Plymouth Colony and the 
New Haven Colony avoided distinc- 
tions. It is said on this point that the 
Plymouth Colonists were too poor and 
those of the New Haven Colony too rich 
to admit of dress distinctions being 
made. 

Marriages were solemnized by a magis- 
trate and notice of the same was posted 
in some prominent place fourteen days in 
advance of the ceremony. "Labor was 
reputable and idleness was looked 
upon with suspicion" says Hollister. 
Governor Treat could, without loss of 
dignity, plow a corn field, while occupy- 
ing his high position, while Governor 
Leete kept a country store and the 
records of the town of Guilford during 
his administrations. 

They were very punctilious in regard 
to titles, although the term " Honorable " 
was unknown until 1685 and then and for 
many years was applied exclusively to 



' Kill 





itfl A h a d & a 



bebebbebbbseeebebb 
sbbbbbbsebbebebbbe 

B|Bljtlg ta ]!ilBBJB 

FIRST COEEEGE BUILDING. 



FIRST STATF HOUSE IN NEW HAVEN, ERECTED 
IN I763. 

governors. The term " Esquire " had 
the significance that it did in England, 
and implied those who possessed land or 
estates and had been liberally educated. 
" Mr." implied gentleman. To be re- 
corded as "Master" by the secretary was 
an indication of rank with respect to birth 
and education. " Goodman," a better 
sort of yeoman, was a man of good char- 
acter, who owned small estates. Military 
titles were always given, ranging from Cap- 
tain to Corporal. The term " Reverend " 
does not occur until 1670. Previous to 
that time the clergymen were addressed 
as "Mr. Pastor." 

The progressiveness of the people was 

early demonstrated and Hooker complains 

that the New Haven Colony was drawing 

accessions from the other settlements. 

Industrial laws were introduced regulating 

the rates of wages, prices and 

profits. Commodities bought in 

England were not to be sold above 

three pence profit on a shilling 

and a day's work was not to be 

less than ten hours in summer and 

eight in winter nor the recompense 

therefore more than two shillings 

in summer and twenty pence in 

winter. 

The Connecticut charter was 
granted in 1662, and the gran 



634 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784.. 



was so extensive and unlimited that it in- 
cluded the New Haven Colony as well as 
the Connecticut settlement. For three 
years the New Haven and the Connecticut 
colonies discussed the union of the two 
organizations, after which an agreement 
was finally arrived at, which provided that 
each town in each colony should send two 
representatives each year to the general 
court. 

Upon the union of the Connecticut and 
New Haven Colonies in 1665, it was 



were issued to apprehend the judges that 
had condemned Charles I to execution. 
One of these judges was Edward Whalley, 
descendant of an ancient family, a cousin 
of Oliver Cromwell, and who served as a 
Major-General under him. Cromwell so 
confided in him that he commended the 
person of King Charles I to his care after 
the King was deprived of liberty and was 
confined in Carrisbrook Castle, Isle of 
Wight. William Goffe, another of the 
regicides, was an officer in the army, with 




JUDGKS' CAVE. 




agreed that a General Court (legislature) 
should be held in Hartford in the month 
of May and in New Haven in October. 
This practice was continued until 181 8, 
after which the legislature met annually, 
alternately at New Haven and Hartford 
until 1874. For a long time the upper 
house of the legislature met in the hall of 
the first college building. 

Upon the death of Cromwell and the 
restoration of the monarchv, warrants 



the rank of General, and was son in law 
of Whalley and both were members of the 
House of Lords. They, together with 
others, signed the death warrant of 
Charles I, the original of which may now 
be seen in the Tower of London and a 
facsimile of which is in the possession of 
Yale University. 

Escaping from London under assumed 
names they landed at Boston in 1660. 
Deeming it unsafe for them there they 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784. 



C35 



departed and soon found 
friends among the ministers 
and magistrates of New 
Haven Colony, who secreted 
them so far as it was con- 
sistent, and several messen- 
gers were sent from Eng- 
land to apprehend them 
and great rewards were 
offered. At various times 
they were said to have been 
secreted in Davenport's 
cellar and to have lived be- 
tween a formation of rocks 
long known as Judges' Cave 
on West Rock, where they 
were provided with food by 
Richard Sperry who lived at 
the old Sperry homestead 
in Woodbridge. This 
Sperry was an ancestor of the present 
member of Congress from this district, 
Hon. N. D. Sperry. Other places of 
their abode were a locality called the 
"Lodge" and " Hatchett Harbor" not 
far from each other and about three 
miles from the Cave. From these spots, 
as from the Cave also, a full view of the 
harbor was obtained. 

The regicides lived in this way some 







TABLET ON ROCK, JUDGES' CAVE. 
(Placed by Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Connecticut.) 





/^W^lWl 




SIGNATURES OF GOFF, WHAEEEY AND DIXWELL 
FROM A FACSIMILE OF THE DEATH WAR- 
RANT OF CHAREES I. IN POSSES- 
SION OF YAEE UNIVERSITY. 



six months and then went to the town of 
Milford where they secreted themselves 
for two years. The supposition is 
that they were buried in the rear of 
Center Church, New Haven, and this 
view is strongly confirmed by three head 
stones there bearing their initials but 
historians differ on the subject. " Ebene- 
zer " was the scriptural title that they 
gave to their several places of abode. 

The date of the arrival of Capt. 
John Dixwell, an officer and mem- 
ber of Parliament from Kent, 
another of King Charles' judges, is 
unknown. He first appears in 
Hadley, Massachusetts where he 
was known to Goffe and Whalley un- 
der the assumed name of James 
Davids. A few years later he moved 
to New Haven where he was con- 
spicuous for fifteen years, being of 
dignified and military bearing and 
having the reputation of being a 
very learned man. He was in- 
timate with Rev. James Pierpont, 
and a frequent visitor at his house, 



636 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784. 



which was located where Ex-Gov. Charles 
R. Ingersoll now lives, corner of Elm and 
Temple streets. Dixwell was buried in 
the rear of Center Church, where his 
monument now stands, erected by his 
descendants. The only son of John 
Dixwell was a silversmith in Boston in 
1707 and became a merchant of influence 
and some old and valued pieces of plate 
in possession of Harvard College bear 
his mark. 



up and every one of the Colonists was 
required to have a gun and a fixed 
quantity of powder. It was voted that 
" New Haven raise a flying army." 

Robert Treat, although of Milford, 
received the commission of Major and 
commanded the New Haven quota dur- 
ing the French and Indian wars. This 
was the first regiment of militia organized 
in New Haven Colony and was made up 
mostly of men from New Haven. This 






&m% 




EAST ROCK. 



In 1 67 1 depredations by the French 
and Indians filled the New Haven 
colonists with alarm. According to the 
custom of the country towns in England, 
the churches were the armories and the 
town armor and ammunition were kept in 
church edifices for security. The hostile 
Indians came down the Connecticut 
River and for defense against them, 
trenches were dug and earth works thrown 



organization, with headquarters at New 
Haven, has been kept up from then until 
now and it is fair to presume that Robert 
Treat was the first commander of what is 
now the Second Regiment C. N. G. 

David Wooster of New Haven (after 
whom Wooster Square is named) appears 
as captain, participating in Indian 
wars, also in the seige at Louisburg, 
afterwards becoming general of the 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784, 



637 




ARMORY SECOND CO. GOVERNOR'S FOOT GUARDS 



Connecticut forces in the war of the 
Revolution, while Treat became deputy 
governor and governor of the State, 
filling the two offices successively for a 
period of more than thirty years. 

As early as 1650 Davenport urged the 
establishment of a college and for this 
object the town of New Haven made a 
donation of land, Milford gave one hun- 
dred pounds sterling and Governor 
Hopkins of the Connecticut Colony, son- 
in-law of Governor Eaton, gave in 1658, 
five hundred pounds, and a school was 
erected for " teaching Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew and the education of youth in 
good literature to fit them for services in 
Church and the Commonwealth." Hop- 
kins died in London and bequeathed his 
estate to trustees for the foundation 
of the present Hopkins Grammar School. 

In 1700 ten of the principal ministers 
in the colony met and determined to 
found a college. At their next meeting 
in Branford each of them brought a num- 
ber of books and presented them with 
these words ; — " I give these books for 

43 



the founding of a College 
in this Colony." In 1701 
the assembly granted a 
charter and determined 
that the school should be at 
Saybrook. In 1716 the 
trustees voted to move the 
school to New Haven, and 
in 171 7 ordered a college 
building to be erected. 
Great excitement was 
created in the colony by 
the moving of the college 
from Saybrook to New 
Haven and a sheriff with a 
warrant was ordered to 
bring the books. Resist- 
ance was offered and he 
procured carts to carry the 
books to New Haven. 
On the journey over night horses were 
let loose, harnesses were cut, wagons were 
broken and bridges were burned. On 
the sheriff's arrival at New Haven one- 
half of the volumes were missing, but the 
laudable ambitions of Eaton, Hopkins 
and Davenport were realized. 

Elihu Yale, (son of David and grand - 




V IB 



eeihu vale; original in possession 
of yaee university. 



638 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN i6jS-i^ 4 . 



son of Gov. Eiton) was born in New 
Haven in 1648 but returned to England 
at ten years of age and afterwards went 
to Hindoostan where he was made 
Governor of Madras and where he ac- 
quired a large fortune. From there he 
sent several donations to the College. 
In gratitude the trustees named the 
College "Yale." The first college build- 
ing was built of wood, painted blue and 



~'?-^$W$ : 3t' 




ERAL DAVID WOOSTKR. 



was 178 feet long, 22 feet wide and three 

stories high, and cost one thousand 

pounds sterling. The building stood on 

the former site of Yale's old South 

College, now partially occupied by Van- 

derbilt Hall. Yale died in 1721 and the 

inscription on his tomb reads in part as 

follows : — 

" Born in America, in Burope bred, 
In Afric travelled and in Asia wed, 
Where long he lived and thrived ; 
In London dead." 



In 1720 Mr. Trowbridge mentions 
New Haven as having trade with the 
West Indies and the Azores, At this 
time there were two hundred and twenty- 
five buildings and fourteen hundred 
people. Forty years later thirty ships 
were registered at this port engaged in 
exporting flax, wheat, rye, corn, oxen and 
horses and New Haven was designated 
as the wealthiest and most prosperous 
town in the colony. 

James Parker was the first 
postmaster and was ap- 
pointed by Benjamin Frank- 
lin in 1754. The same year 
a printing office was estab- 
lished and the first produc- 
tion was the printing of the 
laws of Yale College in 
Latin. In the year follow- 
ing the first newspaper was 
established. It was called 
t h e Connecticut Gazette, 
afterwards the Connecticut 
Journal and is now the New 
Haven Journal and Courier. 
The first oyster laws were 
made in 1762 and the regu- 
lation of this industry has 
been the subject of continu- 
ous legislation from then 
until the present time. The 
rent of oyster- shell field it 
was voted " should always 
be devoted to the use of the 
schools for the educating of 
children of Congregational and Presb}- 
terian parents only, and to no other use 
whatsoever forever hereafter." The fol- 
lowing year the new State House was 
built on the site now occupied by 
Trinity Church and a whipping post 
was set up near by. 

In 1 761, on the ascension to the throne 
of George III, a meeting was held on the 
New Haven green, cannons were fired, 
huzzahs were given and " God save the 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1 638-1 784. 



639 



King," was sung. A grand dinner was 
also indulged in by the dignitaries. 
When the obnoxious Stamp Act was 
passed Jared IngersolL although laboring 
to prevent its passage at the Court of 
King George, was in 1765 sent home as 
stamp distributor. On his arrival he 
found public sentiment so strong against 
the method in question that he was 
practically forced to resign. He, how- 
ever, appears to have regained the con- 
fidence of his associates for his name 
soon appears with that of Roger Sherman 
and thirty others who were chosen to 
consider the commer- 
cial interests of New 
Haven, The prom- 
inent men of means in 
New England however 
from John Hancock down 
had the reputation of 
being exceedingly 
loyal to the crown. 
Hollister says, "that 
in the first act of 



ington in New Haven in r 7 75 on his 
way to take command of the Con- 
tinental forces before Boston, this com- 
pany acted as his escort. On the in- 
vasion of New Haven in 1779 they 
marched to Milford Hill, which over- 
looks New Haven harbor. They acted 
also as escort to Gen. Lafayette when on 
his visit to America in 1824 he passed 
through New Haven. From the ranks of 
this company men have served in the 
war of the Revolution, the war of 1812, 
the Mexican war, the Civil war 1861-1865, 
and the Spanish war of 1898. The 



R e vol ut ion 
Haven led the 
in sympathy 
Boston. 

The Second 
pany Governor's 



N e w 

state 

with 



Com- 
Foot 

Guards, organized in 
1774 with Benedict Arnold as captain, 
was among the first to march to Lex- 
ington and Concord. They were fifty 
strong and it is said that they were the 
first military company in the country 
to declare as a body armed resistance 
to the authority of the English govern- 
ment. On their arrival the company 
was the only one on the ground complete 
with uniform and equipment. Owing to 
their soldier-like appearance, military 
movements and equipments they were 
observed and were given great con- 
sideration. Upon the arrival of Wash- 




TABEET ON SITE OF FORT WOOSTER, BEACON HIEE- 



present company is commanded by 
Major Edward M. Clark. 

From the beginning of the Revolution 
the inhabitants of the town had shared 
in the general excitement and anxiety 
that had pervaded the entire country and 
had contributed freely of men and means, 
while the influence of patriots like Roger 
Sherman had not only inspired the people 
but had emphasized the prominence that 
the town occupied in the conflict. A few 
months after the Foot Guards marched 
to Lexington, Gen. David Wooster, a 
resident of the town, raised a regimen: 



640 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 163Z-1784. 



and marshalled them on the green in 
front of the present Center Church, send- 
ing for his pastor, the Rev. Jonathan 
Edwards, to offer a prayer before their 
departure. When informed that the min- 
ister was absent, Col. Wooster stepped in 
front of the pulpit and offered an earnest 
petition for the success of the cause and 
the men of his command. Filing out of 
the church the command was given to 
march for their destination, New York 







PROPOSED MONUMENT TO COMMEMORATE THE DEFENSE OF WEST 
BRIDGE AGAINST THE BRITISH TROOPS, JUEY, 5, 1779. 



City. Later on, having returned from 
this campaign, the British troops invaded 
Fairfield County. Wooster hastened to 
the assistance of his compatriots and re- 
ceived his death wound at Ridgefield in 

1777. 

For the next two years this immediate 
vicinity was free from hostile demonstra- 
tion, although at an early period a beacon 
had been ordered on Indian Hill in 



charge of Col. Fitch, under whose written 
orders only it was to be fired in the event 
of an alarm. 

The great assistance that Connecticut 
had rendered in the struggle for liberty, 
it having furnished more troops in pro- 
portion to its population than any other 
colony, attracted the attention of the 
British commander, Sir Henry Clinton, 
who had headquarters at New York City, 
and he undoubtedly decided to punish 
the colonists in 
this locality. He 
therefore fitted out 
an expedition of 
from three to five 
thousand men a- 
gainst New Haven, 
under Gen. Tryon 
and Gen. Garth, 
which appeared in 
our harbor, the 
troops being 
landed on the 
West Haven shore 
at Savin Rock, and 
on the East Haven 
shore a t South 
End and Fort 
Flale. From these 
points they began 
their march upon 
the town before 
sunrise on the 
morning of July 
5th, 1779. 
Resistance was made near Beacon Hill, 
now Fort Wooster Park, on the east, and 
Milford Hill and West Bridge on the 
west. It was on Milford Hill that Adj. 
Campbell, of the British army, was killed, 
after having saved the life of the Rev. 
Mr. Williston, of West Haven. In recog- 
nition of the major's humane act, a 
modest, but appropriate monument to 
mark his grave was erected a few years 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 1638-1784. 



641 




JAMES HIUUHOUSE. 

since on the spot where he fell. With 
a small force, hastily gathered, Lieut. 
Colonel Sabin, Capt. James Hillhouse 
and Capt. Phineas Bradley, together with 
Rev. Mr. Napthali Daggett (for a time 
President of Yale College, who had gath- 
ered a band of students) marched to 
assist in interrupting the progress of the 
British. Making a stand on the opposite 
side of West Bridge and mounting a field 
piece they peppered away at the advanc- 
ing columns. It was here that Rev. Dr. 
Daggett was wounded while he was in 
close quarters with a British officer who 
called to him, " What are you doing, you 
old fool, firing on his majesty's troops? " 
"Exercising the right of war" was the 
characteristic reply of the old gentleman. 
The British outnumbered the Yankees 
ten to one and retreat being necessary, 
the bridge was recrossed and destroyed 
and a further stand was made at the junc- 
tion of Davenport, Columbus and Con- 
gress avenues. A monument is to be 
erected on this triangle in the near future 



by the historical and patriotic societies. 
The British entered the town through 
Hotchkisstown, now Westville. Another 
stand was made on the corner of York 
and Chapel streets, another in Broadway, 
where Capt. John Gilbert was shot dead, 
at the head of his company from Hamden. 
The town at this time included what are 
now North Haven, East Haven, Hamden 
and a part of Orange. Patriots from 
North Haven and East Haven had gath- 
ered unorganized in the vicinity of Beacon 
Hill and a brave resistance was made. 
In recognition of their deeds a tablet was 
placed upon the spot in 1895 by the Con- 
necticut Sons of the American Revolution 
under the auspices of the General David 
Humphreys Branch, Number One, of 
New Haven. The town was for two days 
in complete control of the British, the 
officers being quartered at the house of 
Isaac Beers, corner of Chapel and Col- 
lege streets, where the New Haven House 
now stands. This being a commercial 
town, large quantities of rum and wine 
were stored in the cellars, which the 
British soldiers indulged in freely, and 
the hospitality of the people and influence 
of the tories and the collecting of the 
militia in large numbers from the sur- 
rounding country who were crowding the 
invaders saved the town ; and it is re- 
corded that although it was intended to 
burn the place, Gen. Garth when shown 
its beauty from the belfry of the State 
House said, " 'tis too pretty a town to 
burn." The British loss is reported to 
have been about seventy killed, while 
twenty-nine residents were killed and 
seventeen wounded, three of the killed 
being of the name of Hotchkiss, ancestors 
of the prominent families bearing that 
name, now residing in the city. On the 
night of the second day the British em- 
barked, taking away with them several 
prisoners. 



642 



THE TOWN OF NEW HAVEN 163 8-1 7 8 4. 



Among the killed, wounded and pris- 
oners appear the names of English, 
Thompson, Bradley, Baldwin, Tuttle, 
Pardee, Parker, Ludington, Beers, Good- 
rich, Whitney, Townsend, Bassett, Sher- 
man, and others. Among the names 
recorded as assisting by diplomacy and 
service in protecting the town appear 
those of Munson, Ives, Hubbard, Whit- 
ney, Atwater, Mansfield, Doolittle and 
Beecher. Descendants of all of the above 
are now represented among our most 
substantia] citizens. 




ROGER SHERMAN. 

The close of the war was celebrated by 
a gathering on the New Haven green on 
May 1st, 1783, under Rev. Dr. Stiles, 
president of Yale. Salutes were fired, 
parades and dinners were indulged in, an 
oration was given, a hymn of thanksgiving 
was sung, and a collection for the poor 
was made " to elevate their hearts for re- 
joicing." At this time the population 
was about twenty-five hundred, while that 
of New York City was about twenty thou- 
sand. A stage for Hartford and Spring- 
field left here every Wednesday. Goods 



were for sale for cash, bank notes, Mor- 
ris's notes, Hillegas' notes, Pickering's 
certificates, soldier's notes, state money 
and all kinds of produce. The Morris 
decimal system of the dollar was un- 
known. At a town meeting the propriety 
of admitting tories to freemanship was 
discussed with great vigor and earnest- 
ness. At last it was voted to admit those 
" of fair character who would agree to 
become good and useful members of so- 
ciety." President Stiles, evidently some- 
what distui bed), wrote in his diary, " This 
day's Town Meeting voted to readmit 
the Tories." 

In October, 1783, a petition* signed by 
two hundred and fourteen persons for 
" incorporating New Haven as a city " was 
presented to the Legislature and was 
passed by the upper house, but the lower 
house failed to concur. The following 
year, in January, at a town meeting, with 
Roger Sherman in the chair, a resolution 
was passed requesting the representatives 
to the Assembly, Capt. Henry Daggett 
and Capt. Jesse Ford to exert themselves 
that the " act be passed with all con- 
venient speed." It is evident that the 
instructions were promptly executed, as 
the following month an election for city 
officers was held. New Haven was the 
first to apply and receive a charter, in 
January, 1784, New London, Hartford, 
Norwich and Middletown, following 
shortly after. Roger Sherman, David 
Wooster and James Hillhouse had long 
cherished this charter project. What 
more fitting then, than that Roger 
Sherman, who had served nineteen 
years as a member of the Legislature, had 
been treasurer of Yale College, one of 
the five who drafted the Declaration of 
Independence, now a member of the Con- 
tinental Congress and judge of the Su- 



*Original now in State Library. 



A T THE YEARS END. 



643 



perior Court and by far the foremost 
citizen of the community, should be 
elected the first mayor of New Haven, as 



was done on February the tenth, SEVEN- 
TEEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY- 
FOUR. 





' \ m 






1 
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1 AT THE YEARS EM) 





BY ELIZABETH ALDEN CURTIS. 



Love, the years, the freighted years, 
With their laughter and their tears. 

How they fly on silent wings, 

Till the gifts one season brings 



Are but mem'ries, are but dreams 
In life's seaward-going streams. 

Springtime goeth summer-questing ; 
Autumn is but summer resting ; 



644 



AT THE YEARS END. 

And the hale old winter-time 

Only autumn, cased in rime. 

Thus upon their rounds they go, 
Apple-bloom to falling snow. 






Life of season, life of man, — 

His is briefer, span for span : 

Just one youth, one age for men, 
But the year is born again. 






" His is briefer, span for span : — " 
Sweet, come closer ; say there be 

Sudden night for son of man, 
Love is for eternity. 



In the twilight of the year, 

Let us dream together, dear ; 

Dream of something lasting, good, — 
Dream of Love and Brotherhood. 





1. 



jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjj_.j... 









r 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



FALLING SECTION OF THE STEEPLE OF THE PEARL 
STREET CHURCH, HARTFORD. 



AS previously noted in a short sketch 
upon the Pearl Street Church in 
our August number, this year, the build- 
ing of the church was begun in 1851 and 
finished in 1852. Thus for nearly half a 



century the spire has been a conspicuous 
landmark in the city. Upon the razing 
of the building last August, much interest 
was manifested among the citizens, 
especially in the tearing down of the 




PEARIv STREET CHURCH FROM MAIN, BEFORE CONNECTICUT 
MUTUAE BUIEDING WAS ERECTED. 



645 



646 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



..'.■.. ■ ■■■ . 



STKEPIvE JACK" AT 
WORK. 



I • ' 





-,;/*r*- '^lt : - ■■■:■,- 



Copyright by Dr. J. E. Root. 



steeple and for days there were 
many spectators constantly on 
hand watching the workmen mak- 
ing the preparations. When on 
August 25th, it was announced 
that the steeple would be brought 
down the next day, there was the 
greatest interest manifested and 
the streets surrounding were 
crowded. 

The spire was two hundred and 
twelve feet in height and the fall- 
ing section forty feet. A tier of 
stones on the northeast side was 
removed and replaced by a jack 
and block, followed by the re- 
moval of one-half the diameter of 
the spire at the base of the block. 
A heavy rope and pulley had 
been attached to the top and 
when the block was blown out by 
dynamite, the upper shaft bowed 
gracefully to the earth, presenting 
one of the grandest spectacles, 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



647 




witnessed by 

thousands of 

people who had 

been watching 

and waiting for 

the culmination 

of this event for 

the previous ten 

hours. The 

photograph best 

showing this fall 

was taken from 

the roof of the 

Phoenix Mutual 

building by Dr. 

J. E. Root, who kindly gave us permission 

to use it here. 

Account of a hail storm, which fell 
on part of the towns of lebanon, boz- 
rah, and Frankltn, on the 15 th of July, 
T799; perhaps never equalled by any 
other ever known, not even in Egypt. 
By Sherman Dewey. 

An old pamphlet printed in 1 799 with 
the above title has been brought us by 
Mr. P. A. Sears of Ehnwood. It gives 
an interesting account of a most unusal 
storm of a hundred years ago. The 
author of the pamphlet vouches for its 
entire truthfulness warranting it free from 
exaggeration and partiality. He made 
most careful observations before, during 
and after the storm. He describes it as 
" perhaps never equalled since that in 
Egypt, according to the Mosaic account, 
3,290 years since." After describing 
with detail the weather conditions for 
some time previous to the storm, he says ; 
" A few minutes before seven the cloud 
exhibited a brassy appearance in the 
west. This was immediately followed by 
the rain, which poured down as if fed by 
a water spout, and lasted three or four 
minutes, when hail began to fall, larger 
than any which I had ever seen. They 



were as large as a turkey's egg, in vast 
numbers, and many were larger. Terror 
now prevaded even the brute creation ; 
every creature sought for shelter ; but our 
houses were scarce able to afford us an 
asylum from this dreadful storm. The 
hail, urged on by the rapidity of the wind, 
soon demolished the glass, and the roar 
of this tempestuous storm silenced the 
loudest thunder so that it could not be 
heard. The rain still continued. The 
lightning was incessant and seemed to 
hail mingled with fire. AM countenances 
turned pale, and every heart filled with 
sadness. The terrific sound of this war 
of elements ; the air filled with solid sub- 
stances, which cut the leaves, fruit and 
small limbs of the trees, whilst continued 
flashes of lightning tinged every thing of 
a livid appearance, added horror to the 
gloom, and filled every one with astonish- 
ment. 

" The day following was calm and 
pleasant ; but nothing appeared beautiful ; 
no tuneful bird was left to welcome in the 
cheerless day. The inhabitants of the 
airy regions fell the first victims to the 
relentless hand of disordered elements, and 
were found in the fields and w r oods, some 
dead, others with their wings broken, and 
not one to be seen or heard unhurt. The 
small animals of all kinds, who had no 
shelter, shared the same fate ; araona; 
which were fowls, pigs, &c. In many in- 
stances sheep were killed. I saw one 
that was killed ; it appeared as if struck 
on the top of the head by a hail stone, 
which beat off the skin two inches in 
length and one in breadth. No person 
was killed, for there was no one out but a 
few minutes. A Mr. Johnson was a few 
rods from his house, and before he could 
reach it he was knocked down three 
times ; a number of others were knocked 
down and bruised very much. 

" The fields of grass and grain were not 



648 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



only beaten down, but cut to pieces, and 
only fit for the hogs and cattle. In corn 
fields, which were as good as any I had 
seen this year, and which I was observing 
the same afternoon, on the day following 
not a spire was left standing, and almost 
every one cut off within four inches of the 
ground. 

" The trees are cut and bruised very 
much. Young fruit trees are almost, if 
not entirely destroyed. Peach and 
cherry trees suffered most ; many of them 
are dead already ; others I think will die, 
a great part of the bark being bruised or 
beaten off on that side toward the south. 
Some orchards are almost stripped of 
leaves, as well as fruit. Many fruit and 
forest trees are blown down. The 
shingles on the houses are split to pieces 
very much. All the glass on that side 
next the storm was broken ; and in many 
instances, the sash was not proof against 
its violence. Two barns in Bozrah were 
entirely demolished, and one unroofed. 

" The hail stones, as I have observed, 
were as large as a turkey's egg, and many 
were larger. I measured some, which 
were four inches and a quarter by five 
and a half in circumference, and were un- 
commonly hard." 

The remaining seventeen pages of the 
pamphlet are taken up with the author's 
observations upon the causes of the 
storm as he conceived them, scientifically 
considered, the probability of its being a 
judgment of heaven for the wickedness 
and thoughtlessness of men, and an 
appeal to the fortunate ones who were 
in its track to extend aid to those 
who had lost all. It is a remarkable 
account of a remarkable storm. 



The following item, relating to the 
witchcraft sensation in Connecticut, never 



before published, has been furnished us 
by Mr. C. W. Man waring. 

"A Particular Courte in Hartford uppon 
the Tryall of John Carrington, and his 
wife, 20th February 1 650-1. 

Edward Hopkins, Gov. 
John Haynes, Dept. Gov. 

MAGISTRATES. 

" Mr. Wells, Mr. Woolcott, Mr. Webster, 
Mr. Cullick, Mr. Clarke. 

JURY. 

" Mr. Phelps, Mr. Failcoat, Mr. Hollis- 
ter, David Willson, John White, Will: 
Leawis, Sam Smith, John Pratt, John 
Moore, Edw : Griswold, Steph : Hart, 
Tho : Judd. 

INDIGHTMENT. 

"John Carrington, thou art Indited by 
the name of John Carrington of 
Wethersfieid, Carpenter that not having 
the fear of God before thines eyes thou 
hast Intertained familiarity with Sathan; 
the great enemy of God and Mankind ; 
and by his help has done works above the 
course of nature for w c h : both according 
to the laws of God and the established 
laws of this common-wealth thou 
deservest to Dye. 

" The Jury finds this Inditem te against 
John Carrington the 6th of March 
1650-1." 

The same Court, time and place found 
an Indictment also against Joanne Carr- 
ington wife of John Carrington with the 
same verdict. 

"March 1652-3. Court Record. There 
was presented to this Court an Inven- 
tory of John Carrington's estate which 
is ordered to be filed but not Re- 
corded. 

"The estate presented being ^23-1 1-00 
and the debts Specified therein oweing 
by the estate is sumed up ^13-01-06." 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



649 




HARTFORD PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL. 



BY J. G. RATHBUN. 



THE early records of the colony show 
that a classical school was in 
existence in Hartford in 1638, and was 
continued under various conditions until 
1664 when Gov. Edward Hopkins gave to 
the town of Hartford ^"400 for the sup- 
port of the school, and later, with an 
endowment from the Connecticut Colony, 
and a donation of ^50 from James 
Richards it was placed on a permanent 
foundation. 

In 1798 it was incorporated under the 
name of the "Hartford Grammar School." 

The story of the preliminary steps taken 
to establish a High School, has been told 
through the public press, and in the 
Triennial Catalogue (Semi-Centennial 
Number) of the High School issued in 
1897. Suffice it to say that for eight 
years previous to 1847, the agitation was 
kept up and efforts were unrelaxed to 
establish a Public High School in 
Hartford. 

The appropriation ($12,000) made by 
the town not being sufficient to build and 
equip the new building, Messrs. Bunce, 



Robinson and Collins, contributed $2,000 
of the $2,250 needed. 

Those of us who were pupils at the 
opening of the old school at the corner of 
Asylum and Ann streets, will recollect the 
strenuous efforts of many citizens to pre- 
vent the school being located so far west, 
it being near the western boundary of the 
city proper. 

When in 1868 the present location on 
Hopkins st. (so named in honor of the 
founder of the grammar school) was select- 
ed, violent opposition was again made to 
a location so far west. 

The semi-centennial celebration of the 
Hartford Public High School has been 
postponed from time to time until the 
new addition to the main building and the 
Manual Training Department could be 
finished, and the grounds be put in 
order. 

This was completed so that the 
Alumni of the School, who gathered on 
June 9th, had an opportunity to see 
one of the most complete school buildings 
in the United States. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



THE circumstances attending the so- 
called "investigation" of the charges 
against the superintendent of the Hart 
ford County Temporary Home were un- 
satisfactory from every point of view, 
To any one who followed the proceed- 
ings in detail it was plainly evident that 
somewhere behind the scenes influences 
were at work balking a genuine inquiry, 
endeavoring to shield the accused, and 
studiously attempting to minimize the 
facts and discredit the witnesses. It is 
impossible to believe that the latter had 
concocted a wholesale scheme of false- 
hoods, for people do not indulge in that 
sort of thing unless an extremely profit- 
able result is anticipated. The charges 
were brought by citizens and employees 
who had seen or had personal knowledge 
of instances of cruel and abusive treatment 
of the childreu by the superintendent. 
But their protests and straight-forward 
testimony received scant attention or 
credit with the Board of Investigation. 
Their united evidence counted as noth- 
ing apparently against the general denial 
of all charges by the Board's highly 
favored servant. An important witness 
was effectively tampered with at a critical 
moment by a person who had no par- 
ticular right to be on the scene at all. 
This witness was induced to say she 
had previously sworn falsely, but a part 
of the " falsehood " at least was later 
admitted to be true by the accused 
official himself. The Commissioners 
swallowed denial, retraction and admis- 
sion witn wonderful docility, refused the 
remonstrants the right to ask pertinent 
questions, intimated that no arguments 
were needed or wanted, and finally re- 
turned a report exonerating and endors- 
ing the superintendent. But the whole 
affair from beginning to end had about 
it such a strong odor of Algerine white- 
650 



washing methods and French court- 
martial verdicts that some indignant 
citizens promptly appealed to the grand 
jurors of the town of East Windsor to 
take the matter up. 

With a few noticeable exceptions, the 
press of the State evinced but a languid 
interest in the affair, and editorial opinion 
took its cue from the commissioners' 
report. The significance of the incident 
lies in the fact that the pernicious canker 
of " influence " and " pull " seems to 
have eaten its way into the smallest as 
well as the greatest spheres and that not 
even the humblest public institution is 
devoid of it or can escape it. Public life 
seems to be like a house of cards : the 
whole structure will fall if a single card is 
touched. We have mixed up our 
business, social and personal relationships 
so inextricably with political and public 
affairs that to touch a single official would 
mean involving a score of others who are 
either under some obligation to him or to 
some one interested in protecting him. 
This sort of thing is going on all over the 
country in every village and town, city 
and capital, and will continue to exist so 
long as public opinion chooses to ignore 
it. Ignoring it, however, does but en- 
trench it more strongly, and when a 
change is wanted it will be no small 
matter to cleanse the Augean stables of 
our local and municipal administration. 
At present the indications are that the 
majority are willing the condition should 
continue, because they have not yet had 
their turn at getting " what there is in it." 
Every such incident as this Warehouse 
Point investigation suggests these things 
by implication. If they are untrue those 
most closely concerned ought not to fear 
or be adverse to the fullest and plainest 
disclosures. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



WRITERS FOR NEXT YEAR. 

We have secured many excellent writers 
to contribute to the magazine for 1900. Among 
them we have the pleasure of announcing the 
names of Senator Joseph R. Hawley, Chauncey 
C. Hotchkiss, the author of "A Colonial 
Free Lance," "In Defiance of the King," 
etc.; Alice Morse Earle, the well-known writer 
on Colonial subjects ; Elizabeth Alden Curtis, 
the young writer whose " One Hundred Quat- 
rains from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam" 
has won. her an enviable place in the literary 
world ; Hon. Frederick A. Betts, Charles 
Hopkins Clark, editor of the " Courant ; " 
Professor W. H. C. Pynchon of Trinity Col- 
lege. Honorable Joseph L. Barbour, Albert C. 
Bates, Librarian of the Connecticut Historical 
Society ; Rev. Dr. Edwin Pond Parker, 
Charlotte M. Holloway, Hon William A. 
King, Rev. Magee Pratt, Thomas Snell Wea- 
ver, Ellen D Learned, Rev. Charles H. 
Smith, Professor Nathan H. Allen, George N. 
Edwards, Elisha R. Newell and H. Phelps 
Arms. 

HANDSOME CALENDAR. 

The Connecticut Magazine will give 
a handsome calendar in colors with every 
yearly subscription received for 1900. The 
calendar is a work of art, and suitable to 
adorn any home. The publishers will appre- 
ciate an early renewal by subscribers. 



AN HISTORICAL ROMANCE. 

We have the good fortune to announce 
an illustrated serial story for 1900 entitled, 
" The Glebe House," to begin with the 
January number. 

The story is written especially for The 
Connecticut Magazine, by Chauncey C. 
Hotchkiss, the author of the two well known 
historical novels, " In Defiance of the King," 
and "A Colonial Free Lance," published by 
D. Appleton & Co. Mr. Hotchkiss is a con- 
tributor to Leslie's Weekly, Ainslee's Maga- 
zine and many other standard publications. 

He lived for many years in the locality 
where the events of the story transpired, and 
is thoroughly conversant with the history 
of that section. 

The story deals with a bit of hitherto un- 
written history and is founded on fact. It is 
highly fascinating and descriptive and leads 
the reader through many thr ling experi- 
ences. Mr. Hotchkiss has presented it in p 



way to nterest the young as well as the old 
We anticipate an unusual demand for next 
year's numbers and would advise an early 
renewal to those wishing to obtain the story 
complete. 

BOOKS FOR THE HOLIDAYS. 

For the benefit of our readers who desire 
books of all kinds for the holidays, new and 
old, we take pleasure in announcing the offer 
made by the book store of Smith & Mc- 
Donough, Hartford, as follows : Until Janu- 
ary 1 st, they offer any book or calendar in 
their varied stock 20 per cent, below the regu- 
lar retail price. Among the books displayed 
are the following : The Education of Mr. 
Tripp, C. D. Gibson ; Via Crucis, F. Marion 
Crawford ; When Knighthood was in Flower, 
Edwin Caspoden ; Manders, Elwyn Barron ; 
The Market Place, Harold Frederick ; Life of 
Napoleon, from Corsica to St. Helena (330 
illustrations), John L Stoddard ; The Little 
Minister, J. M. Barrie ; What is Good English 
and other essays, Harry Thurston Peet ; 
Little Novels of Italy, Maurice Hewlett ; 
Henry Worthington, Idealist, Margaret Sher- 
wood ; In India, G. W. Steevens ; Tramping 
with Tramps, Josiah Flint ; Our Lady of 
Darkness, Bernard Copes ; Raiders and Rebels 
in South Africa, Elsa Goodwin Green; A 
Gentleman Player, Robert Nelson Stephens; 
Cape of Storms, Percival Pollard ; Second 
Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, Jerome K. 
Jerome ; Kipling's Poems, Wallace Rice ; The 
Young Master of Hyson Hall, F. R. Stockton ; 
The Letters of Captain Dreyfus to His Wife, 
translated, L- G. Morean ; Richard Carvel, 
Winston Churchill ; In Connection with the 
De Willoughby Claim, Francis Hodgson Bur- 
nett ; An Ambitious Man, Ella Wheeler Wil- 
cox ; Tales of the Malayan Coast, Rounsevelle 
Wildman ; Drives and Puts, a book of golf 
stories, Walter Camp and William Brooks; 
A Cruise Under the Crescent, Chas. Warren 
Stoddard; "Patience," A Daughter of the 
Mayflower, Elizabeth W. Champney ; The 
Circle of a Century, Mrs. Burton Harrison ; 
The Light That Failed, and Child Stories, 
Rudyard Kipling ; The Knight of the Kings 
Guard, Ewan Martin; A Name to Conjure 
with, John Strange Winter ; The Lost Gold of 
the Montezumas, and Chumley's Past, W. O. 
Stoddard ; Active Service, Stephen Crane ; 
Literary Hearthstones, William Cowper ; 
Among English Hedgerows, Clifton Johnson ; 
Heirlooms in Miniature, Anne Hollingsworth 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES.— Continued. 



Wharton ; Great Pictures Described by Fam- 
ous Writers, Esther Singleton; Yale, Her 
Campus, Class Rooms and Athletics, Walter 
Camp and L. S. Welch ; How to Know Wild 
Flowers, Mrs. Wm. Starr Dana ; Janice Mere- 
dith, a story of the American Revolution, 
Paul Leister Ford ; Natural History, A. H. 
Miles; The Romance of Wild Flowers, Ed- 
ward Step, F. L. S. 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 

We have spared no pains to give our read- 
ers an interesting Christmas number. With 
a special cover, generous illustrations and 
variety of reading matter we believe it will 
find hearty approval from all the readers. 



The publishers of The Connectcut Mag- 
azine announce that, beginning with the 
January number, Mr. H. Phelps Arms will 
act as editor jointly with Mr. George C. 
Atwell. Mr. Arms has purchased an interest 
in the magazine and will give his best and 
undivided efforts towards advancing the work 
of the magazine along the lines so well laid 
out by Mr. Atwell. 



MANY INDUCEMENTS. 

Our readers are offered a great variety of 
inducements by advertisers in this issue. At 
Christmas season they are setting forth their 
best inducements. Write to thera,. purchase 
of them, and do not fail to say that The 



Connecticut [Magazine advertisement 
brought their offer to your attention. 



MORE READING THAN BEFORE. 

The publishers of The Connecticut 
Magazine, in closing the present year, have 
given their readers several hundred more 
pages of reading matter than in the year 1898. 
Our aim next year will be to still further in- 
crease it, at the same time keeping it up to a 
high standard of excellence. We promise 
our best efforts to produce an entertaining 
and instructive magazine for 1900. 



A NOVEL PRIZE CONTEST. 

Our readers cannot fail to notice the 
abundance of handsome advertising designs 
in this issue. This is largely the result of a 
series of prizes offered by The Connecticut 
Magazine for the three most attractive and 
generally meritorious advertisements appear- 
ing in this issue. Let our readers judge for 
themselves which advertisements should win 
prizes. The prizes will be awarded by three 
competent and impartial judges and the win- 
ners will be announced in a later issue. 

We originated this contest to interest our 
readers in our advertising pages — to give you 
something exceptional in way of designs, and 
in this way lead you to take advantage of the 
many inducements the advertisers are offering 
in this number. Write them, buy of them, 
and mention Connecticut Magazine. 



'And THE: wonder Op It is 




The Newest Society Fad— Collect- 
ing the Thumb Marks of Your 
Friends. Thumbs Disclose Charac- 
ter and Identity. 

Mark Twain in his delightful story of 
" Puddin 1 Head Wilson," shows how far- 
reaching the effects of such a record may be 
brought. One of the distinctive features of 
the celebra'ed Bertillon system of identifica- 
tion depends upon the lines of the thumbs. 
ANo, for many yeais, in some sections of China 
the signature of an individual was simply an 
impression of the thumb. 

A color pad with directions for 
using accompanies each Album. 

Album nicely bound in American 
Seal, (4y 2 x 7). and stamped in gold. 

Postpaid to any addres< on receipt 
of $1.00 



"THUMBS DOWN!" Everyone is Saying 
since the placing on the market of 
the new... 

THUMB-MARK ALBUM. 

The THUMB-MARK ALBUM will prove a delightful 
acquisition to you. Your friends are all of different 
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their thumbs is a sure indication of these facts. Palmists 
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palms. It is an established scientific fact that no two 
persons have the lines upon the thumbs alike. It may 
seem queer, but in nearly related personages vast differ- 
ences in markings will be seen. You will likewise find 
many points of resemblance and can find much pleasure 
in comparing the thumb-marks of your friends and 
speculating upon the resemblances and divergencies of 
their character. 

J. B. BURR & CO., 
Sole Manufacturers and Distributors, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Thumb marks of Ellen Terry and Henry Irving. 









GRIM TRUTH *-""" 



The "New England Climate Does One Thing 
For the World, at Least === It Weeds Out 
The Weak From the Strong." 

In the case of a grown person it rests with himself whether or not he will 
heed the warning of a ,4 slight cold," a "trifle of a sore throat" or a 
' ' tiny cough. " 

CHII DRFN HOWEVER » cannot be left to exercise their own judg- 
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Williams' 
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It is made from the prescription of 
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IT SHOULD BE KEPT IN THE 
HOUSE DURING EVERY MONTH 
WHICH HAS AN "R" IN IT. 



Manufactured by 



THE WILLIAMS & CARLETON CO., 

* & HARTFORD, CONN. j> * 




mmm 



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Is aimed d ; rectly against these 
very things and it hits the mark. # 



Please_mention The Connecticut MAGAZiNEfwhen you write to advertisers. 




Ages of Embroidery 
Womanhood 

Cash Prizes 

FOR 

Embroiderers 




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Shows beautiful Embroidery Work for Christmas. 

Ask for our "1900 Book." Mailed for 10 cents 
in stamps. Address 

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Offers for exchange, with cash inducements, excel- 
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For Exclusive Styles in... 

Photography go to 
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AUCTIONS 



in all p rts of 
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Sales conducted throughout the state on Real 
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JXSt AGENTS E vev 



where. 

I lie Windsor Collar & Cuff Co. 

Chicago, 111. "Windsor, Conn. 



i 5 



1 



on a COLUMBIA CHAINLESS 

there is no WASTE or ENERGY 

at any POINT IN THE CRANK REVOLUTION 




IRECT testimony is always preferable to hearsay evidence. If you desire to 
know about Bevel Gear bicycles do not ask those who have never ridden 
them or who are in any way prejudiced against them for business reasons. 
Inquire of riders of the Columbia Bevel Gear Chainless, of whom there are 
thousands throughout the country. The rapidly increasing popularity of the machine 
is easily accounted for. It is easier to take care of than the chain wheel. It has a 
longer life. There is no waste of the rider's energy, every ounce of power applied 
to the pedals being made effective, an advantage over the older type of wheel which is 

apparent the moment you mount the Chainless. In ^ = 

starting, stopping, back-pedaling, riding on levels and pv • d!^7C AA 

especially in ascending grades you will notice that the r llCC ^) J O • UU 

chainless seems to possess an activity and life of its own. " 



POPE MFG. CO. .*«.?SL i, r -Vc r « co. HARTFORD, CONN 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine \\hen you write to advertisers. 




KNIVES, FORKS, SPOONS, ETC. ARE STAMPED 
WITH THE TRADE MARK:- 

1847 Rogers Bros. @ 



COPYRIGHT 1899 BY INTERNATIONAL SILVER CO., MER1DEN, CONN.' 

A^ares Bearing these Trade Marks are Particularly Appropriate for Gifts and are made by 

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO. ( INTE cr™c?™ VER ) Meriden, Conn. 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO, 
Canada. 



NEW YORK, 
08 Fifth Ave., Madison Square. 



CO. SUCCESSOR 

SAN FRANCISCO, 

134 Sutter Street. 

SEND TO MERIDEN FOR CATALOGUE NO. 53 J. 



CHICAGO, 
147 State Street. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



IT'S A WISE PLAN TO 

ILLUSTRATE Yo n u ^.^ PROPERLY 

THE PEOPLE WANT IT- 




Portrait?. 
Advertis- 
ing, Cuts, 
Engrav- 
ing- of 
All Kinds 
for Cata-; 
logues. 
Mugford 
does it 
all. 



Specimen of our Straight Halftone Work. 

Who Can Advise, Design Illustrations, Create Printing Plates? 

A. MUGFORD, 

ENGRAVER AND ELECTROTYPER. 

New York Office— 120 Liberty St. 177 ASYLUM ST., HARTFORD, CONN. 

Room J 108— Beard Building. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




FOR SELLING OUR JEWELRY NOVELTIES. 

Watches, Cameras, Bracelets, Gold Rings, 

given away ABSOLUTELY FREE for selling our 
Jeweiry. No money required. Send us your name 
and lull address on a postal card, and we. will send you 18 
trold plate scarf and stick pins, all set with different colored 
stones, to sell for 10 cents each. The best sellers 
offered by any firm. When you have sold them we 
will send you your choice of a Watch, a solid Gold Ring 
and any other valuable premium on our larere illustrated 
list, which we send you with the pins. We pay all postage. 
NOVELTY MFG. CO.. 61 Bailey St., Attleboro, Mass. 



'^^%'%/fc/%/V*/*/^%/%%'%/%/%%/%/%^^ 




I. 




Cholly Goff : — Can you tell me if there are any ' links ' in the neighborhood ? 



LISTEN! 
$5.00 euys 

YEARS OF 

..Entertainment,. 



Make your Family 
Happy with a present I 

°' Graphophone l 

or... 

Phonograph. 




M 




The Phonograph produces Band and Orchestra Music, Male Quartets, Vocal and Instrumental Solos, Dialogues, 
Monologues, Fun and Wit in endless abundance. WRITE FOR FREE CATALOGUE. 

Hartford Graphophone Co., 

80 Trumbull St., HARTFORD, CONN. 
EDWIN T. NORTHAM, Manager. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



WOULDN'T A CAMERA 
R LEASE YOU? 

Wouldn't a camera please the one you wish to remember at 
Christmas time? Cameras are not expensive. Cameras are not 
hard to master. Snapping pictures is a past-time that never loses 
its fascination — you have something to show for it. We have 
every make of Cameras that's worthy of attention. All Eastman 
Kodaks have recently been reduced in price a full third. 

Ask for Catalogue or come and see them. 

HARVEY <& LEWIS, OPTICIANS, 355 MAIN ST. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 





Makes Home Cheerful. 

A COZY FIRE-PLACE 

WE CARRY ALL SORTS OF 

Mantels, Tiles, Fire-Places, Andirons, Etc. 

Handsome Assortment. Look them over. 

Free Catalogue. 

The Hartford Mantel and Tile Co., 

L. M. GLOVEK, Manager. 

Manufacturers and Manufacturers' Agents. 

Mosaics, Interior Marble and Slate; Gas Combination 
and Electric Light Fixtures; Fireplace Furniture of all 
Descriptions. 164 State St., Htfd., Ct. Tel. Con. 

Mantels with French Beveled 

Plate Mirrors, SI 0.00 up. 





Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when vou write to advertisers. 



FOR YOUR BOY or GIRL 



$1.00 



EDUCATES while it 

AMUSES, 

The '98 Little Giant 

Typewriter, 

The machine is practically INDESTRUCTABLE. 
SEND $1,00 and 10 cettts for postage and we 

mail you the machine; and if not satisfactory 

return in two days, by mail, and we will 

refund One Dollar. 

A. H. POMEROY, 98 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn 




The Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. 




WW. 15. CLARK, P.esident. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E. O. WEEKS, Vice- President 

A. C. ADAMS, HENRY E. EKES, Assistant Secretaries. 




TAKE ELEVATOR. 






I07t4ts, 







Wmtfordi 



ILLUSTRATORS OF THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. 




A CHEERFUL STUDY, OFFICE OR HOME 

YIELDS BETTER 

RESULTS — Literary, Business or Domestic, 

DIM LIGHTS tire the eyes, the brain, the body. 
LIGHT UP WITH 

^WELSBACH OR APOLLO^ 

INCANDESCENT LAMPS. 

Gas Bills Cut in Half. Three Time the Light. 

Portable Gas Stands, Gas-t : ght Tubing, Imported 
Shades, Globes, Mantles, Chimneys and Glass- 
ware, Lamps of every variety for use in the 
Home, the Office, the Store, Churches or Halls. 

WRITE FOR FREE DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR. 

ALFRED W. GREEN, 82 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 

Telephone 82Q-3. Open until 9 P. M. 




L 



THE 



GREAT ff>lCAN m • " 
f B W AM** PREPARED < 




J"THE CHILD OF TODAY IS THE MAN OF TOMORROW" and the strength of 
iJTHE NATION depends on the Health and Strength of its Men and Women 

HND there are more hearty, healthy men and women in this country that were raised on IMPERIAL GRANUM than 
on any other prepared food. It can be recommended as furnishing THE BEST principles of diet for BABIES, 
INVALIDS AND CONVALESCENTS praise its virtues, THE AGED also find it unequalled; and, when it 
seems impossible, a mother can often successfully nurse her child by resorting to a liberal diet of IMPERIAL 
GRANUM. It is of the greatest importance for all heads of families to know of an absolutely safe form of 
nourishment on which they can depend in the hour of need, AND IT SHOULD BE REMEMBERED 
THAT THE IMPERIAL GRANUM IS AN INVALUABLE FOOD 

IN STOMACH AND IN LUNG DISEASES In THROAT DISEASES 

INTESTINAL DISORDERS DYSPEPSIA SU RGICAL OPERATIONS 

FEVERS INANITION ACCIDENTS 

AND IN ALL CASES OF EMERGENCY 




SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE! Send Postal Card for Booklet 

THE IMPERIAL GRANUM COMPANY, - NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

1^, Shipping Depot: JOHN CARLE &. SONS, 153 Water Street, New York, n. Y. 

;Spto«Ba B3a«BBB g aBBafiB^ ^ 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




LACE CURTAINS 



FREE 



These beautiful Royal Lace Parlor Curtains are of the newest Savoy 
design, three yards long, 3G inches wide, are washable and will last a 
life time. You can get two pairs of these choice curtains, (same design ' 

as in cut"), and four beautiful Sash Curtains (one yard square each) FREE by selling our GREAT 

COLD REMEDY and HEADACHE CURE. Cures Cold in One Day! Relieves Headache at Once! We 

will give the curtains absolutely free to anyone taking advantage of the great offer we send to 

; - .*■ every person selling six boxes of our Tablets. If you agree to sell only six boxes at 25 cents a box, 

5X0! <■■] '■ write to-day and we will send the Tablets by mail postpaid. When sold, send us the money and 

<££ -■ ■ we will send four Sash Curtains, unhemmed, so they may be made to fit any window, together 

iS; ;'•■ with our offer of two complete pairs of Royal Lace Parlor Curtains, enough to furnish a room, 

' 5. same day money is received. This is a grand opportunity for ladies to beautify their homes with 

;-: fine Lace Curtains of exquisite design. All who have earned them are dei.ghted. Address: 

~" NATIONAL MEDICINE CO., lOIOChapel St., New Haven,Conn. Box 74 M 






CbeTarmington Ualley Sanatorium, &£™ 8TiU °' 



Sufferers from 
Nervous Diseases 
find this an Ideal 
Home- 




All Narcotic and Drug Habits Cured in Tliree 
Weeks by a New Methoo. 

The large, handsome house is very cheerful, airy, newly 
furnished throughout; and there are spacious verandas or. the 
first and second stones. The Farmington River winds through 
the grounds, and on all sides are beauty and quiet. The 
pure spring water is plentiful, and the air invigorating. The 
drives in all directions are unsurpassed. References from 
patients cured and other information will be cheerfully given, 
on request. Address, Dr. P. D. Peltier, Hartford, Conn. 



For Thirkers — The Number IU Puzzle. 

THE NEWEST AND PEST. 



j^^JtOPj^giSr 




Full instructions in sealed envelope with each puzzle. 
Postpaid to any address. 15 Cents. 

CHAS. B. ELMORE, DRAWER 56, - HARTFORD, CONN. 



HISHQLiNESS POPE LEO XIII 
AWARDS GOLD MEDAL 

In ^cognition ofSenelitsHeceh?ed from 






1 l 1 u M N 


Fii ." 1 1 



MARIANI WINE TONIC 

FO/?£O0r.£ftA/AfAM //££V£S 

Spec/a i Oeeep - Fo a// wno wr/fe as men /zon- 
ing //?/s paper, we sencf a doo/rconta/n/ng por- 
fra/fo an of endorsements o/Smpe/pops. £mppess, 

Pp/MCESXaPD/A/ALS* APCMB/SHOPS, &nof o/fi£f.c£/Sfffl- 

gu/snec/ personages. 
AfAfi/AA// & fa, 52 IVssr /5 T fSr. //sw/op/f. 

fOff SALE AT AU DPU66/STS £Vf/?YW//£/?E. AM/DSUBSr/rt/TES. BEH/AftEOf/M/rAr/OtfS. 

PA/f/s-4/ Bot/teyaro' Mdussmam I OMnoN-83Morf/merSf. Afo/?trea/-87Sr.JamesS/: 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



|V,V, t Vrt,.liW.i I i..r..r.............. ......... ..,,,,,.,,,,,,,. 

A USEFUL HOLIDAY PRESENT 
The SAFETY POCKET BOOK 

specie cannot lose out, contents readily seen 
nd removed when opened. Hills secure in sep- 
rate pockets from specie. Fastened by button 
u-ks. Made neat and attractive of durable leather 
The BEST Made for Gentlemen or Ladies. 
SENT PREPAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 

Men's Stylo: Seal Grain, 50c. Morocco, 75c. Real 
seal. SI. 00. Real Alligator or Pig skin. $1.50. 
Real Seal with Bill Fold, $1.25. 
Ladies' Style with card poeket : Imitation Monkey 
50c. Morocco, sterling corners, $1.60, Heal Sea 
or Alligator, $1.50, with sterling corners. V2.00 
Send for New Catalog Leather Goods for the Holidays 

ARMS POCKET BOOK COMPA!\Y, 

334 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 




Men's Safety Pocket Book. 



mmmmMmmmwmww'wmvmtmwwm 




Ladies' Safety Pocket Book 




"Standard" 

Writing Fluid 

has been officially accepted for use through- 
out Connecticut in all the Public Offices 
of the state. Business Men Like It. 

Just right for the Home. All kinds and 
colors. 

Equal to the BEST But 

25 per cent 
Cheaper. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT. 

BAIRSTOW INK CO., 

42 Union Place. Hartford, Conn. 



f 



—^What Are.... 

Rw THE CLUB 




COCKTAILS? 



Drinks that are famous the world 
over. Made from the best of liquors 
and used by thousands of men and 
women in their own homes in place of 
tonics, whose composition is unknown. 

Are they on your sideboard 

Would not such a drink put new 
life into I the tired woman -who has 
shopped all day ? Would it not be the 
drink to offer to the husband when he 
returns home after his day's business ? 

Choice of Manhattan, Martini, Tom 
or Holland Gin, Vermouth, York or 
Whiskey is offered. 



For Sale by all Fancy Grocers and Dealers 
generally, or write to.... 



Q. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO., 



Hartford, Conn. 



39 Broadway, New York. 



20 Piccadilly, W. London, Eng. \ 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Sure Pop Insect Powder 

is guaranteed to kill Cockroaches, Bed Bugs, 
Water Bugs, Etc. Prepaid to any address 
on receipt of 25 Cents. 

Adolph Isaacsen & Son, 86 Fulton Street, 
NEW YORK. 



Typewriting Machines 

Bought, Sold, Rented or Repaired 

AT THE TYPEWRITERIUM, 

J7J Broadway, New York. 



.CANT BEND E M piMS „„„ 



SELF THREADING 



^^^eedle points, black or white, worth a weak sighted or blind 
dozen papers of other pinf for collars and oan thread them, one 
all starched goods, for you oan't bend or kind thread springs in 
break them. 111. catalogue free. Sample on end ; other on side, 
package of either kind pins or needles 10c., 2 for 15c. , 4 for 25c, 12 
for 60c, postpaid. C. E. MARSHALL, Mfr., LOCKPORT, N. Y. 




TO < URE A COLD IN ONE DAY. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. 
All druggists refund the money if it fails 
to cure. 25 cents. 




Mountaineer : — Ef he keeps on up through them woods ez I tolt him to, he'll find 
lynx enuf ; one killed my four dogs up there t'other day 




Save Railroad Fare 
Order by Mail 

Christmas Surprises! Christmas Surprises! 

EVERYTHING 

in Wearing Apparel, Millinery, Music, 
Household Furnishings, Toilet Articles, 
Sporting Goods, &c, and TOYS. 

Or if you are in Hartford, A RESTAURANT 
unexcelled by any in Connecticut. 

OUR GUARANTEE:— 

If for any reason you are dissatisfied with 
your purchase, within one month thereafter, 
bring it back and we will cheerfully refund 
the money. 

Everything: sold under our guarantee 

Buy at the GREAT MODERN DEPARTMENT 
STORE. 

Honest Methods. JLowest Prices. 

Connecticut's BIG Mail Order house, 

The Sawyer Dry Goods Company, 



Main and Asylum Streets. 



Hartford, Conn, 



Christmas 
Gifts 

Diamonds, 
Watches, Fine Jewelry, 

Art Goods, 

Silverware, Cut Glass, 

Leather Goods, Etc. 



Our stock shows the immense 
preparation we have made for the 
HOLIDAY SEASON. 

Never before has our establish* 
ment been so completely filled with 
such a choice selection of useful and 
ornamental gifts. 

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOUR 
INSPECTION. 



Henry Kohn & Sons, 

Jewelers. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



i:hey 

Protect 

AND 

ADORN— 
Williams' 

FAMOUS 
URS 

*OR THE 

FINE 
IpfRADE 

Styles. 

[packets wilJ be 
I worn twenty- 
>our inches 
Bong, t-eal, 
(Persian Lamb 
Wind Astrachan 
:jire the leaders, 
jrhe Electric 
feeal Jacket will 
fill the want of 
Jhose who want 
|i warm gar- 
ment at a lower 
jigure. Eighteen to thirty inch capes will follow the 
^ollarette and boa which will be worn even in the cold 
(season over a cloth jacket. Sleeves be ng smaller, the 
ppes will not be as full as last season, and fitted over 
t;he shoulder on account of small sleeves. 

Write for Free Catalogue of Styles. 

WILLIAMS 

Carries Everything in the Shape of. . 
EVENING WRr\PS, MANTLES, 
OPERA CAPES, MUFFS t 

NhCK SCARFS, HOODS, 

TRIMMINGS, GLOVES, 

LININGS, CAPES, 




FURS 



FOR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN. 

OUR PRICES are as Lw as 

is Consistent. 

With grood work we live up to our motto 
"FINEST QU\LITY and SMALL PROFITS. 11 

We make everything in the line of furs from a 
[button to a sleigh iobe. 

ALL GENUINE. 

Our manufactory is large light, and equipped with 
all the litest improved machinery, run by electricity. 
Old Furs Repaired and Made Stylish. 




Trade Mark 
ALFRED WILLIAMS & SON, 

Manufacturing Furriers, 
to 101 Pratt St., HAKTFORD, CONN 




^> RG ^\N 



B I835 



Silver bearing the stamp "1835 R. Wallace' 
may be accepted as the standard of plated 
ware. It has ail the appearance and wearing 
qualities of solid silver. Our new patterns 

"Joan," • 'Astoria" and "Virginia," 

are of unusual beauty, and most desirable for 

Holiday Gifts. 

Elaborately illustrated catalogue No. 75 B sen 

free will help you in your selection. 

Sold by leading dealers. 

R. Wallace $ Sons mtg. Co., Ulallinaford, Conn. 

utnrps in ( ^^ York. San Francisco. 

Mores in j uMcago. London. 



A* A* Waterman 

& Go* > Boston, Mass. 
Makers of High-Grade 



SI 




Fountain Pens, m order 

to further introduce their 
Improved Pens, offer for a 
limited time to send by 
mail, safe delivery in- 
sured, one of the pens 
illustrated here ( c ut 
two-thirds size) on 
receipt of On 
Dollar. 



This 
carefully 
made and 
we -finished 
pen is guar- 
anteed against 
defects or unsatis- 
factory action. The 
gold pen is larjre 
14k. warranted, and 
has fine, medium or 
broad points. Fully 
equal to similar pens sold 
heretofore at 92. Address 
the makers or their agents 

Note the initials 

A. A. 
bpfore the name 
WATERMAN 

Colonial Pen Company, 

36 Bromfield St., Boston. 
Any BOY OR GIRL can learn 
how to earn one of these pens by 
sending full address and a 2-centstamp. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



! tti&SFJgsr CAREY'S MAGNESIA FLEXIBLE CEMENT ROOFING. 




NO LEAKY 
ROOFS 

from 

WINTER 

STORMS 

if you use Carey's 
Cement Roofing. 

It is a non-conductor 
of heat and cold, and is 
absolutely water-proof 
and fire-proof. It is very 
easily applied as the 
illustration shows. 

WITHSTANDS 

ALL THE 

ELEMENTS. 

FREE SAMPLES TO 
PROPERTY OWNERS. 



WRITE FOR SAMPLE TO 

JOHN B. CLAPP & SON, 6 1 Market St., Hartford, Conn. 



-Soprano, Centre Church Choir . 



(J&weri Soloist. ^ aZAUffELS y^rraRa.Gi^ 



Church Societies, Clubs or Fraternal Orders 
can secure the 



LEF 



MALE 
QUARTET 



for an evenings entertainment at a moderate 
price. For terms, dates, etc., address William 
Richard Griffith, 86 State &t., Hartford, Conn. 



GIVEN AWAY! 




Couches, Morris Chairs, Chiffoniers, Ladies' Desks, 
Oil Heaters, Tables Silver sets, Goid Watches and 
twenty other gifts for disposing of our five and ten 
dollar assortments or toilet articles. 



Premiums where 
Write for beautiful 



No Wait for Goods 

you may examine at our office, 
catalogue, or call afternoons. 

SHUMWAY CO., 

Room 13, Waverly Bldg., Hartford, Conn. 






M SUFFERERS FROM 
ORPHINE. 
. oitArir DRUG HABIT 

Can be permanently cured at their homes without pain, publicity or detention from business. No opiates used 
and ALL NATURAL POWERS FULLY RESTORED. Our free trial treatment alone cures hundreds of 
cases, and will be mailed free to anv person suffering from a drug habit. The only scientific home treatment con- 
taining the ACTIVE LIFE PRINCIPLE. The most difficult cases successfully treated ; perfect health restored; 
results absolutely sure. All communications strictly confidential. Address HOME TREATMENT CO., 
48 West 34th St., New York City, or J. C. McALPINE, at same address. 

What a few of oitr patients say : ** Sample just gone ; it is two weeks since I have touched the drug. r 



"1 have not used one single drop of 
the morphine, and have not suffered 
one bit ; in fact, every day have felt 
better and better." 



" I hardly know how to write you, I 
feel so grateful, so thankful. I have 
taken the medicine exactly as pre- 
scribed, and how it has helped me." 



"X am more than pleased with the 
result. I rest at night splendidly and 
have no pain. Oh, what a God-send 
to those afflicted as I have been." 



Plense mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



*>NEWY(MX:PORTO : RiCO 

/TEAM/HIP COS CRUI/E/ 






a* 



ilafia^ 





The new 3500 ton Steamers 

"PONCE" ^ "SAN JUAN" 

gives tourists an unequalled 
opportunity to visit 

PORTO RICO 

Our Country's New Colony 

The round trip can be done in about 20 days, and tourists 
can use steamers as a hotel while visiting the various pons. 

ENTIRE COST OF TRIP, 590 to 5120 

All rooms on deck amidships wnh every known comfort : 
yacht-like appoinments and furnishings— perfect service. 

Second Cabin Rates, $55 to $90 

Send for beautifully illustrated book on Porto Rico. 

MILLER, BULL & KNOWLTON 

General Agents 
32 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



' ■ i«£SK^ 



Presbrey Aoyg.Jgeticy A'- v. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers 



'*■"" : — ™ 



3piE 



SMITH PREMIER TYPEWRITER 

4 SEASONABLE. SERVICEABLE, 



SENSIBLE 




CATALOGUE 
FREE. 



w*Smith Premier lYPWRijmfa 

SYRACUSE, N.YVS.Ji. \ 



MUNSON LINE STEAMSHIPS 




«»™c 




FINE FULL-POWERED STEAMSHIPS 

WEEKLY SAILINGS TO 
Matanzas Nuevitas 

Cardenas Gibara 

Sagua La Grande Peurto Padre 

Caibaritn Baracoa 

OFFERING 

..A Delightful Winter Cruise.. 

To the Chief Ports of the North Shore of Cuba. 

THE QUEEN OF THE ANTILLES. 

For Illustrated Literature, Rates, Reservations, Etc., address 
W. D. Munson. Genl. At, 2 William St., New York. 

Raymond & Whitcomb, Ticket Agents, 

25 Union Square, New York. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




CLYDE LINE 



AND JACKSONVILLE 

FLORIDA 

Fast Modern ®\|® Three Weekly 
Steamships, I Sailings, 
From Fier45KR.NewYork. 

RAIL CONNECTIONS TO ALL SOUTHERN RESORTS 




WF^t 




T iliSu a u&&&R' I 5 B OWLING GREEK NEW YORK I w 5^ &h. Y A D , E e M. a 




A. P. LANE t N. E. Agent, 201 Washington Street, BOSTON. 



TO NEW YORK DAILY. 




DIRECT ROUTE to the WEST 

with only one change of cars between 
Hartford and Chicago. 



Stopping at all Connecticut River I andings. 



LOW RATES. 


SECURITY. 


Quick Dispatch. 


COMFORT. 


Passenger and 
Freight Line. 


REFRESHING 
SLEEP. 



Passenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. m. and 
forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecticut river, and 
points North, East and West from Hartford. We also have 
through traffic arrangements with lines out of New York or 
points South and West, and shipments can be forwarded on 
through rates, ard Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the 
Company. For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co. 

Steamers "Middle'town" and "Hartfokd"'— Leave Hart- 
ford from foot State St. at 5 p.m.— Leave New York from Pier 
24, East River, at 5 p. m.— Daily except Sundays. 




The shortest, cheapest and most convenient route. 
Train haves Har.ford at 12 40 P. W., connects at 
Campbell Hall with fast express over O. W . and 
Wabash road, arriving at Chicago mxt day 9 P. M. 
Only one night on road. 

CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY, 

Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. 

For information apply to 

W. J. MARTIN, GenM Passenger Agent, 
Hartford, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



BURCH 

9 1 Asylum St. 

RUBBER STAMPS 
Steel Stamps, Stencils. 

Dating Stamps, Numberers, 

Check Punches, etc. 

Mail orders promptly filled. Catalogue free. 
Telephone Connection. 




The old 



L*ri LI 1 to » 

Skin deep " is a trite though doubtless a true saying. 
However this may be, it is an absolute certainty that 
TRYPHENA TOILET CREAM gives a skin of 
child-like purity. It feeds and nourishes impoverished, 
shrunken skin and cellular tissues. Ensures a perfect 
complexion. Banishes all imperfections. Cures all skin 
diseases. A dainty toilet necessity of surpassing lux- 
ury and incomparable richness. Sample box sent free. 
FOWLER, Manufacturing Chemist, MOODUS, CONN. 



III. 




And Cholly found the ' Lynx ' 



W. R. Cook. 




s._!_J'Li , _> > 



lllif 



The J. J. Elliott Hall Clocks 



THE CELEBRATED ELLIOTT QUARTER CHIMING AND 
STRIKING HALL CLOCKS, of London, England are dignified 
and useful articles of furnishing for the halls of fine homes. These 
clocks are mide by hind and therefore surpiss all others. They have a 
world-wide reputation and are not only most excellent in mechanism and 
finish but the chimes are particularly sonorous and beautiful while the cases 
which are of Oak and Mahogany are designed in the best of taste. 

CHIMING CLOCKS with half hour and hour strikes, 
OFFICE CLOCKS. 



A List of CHRISTMAS-GIFT Thoughts. 



For Ladies: — 

Diamonds in all Settings, Watches, Neck 
Chains, Bracelets, Toilet Goods, Stick Pins, 
Opera Glasses, Jewel Cases, Chatelaine Bags, 
Lorgnettes, I'icture Frames, Candleabras, 
Umorellas, Charing Dishes, Cut Glass, Ster- 
ling Silver Novelties, 



For Gentlemen: — 

Watches and Chains, Diamonds, Scarf 
Pins, Link Buttons, Gold Fobs, Hat, Clothes 
and Hair Brushes, Medicine Cases, Fla ks, 
Cigar Lighters, Cigar Holders, Cigar Cutters, 
Cork Screws, Silver Mounted Tankards and 
Loving Cups, Pipes, Desk Furnishings, 
Umbrellas, Walking Sticks. 



Hansel, Sloan $ g<x 

Jewelers anfl Silversmiths, 
$$6 main Street 



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Diamond Worshipers are 
Waging War 



01 r ER tliis handsome product of the great South African 
mines. Profit by our advice and purchase before the 
price advances. See our SPARKLING ARRAY OF 
GENUINE STONES. May we suggest Handsome 
House Lamps with Jeweled Dome Shades. Watches, Cut 
Glass and Dainty Holiday Novelties in all kinds of Jewelry 
for the J-'ine Trade. 



C. H. CASE & CO., 

83/ Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 



Lighting Up 


EVI 


your ADVERTISING 
space is our business. 
The illustrations we 
design light up your 
ad. and force atten- 
tion to your business 
story. 


BP 


Robt. Weller Jr. 
& Co., 


Hi 


Designers, 
Illustrators, 
Engravers, 
Ad. Writers. 
180 Asylum Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 
'Phone, 978. 




Design by Conn. Magazine Co. 



JACOBS' 

SWJEKTS 
for your 
Sweet Heart. 
Caramels and 
Chocolates. 
Ice Cream, 
Fancy Cakes, 
Bon Bons, <fcc. 
Novelties and 
Favors lor 
Christmas. 
Mail and Ex- 
press orders 
promptly 
attended to. 
Telephone 
259. 

J 4 COBS, 

941 Main St,, 
HABTFOKD, 

CONN. 




Whitmans 



The favorite forfeit 
for a game <T Philo- 
pena. The favorite 
gift for X-mas time, 
appropriate for any 
time, is a box of Whit- 
man's Chocolates 
and Confections. 
Sold everywhere. 



Chocolates 

and 

Confections 



Whitman's 

Instantaneous 

Chocolate 

Made instantly with ^ 

boiling milk. 

STEPHEN F.WHITMAN 

AND SON, 

1316 Chestnut Street. 

Philadelphia. 



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Hartford 

Steam 

Boiler 

Inspection 

and 
Insurance 
Company, 



Hartford, 
Conn. 




J. M. ALLEN, President. 

WM. B. FRANKLIN, Vice-President 

F. B. ALLEN, Second Vice-President. 



J. B. PIERCE, Secretary. 

L. B. BRAINERD, Treasurer. 

L. F. MIDDLEBROOK, Asst. Secretary. 




PICTURES are g° od Advertisin g- 

We make Sharp, Clear, Half-tonew. 
Special Designs for advertisers, etc. 

STODDARD ENGRAVING CO.. 

747 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conn. 



CALL YOUR BOY, 

STOP YOUR CAR, 

or CUT YOUR CICAR 

with.,.. BILLINGS' Gombined 

Whistle and Gipr Cutter. 

Best Workmanship. 







Just the thing for a little Christmas Present. Handy in 
the home. Just right for the pocket. Sent to any address 
postpaid on receipt of 50 Cents in silver or stamps. 

::;i'^ YOUR KEYS 

IF YOU USE 




The best Key Ring in the world. Sent postage^paid 
to any address on receipt of 12 cents in stamps. 

Address: C. E. Billings, Dept. C, Htfd., Conn. 



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Competition has never 
caused us to lower our 
standard of excellence 

•SOLD BY LEAD/NO DEALERS 

W£Fl/RNACF CO. <^^ 

Makers of the celebrated maqee heaters, also., . . . 

B03TQ/V:, 



sssilll 



ORIGINAL DESIGNS 
FOR ADVERTISERS 



FREE 



The Connecticut Magazine offers the 
services of its artist and designer in 
helping its advertisers construct 
proper and attractive advertisements. 

Magazine advertisements will per- 
mit of illustration in half-tone or line 
work on account of the superior 
quality of the paper used. 

To advertisers taking a six month's 
contract we will make an appropriate 
design and submit to advertiser for 
approval; make a half-tone or line 
printing plate — and write the adver- 
tisement if it is desired : Cut to be 
property of owner at expiration of 
contract. This all free of charge in 
order to bring the advertiser the best 
possible results and to make our 
advertising pages attractive. 

THE 

CONNECTICUT 

MAGAZINE. 



pR^SIDETNi: 




SUSEENDER 

Made upon the right 
principle for comfort, 
style and service. 
Xo leather to stain the 
clothing : adjusts front 
and back ; fits and sat- 
isfies every one who wears 
./ it. The inventor of the 
President Suspender has 
skilfully combined in it every 
;' desirable feature, making it the 
I most practical and stylish sus- 
pender ever offered. 
If tout dealer does not have them 
we will send von a pair for 50 eis. 
C.A.EBO VkTOXMFG.CO. 
Box 132 Shirley, M.ass. 



14 inches lone, crowds in 
ChimneT. fills space, polishes brizht^ Sample 10 cents. 1 doi. &*., postpaid. 
3 doi. li.00. or 12 doi. for $3.60 b> eip Acents make big pay. 111. Cataloeu* 
0f>'0Telties,Tricks,Wig3i Plays free. C. E. MARSHALL,Mfr.,Lockport,>\T. 




18 bEAUTIFUL 

PHOTO ENGRAVINGS 

IN TINTS. 

Illustrating the 32- 
page booklet "Ihe 
Lord's Prayer in the 
Sign Language." 
"V\ ill interest young 
cr old. Primed on 
finest quality coated 
paper. Postpaid to 
i.ny addiess, 15cts. 

Conn, Magazine Co., 
Hartford, Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




a 



lUbat Rookwood T$" 



The "Rookwood" Pottery is 
an independant American indus- 
trial Art establishment of the first 
rank, they have never wavered 
from their first object of producing 
a most artistic ceramic work which 
should be a credit to the countiy. 
Outside of Japan and China we do 
not know if any color or glaze are 
to be found finer than those pro- 
duced at their pottery. They have 
attracted the attention of connois- 
seurs and potters 
the world over, es- 
pecially the glaze 
known as the 
" Tiger Eye " may 
be recorded as a 
chef-d'oeuvre of 
ceramic cut. You 
may handle and 
examine any piece 
of the ware, with 
but few exceptions 
and derive the keenest satisfaction in doing so. The decorative subjects 
arc well chosen, admirably fitted to the form, and while treated with 
perfect accuracy of drawing, they suggest rather than display meaning. 
The colorings are soft, subdued and rich, a wonderful effect is de- 
rived in them by the harmonious arrangement of colors, in refined gra- 
dation of tones, from beneath the glaze appears charming decorations in 
leafwork and often also flowers and animals 
naturalistically handled. 

The French and English potters found 

this marvelous American Art a never failing 

sou-ce of astonishment, and acknov/ledge 

that it surpassed anything accomplished in 

the same direction by their countrymen. 

J^B^^L At the Pars exposition 1889 

I 1 B this pottery was an instant reve- 

^^fl^^ lation on opening day. 

m\ At the Columbian exposition 1893 the highest reward. 

^^r I Americans should feel proud of such a wonderful Art work, 

* all lovers of Art and those not acquainted with " Rookwood " 

Trade Mark. 








should not fail to examine this Pottery, only to be found in 



Hartford at 



THE ERNST SCHALL CO., 

Jewelers and Silversmiths. 5 ASYLUM STREET. 



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..TAPESTRY PAINTINGS.. 

2000 Tapestry Paintings to Choose From* 30 Artists 
Employed, including Gold Medalists of the Paris Salon. 

"When in New York don't fail to call and see these paintings. You will be welcomed. Make this 
place a point of interest. We rent Tapestry Paintings. Send 25c. for Compendium of 140 Studies 

« Jfrtlstlc Rome decorations « 



"VYT_ can show you effects NEVER before thought 



of, and at moderate prices too. 



"VYTL.__ have your house decorated and pointed by 

W ny inferior workmen, when you can have it 

done by skilled ^workmen— by artists — for the same 
price. 



Write for Color Schemes, Designs, Estimates. ARTISTS SENT TO 
ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD, to execute every sort of Deco- 
rating and painting. We are educating the Country m Color 
Harmony. 

Wall Paper, Stained Glass, 
Relief, Carpets, Furniture, 
Parquetry Tiles, Window Shades, 
Art Hangings, Draperies, Etc. 

TVT ft !!>•,—,>*»« New styles designed by gold medal artists. From 10 
W aii i apcrb* cents per r II up. Send 50 cents to prepay express- 
age on large sample books and drapery. A quantity of last year's paper 
$1 and $2 per roll; now 10 and 25 cents. Will include drapery samples in 
package. See our Antique Metalic, French. Pressed Silks, and Lida effects 
in special colors to match all kinds of woodwork, carpets and draperies. Have 
500 different wall hangings with draperies specially made at our Broomhead 
Mills, Patterson, X. J., to match. B1U 

"Tlt«-ai-\i»tMoc« ^ e nave Draperies to match all wall papers from 15 cents 
■L-'rapcneS* a yard. Th s is a very important feature to attain the 
acme of artistic excellence in decoration. No matter how much or how 
little you want to spe' d you must have harmony of form and colorings. 
Write us for samples. Special Silk Draperies made at our Broomhead Mills, 
Paterson, N. J. Encourage Home Iudustry ? Write us for samples. 

nP-ar^cft^r lVFarotMiilo We manufacture Tapestry Materials. Supe- 
1 apeSlTy IViaierialo* rior to foreign goods and half the price. 
Book of samp'es, 10 c^nts. Send $1.50 for trial order, for 2 yards of 50-inch 
wide No 6 goods, worth $3.00. 

T}<>rr\t"3+i\T0 AA\rirt> ^P on receipt of fl. Mr. Douthitt will~answe r 
■LVeCOrail V e /\Q.VlCe» any question on interior decorations — color- 
harmony and harmony of form, harmony of wall coverings, carpets, curtains, tiles, furniture, 
gas fixtures, etc. 

Manual of Art Decorations. ^S5Sm$u*S» ffife 5££iS£ 

tions of modern home interiors and studies. Price, $2. If you^want to be up in decoration 
send $2 for this book, worth $50. 

O •L__f mx H-hour tapestry painting lessons, in studio, $5. Complete written instruc 
OCnOOl* tions by mail $1. Tapestry paintings rented; fud size drawings, paints, 
brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere, Paris not accepted, are such advantages offered pupils. 
Send $J for complete instructions in tapestry painting and compendium of J 40 studies. _ 

rZXf«f««-i P»»<fifz»/4 Rt^l^nc? Over 100 new styles for wall coverings, at 25 cents 
VJODlin 1 nniCU DUridpa* per yard, 35 inches wide, thus costing the same 
as wall paper at $1 per roll. 24u kinds of Japanese Lida leather papers, at $2 per roll. 

C rJLAi-m A *.+ T^vi-a*-k/»*»Tr Grecian. Russian, Venetian, Brazilian, Roman, Rococco , 
VJODlin r\V\ L^rapcry. Dresden, Festoon College Stripe, Marie Antoinette, 
Indian, Calcutta, Bombay, Delft, Soudan, from 10 cents a yard to 75 cents. 

In order that we may introduce this line of NEW A.RT GOODS, we^will send one yard 
each of 50 different kinds of our most choice Patterns for $7.50. 

John R Douthitt, gAlST* 

Jt<£j*J* 286 Fifth Avenue, New York. Near 30th St. 




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oj The Connecticut Souvenir Spoon S 



THIS SPOON bears upon the 
handle the correct coat- 
of-arms of the commonwealth. 
An appropriate State feature is 
the introduction of the portrait 
of Jonathan Trumbull whom 
Washington was accustomed to 
speak of as "brother Jonathan" 
since which time the name has 
become proverbial. 



REPRODUCTION of ARTICLES 

of HISTORICAL and EARLY 

COLONIAL INTEREST. 



Underneath the portrait is 
given the State name. 

The quality is of Sterling Sil- 
ver 925-1000 fine, the design, 
finish and workmanship are of 
the very best. 

Price by mail, postpaid on 
receipt of price, $1.25 including 
three letters entwined cipher en- 
graved on the back; additional 
lettering three cents per letter. 

The Washington Sleeve Buttons. 

(Exact copies of those worn by our First 
President. ) 



u THE WASHINGTON SILVER 




pmgHgl 







GEORGE WASHINGTON wore at his 
wrists enameled gold cuff buttons, graceful 
in form, artistic in design, and elegant in 
finish. The ends of his flowing collar were 
caught together by two perfectly plain gold 
ovals, connected by a single link. 



THE ORIGINALS are now in 
possession of Mr Edward Law 
Rogers,' who writes of them as 
follows, in the Century Magazine: 
"This pair of cuff buttons, beau- 
tifully enameled on gold, are oval 
shape, the outer band being of 
white enamel with twelve minute 
stars This band encloses another 
of dark blue enamel, on which is 
a lozenge-shaped decoration of 
gold. These were worn upon the 
cuffs of the General's shirt, while 
the pair of plain gold were used 
at the collar." 



No. 1.— Heavy 14t gold enamel, $10.00. 

No. 1. — Sterling silver, enamel, 2. CO. 

No. 2.— Plain heavy 14kt. gold, 8.00. 

No. 2. — Plain heavy sterling silver, 1 00. 

Special Attention given to the execution of otdcts 
by Mail. 



The George HL Ford Company, New Haven, Conn, 



Plea«e mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to adYertisers. 




Little Shavers and Big Shavers 

in every land and clime, have for generations found delight in WILLIAMS' SHAVING 
SOAPS. For Richness and Creaminess of Lather, the softening action on he beard, and 
the soothing refreshing effect upon the face — Williams' Shaving Soaps are simply matchless. 
Williams' Shaving Soaps are used by all first-class barbers and are sold everywhere. 

Williams' Shaving Stick, 25 cts. Luxury Shaving TaMet, 25 cts. 

Genuine Yankee shaving Suap, 10 cts. White Glycerine 1 Toilet 1, 10 cts. 

Williams' Shaving Soap, (BarbersM, 6 round cakes. 1 lb., 40 cts. Exquisite also for Toilet. Trial 
Tablet for 2-cent stamp. By mail if your dealer does not supply you. 

Londc pI R is, THE J. B. WILLIAMS CO., Glastonbury, Conn. Dres s™n EY . 



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From taking a higher position and better sa'ary 
just because of your lack of a practical 
education ? We can train you in a few months 
and at small expense through our course in 
ACTUAL BUSINESS PRACTICE. In this 
work you do the same duties and use the same 
commercial papers as you will find again in 
business. &12.50 per month covers tuition, 
books and all stationery. Catalogue free. 




370 Asylum Street, HARTFORD, CONN, 



PADEREWSKI 




AND ALL THE GREATEST ARTISTS 

USE THE 

STEINWAY PIANO. 

WM. WANDER & SONS, 

SOLE REPRESENTATIVES, 



241 ASYLUM STREET. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



1900 CALENDAR, 



// 



Colonial 
Dames/ 

GIVEN AWAY. 

This exquisite calendar consists of four 
separate pictures lithographed in several 
colors on fine bristol-board. Underneath 
each picture are three calendar months. 
These pictures represent the four original 
colonies,— Massachusetts, New York, 
Pennsylvania and Virginia,— and on the 
back of each is a condensed history of 
that colony. 

This beautiful work is copyrighted, 
and cannot be purchased at any store 
or elsewhere. To each of our patrons 
desiring a copy, one will be mailed free 
on receipt of three shell trade-mark de- 
signs, cut from the front of cartons or 
wrappers enclosing bottles of Baker's 
Extracts. These calendars are expen- 
sive and the number is limited, so if you 
would be sure of getting one send at 
once. " First come, first served." 




BAKER EXTRACT CO., Springfield, Mass. 










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I